spaza shop


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spaza shop

(ˈspɑːzə)
n
(Commerce) slang South African a small informal shop in a township, often run from a private house
[from township slang: dummy, camouflaged]
References in periodicals archive ?
One couple from Durban bought a plastic bag full of tangerines from a Spaza shop - or small, informal township store that is often run out of someone's home - for the guide to hand out to the kids.
5 Place where food is bought most of the time 170 100 Spaza shop 9 5.
President Mbeki's roots are firmly planted in this sector; his mother still runs a spaza shop (a small informal supermarket) where the president worked as a young boy.
Sasol chief executive, Pieter Cox, says: "Instead of wholesalers, distributors, routers and spaza shop involvement, energy products will be delivered directly to the Integrated Energy Centre that will become sole wholesaler and distributor.
It the ANL government had empowered, through access to finance, skills and government contracts, the 5m black SMEs (the taxi operators, small farmers and spaza shop owners) who survived apartheid restrictions on black business ownership--and who represent real indigenous enterpreneurs--it would have more broadly empowered black South Africans.
The Portfolio Committee on Small Business Development has recommended for the regulation of small-scale businesses in townships, tuck shops, spaza shops, street vendors and general dealers.
These big-name brands share the same space with other businesses of all descriptions such as restaurants, nightclubs, spaza shops, and electronic goods stores.
Retailers' drive into the township market threatens spaza shops.
2009) * European Space Agency (ESA) * Farmers * Industry and market actors Innovations: * Software products and services for precision farming system * Incubation support to companies in agriculture sector Sekhukhune, User Community South Africa * Spaza shops (2nd economy (Merz et al.
The Committee visited spaza shops, and cooperatives meant to empower disabled people in Soweto, Kagiso and Jeppestown, as well as developments designed to grow small, medium and micro enterprises (SMMEs) in Riversands and Midrand.
Local business people assured the Committee that the recent attacks on foreign-owned spaza shops were not committed by local business people, nor were they xenophobic in nature.
Through the AccessPoint model, Standard Bank partners with existing local retailers running spaza shops in townships and other traditionally underrepresented areas, to provide banking services such as cash deposits, withdrawals and money transfers in these shops.