spasmic

spasmic

(ˈspæzmɪk)
adj
(Pathology) convulsive
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References in periodicals archive ?
Segal's sensitivity to West African rhythms is clearly on display in "Balazando" as he opens with a spasmic flurry of notes that might seem random (even accidental) in a European context but settle effortlessly into a polyrhythmic groove when Sissoko's kora arrives in melodic support.
Over the course of the day my back had been straightening and I hoped my spasmic stage entrances and exits passed for mere dignity.
Similarly, the orgasm of jouissance hinges as much on death as it does on loss; for one can very easily lose oneself in its throes, in that spasmic rush or engorgement of blood to the genitals which, at the critical moment, leads to separation and ejection of fluids from self.
Many organizations also reacted with spasmic convulsions when they faced the problem.
As the two bodies lay strewn across the drying banks of the river, moving only in spasmic jerks, its is clear that the association of this breathing is with that of a fish out of water, a jarring symbol for the experience of the refugee.
Seven black clad performers, the manifestation of Orpheus's emotions twitch energetically in spasmic, orgasmic movements.
The "story" of The Dante Quartet, as we glean it from Brakhage's catalogue notes and interview statements, is that there is a way Out spasmic magma of hellish proprioception: an optical reflex, like the rhythmic expectoration of phlegm, transits through a liminal stage of purgation into the realm of song, where the psychic and somatic narrative is sublimated in Orphic and Promethean myths: the earth sings in perpetual, volcanic self-creation.