sovietological

sovietological

(ˌsəʊvɪətəˈlɒdʒɪkəl; ˌsɒv-)
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) of or relating to Sovietology
References in periodicals archive ?
148) But historically speaking, his fourth project was the most important, because against almost the entire Sovietological, journalistic, policymaking, and broader intellectual communities in North America, Pipes argued forcefully and ultimately convincingly to enough people who mattered that the Soviet military buildup represented a threat to the United States.
Soviet experts complained that there was a general 'lack [of ] a professional corps of Sovietological journalists in the United States'.
Finally, the discussion here is not about the general lack of attention to the military side of the economy in the Sovietological literature alleged by several authors (Kontorovich, 2014).
com/p/articles/mi_mI282/is_n10_v43/ai_10847979; and "History of the Cold War: the CIA Estimates of Soviet Economic Strength," from John Howard Wilhelm, "The Failure of the American Sovietological Economics Profession," Europe-Asia Studies 55, no.
The suspicion that Soviet growth rates were cosmetically enhanced has been part of the Sovietological landscape from the beginning.
The traditional coupling of 'propaganda and entertainment' stands in contrast to the Sovietological view that Stalinist propaganda was by definition incredibly boring and imposed almost by force on the Soviet people.
Second, it explains East European politics as a product of the interaction of state and society, which in terms of understanding developments in the 1970s and the 1980s in many of the countries in the region (most notably Poland and Hungary), is an improvement over the more conventional Sovietological approaches that view East European politics as a product of Soviet policies, the overwhelming power of the prerogative state over a subject society, or the primacy of elites.
A wider area in which mainstream economics produced harmful policy proposals for the USSR concerned what was known as 'economic reform', that is the introduction of market elements within the 'administrative-command economy', to use the pejorative Gorbachiev-era label, itself much influenced by the Sovietological literature (Grossman, 1963).
Following the Sovietological method, Chafetz supports this argument with a review of the debates on Eastern Europe in the Soviet press and a detailed account, based on published sources, of the political battles that informed these debates.
To these economic revisionists, as to Sovietological economists as a group, production overwhelmingly meant output of heavy industry, extractive industries, and grain procurement, which had the effect of marginalizing the question of light industrial production and consumer goods.
From the beginning, his work has highlighted factors that, while not at the focus of Sovietological interest at the time, proved critical to the growing problems and eventual crisis that brought about the demise of the system.
Rutland has probably written one of the final Sovietological studies of party-management relations, synthesizing the major findings from the existing literature.