spades


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spade 1

 (spād)
n.
1. A sturdy digging tool having a thick handle and a heavy, flat blade that can be pressed into the ground with the foot.
2. Any of various similar digging or cutting tools.
tr.v. spad·ed, spad·ing, spades
To dig or cut with a spade.
Idiom:
call a spade a spade
To speak plainly and forthrightly.

[Middle English, from Old English spadu.]

spad′er n.

spade 2

 (spād)
n.
1. Games
a. A black, leaf-shaped figure on certain playing cards.
b. A playing card with this figure.
c. also spades(used with a sing. or pl. verb) The suit of cards represented by this figure.
2. Offensive Slang Used as a disparaging term for a black person.
Idiom:
in spades
To a considerable degree: They had financial trouble in spades.

[Italian spade, pl. of spada, card suit, from Latin spatha, sword, broad-bladed stirrer, from Greek spathē, broad blade.]

spades

- As a suit in a deck of cards, it has nothing to do with spades as tools, but comes from Spanish espada, "sword."
See also related terms for sword.
Translations
البَسْتوني
piky
spar
PikPique
spaîi
pikpiki
piky
maçamaça ...-sı

spade2

(speid) noun
one of the playing-cards of the suit spades.
spades noun plural
(sometimes treated as noun singular) one of the four card suits. the ten of spades.
References in classic literature ?
And who plays it," replied Phileas Fogg coolly, throwing down the ten of spades.
Tess soon perceived as she walked in the flock, sometimes with this one, sometimes with that, that the fresh night air was producing staggerings and serpentine courses among then men who had partaken too freely; some of the more careless women also were wandering in their gait--to wit, a dark virago, Car Darch, dubbed Queen of Spades, till lately a favourite of d'Urberville's; Nancy, her sister, nicknamed the Queen of Diamonds; and the young married woman who had already tumbled down.
One day when I rode over to the Shimerdas' I found Antonia starting off on foot for Russian Peter's house, to borrow a spade Ambrosch needed.
AN Undertaker Who Was a Member of a Trust saw a Man Leaning on a Spade, and asked him why he was not at work.
Against the last stripe of the green-gold sunset he saw a black human silhouette; a man in a chimney-pot hat, with a big spade over his shoulder.
You would almost have thought he was digging a cellar there in the sea; and when at length his spade struck against the gaunt ribs, it was like turning up old Roman tiles and pottery buried in fat English loam.
I thought if I had a little spade I could dig somewhere as he does, and I might make a little garden if he would give me some seeds.
That's the sexton's spade, and it's a well-used one, as you see.
One Sunday morning in June, 1879, about two weeks after what has been related, May senior left the house immediately after breakfast, taking a spade.
The little girl tried to say it in French, but could not remember the French for spade; the mother prompted her, and then told her in French where to look for the spade.
How hard that I must go on, delving and delving, day in and day out, merely to make a morsel of bread, when one lucky stroke of a spade might enable me to ride in my carriage for the rest of my life
Then he dropped his spade, snatched up his jacket, and came out into the road.