sot


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sot

 (sŏt)
n.
A drunkard.

[Middle English, fool, from Old English sott, from Old French sot.]

sot

(sɒt)
n
1. a habitual or chronic drunkard
2. a person stupefied by or as if by drink
[Old English, from Medieval Latin sottus; compare French sot a fool]
ˈsottish adj

sot

(sɒt)
adv
Scot indeed: used to contradict a negative statement: I am not! — You are sot!.
[a variant of so1, altered to rhyme with not]

sot

(sɒt)

n.
a drunkard.
[before 1000; Middle English: fool, Old English sott < Medieval Latin sottus]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sot - a chronic drinkersot - a chronic drinker      
alcoholic, alky, boozer, dipsomaniac, lush, souse, soaker - a person who drinks alcohol to excess habitually
imbiber, juicer, toper, drinker - a person who drinks alcoholic beverages (especially to excess)

sot

noun
A person who is habitually drunk:
Translations

sot

[sɒt] Nborrachín/ina m/f

sot

n (pej)Säufer m, → Trunkenbold m (dated)

sot

[sɒt] n (old) → ubriacone/a
References in classic literature ?
Dat ar was conscience, Andy; when I thought of gwine arter Lizy, I railly spected Mas'r was sot dat way.
Well, he sot up a bank, en say anybody dat put in a dollar would git fo' dollars mo' at de en' er de year.
It 'uz pow'ful hot, deckhan's en roustabouts 'uz sprawled aroun' asleep on de fo'cas'l', de second mate, Jim Bangs, he sot dah on de bitts wid his head down, asleep--'ca'se dat's de way de second mate stan' de cap'n's watch
She sot down," said Joe, "and she got up, and she made a grab at Tickler, and she Ram-paged out.
At dawn they rose, but now they were very tired and berries were few, sot hat by midday they were spent.
There was no doubt but he became his years, breathing, as he did, of wealth and consideration; and it was a surprising contrast to see our parlour sot - bald, dirty, pimpled, and robed in his old camlet cloak - confront him at the bottom of the stairs.
The lost prospect of a journey as sole passenger with this quarrelsome sot was not one to mourn over.
I ne'er sot up so i' MY life, not to say as it warna a marr'in', or a christenin', or a wake, or th' harvest supper.
Dan," he said to his son, "I was sot ag'in' this young feller when I first saw him, on account o' hasty jedgments.
The royal sot had nearly lost all consciousness, and all the ammonia in the world would not have set him on his feet again.
That you're a fool, que vous etes un sot, but everybody knew that.
SHE never showed such disrespect to HER husband: and as for affection, wives never think of that now-a-days, she supposes: but things were different in HER time--as if there was any good to be done by staying in the room, when he does nothing but grumble and scold when he's in a bad humour, talk disgusting nonsense when he's in a good one, and go to sleep on the sofa when he's too stupid for either; which is most frequently the case now, when he has nothing to do but to sot over his wine.