soviet


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Related to soviet: Soviet Bloc

so·vi·et

 (sō′vē-ĕt′, -ĭt, sŏv′ē-, sō′vē-ĕt′)
n.
1. One of the popularly elected legislative assemblies that were created after the Russian Revolution (1917) and existed at local, regional, and national levels in the former Soviet Union.
2. Soviet A native or inhabitant of the former Soviet Union.
adj.
1. Of or relating to a soviet.
2. often Soviet Of or relating to the former Soviet Union.

[Russian sovet, council, soviet, from Old Russian sŭvětŭ; see ksun in Indo-European roots.]

soviet

(ˈsəʊvɪət; ˈsɒv-)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in the former Soviet Union) an elected government council at the local, regional, and national levels, which culminated in the Supreme Soviet
2. (Historical Terms) (in prerevolutionary Russia) a local revolutionary council
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) of or relating to a soviet
[C20: from Russian sovyet council, from Old Russian sŭvĕtŭ]

Soviet

(ˈsəʊvɪət; ˈsɒv-)
adj
1. (Placename) of, characteristic of, or relating to the former Soviet Union, its people, or its government
2. (Peoples) of, characteristic of, or relating to the former Soviet Union, its people, or its government
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) of, characteristic of, or relating to the former Soviet Union, its people, or its government

So•vi•et

(ˈsoʊ viˌɛt, -ɪt, ˌsoʊ viˈɛt)

n.
1. Usually, Soviets. a governing official or citizen of the Soviet Union.
2. (l.c.) (in the Soviet Union)
a. a governmental council, being part of a hierarchy of councils at various levels of government, culminating in the Supreme Soviet.
b. a committee of workers, peasants, or soldiers during the revolutionary period.
3. (l.c.) any similar council in a socialist system of government.
adj.
4. of or pertaining to the Soviet Union or the Soviets.
5. (l.c.) of or pertaining to a soviet.
[1917; < Russian sovét council, advice, Old Russian, Old Church Slavonic sŭvětŭ=sŭ- together, with + větŭ counsel; calque of Greek symboúlion]
So′vi•et•dom, n.

Soviet

A Russian term for a local, regional or national elected government council which grew out of the pre-Revolutionary workers’ councils. These initially democratic bodies were dominated by Bolsheviks (later Communists) after 1917.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Soviet - an elected governmental council in a communist country (especially one that is a member of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics)soviet - an elected governmental council in a communist country (especially one that is a member of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics)
council - a body serving in an administrative capacity; "student council"
Adj.1.Soviet - of or relating to or characteristic of the former Soviet Union or its people; "Soviet leaders"
Translations
السوفيات
sovětský
sovjet
neuvosto
szovjet
sovét-Sovétmaîur
ソヴェトのソビエトソビエトのソ連の
sovietassovietinissovietų
sovietsovietsky
savet
sovyet
радянський

soviet

[ˈsəʊvɪət]
A. (Pol) (formerly) Nsoviet m
the Soviets (= people) → los soviéticos
B. ADJsoviético
Soviet RussiaRusia f Soviética
the Soviet Unionla Unión Soviética

Soviet

[ˈsəʊviət] adjsoviétiqueSoviet Russia nRussie f soviétiqueSoviet Union n
the Soviet Union → l'Union f soviétique

soviet

nSowjet m; the Soviets (= people)die Sowjets; the Supreme Sovietder Oberste Sowjet
adj attrsowjetisch, Sowjet-; soviet powerSowjetmacht f; soviet citizenSowjetbürger(in) m(f)

Soviet

:
Soviet Republic
Soviet Russia
nSowjetrussland nt
Soviet Union
nSowjetunion f

soviet

[ˈsəʊvɪət]
1. nsoviet m inv
2. adjsovietico/a
Soviet Russia → Russia Sovietica

soviet

(ˈsəuviət) adjective
and noun concerning the former Soviet Union.
References in classic literature ?
Primarily: examinations, when we perform the bodily movement of writing it down; conversation, when we assert it to display our historical erudition; and political discourses, when we are engaged in showing what Soviet government leads to.
So when, in 1966, Reed was approached by a friendly Russian apparatchik offering a truly socialist variant of fame, he boarded a plane for the Soviet Union as an Officially Approved Rock Star--the genuine American article, playing ersatz rock 'n' roll.
We stand for organized terror," declared Felix Dzerzhinsky, the first chief of the Cheka for Soviet dictator Vladimir Lenin.
and 16 other countries fight in defense of South Korea; China and the Soviet Union aid the North Koreans.
Soon, the game began--coup in Czechoslovakia, Marshall Plan, Russia's atomic bomb, America's hydrogen bomb, Soviet missiles in Cuba, American soldiers in Vietnam, arms control, and the Berlin wall falling--and Gaddis smoothly describes each exchange.
With the benefit of 15 years of post-Soviet history, this issue's symposium addresses the lasting effects of Soviet political, economic, and social institutions on the former Soviet states.
After the invasion, Castro's acceptance of a Soviet offer of nuclear missiles ignited another crisis with the U.
He was obviously much taken with what he saw, for he promptly started class with Vera Mosolova, one of the private ballet teachers still functioning in those early days of the Soviet Union.
Both Rodchenko's monochrome triptych Pure Red Color, Pure Yellow Color, Pure Blue Color, 1921, the culmination of his antipainting agenda, and Stenberg's spatial construction Spiral, 1920, one of a handful of surviving works from the laboratory phase of Soviet Constructivism, should have provided the perfect opportunity to discuss the influence these works had on their American postwar successors (even if only on a wall text).
In this excellent social and political history of the origins and development of the Soviet retail system, Julie Hessler advances compelling arguments about the nature of the NEP (New Economic Policy, 1921-29), the Stalinist economic system, and the relationship between state and society.
These two days and the week after mark the first official Soviet Mass Deportation of Latvian from their homeland, taking them to either their execution or the Siberian hard labor camps .
The Free World learned a great deal about the Soviet Navy during the years that followed, and a host of disturbing facts came to light.