special correspondent

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Translations

special correspondent

n (Press) → inviato speciale
References in classic literature ?
With the summer rush from the Outside came special correspondents for the big newspapers and magazines, and one and all, using unlimited space, they wrote Daylight up; so that, so far as the world was concerned, Daylight loomed the largest figure in Alaska.
There are a number of great special correspondents.
Our Special Correspondent in the Day after To-morrow reports,' the Journalist was saying--or rather shouting--when the Time Traveller came back.
13] See the interview of the special correspondent of the MATIN, with Mohammed-Ali Bey, on the day after the entry of the Salonika troops into Constantinople.
That address will not be given in extenso in these columns, for the reason that a full account of the whole adventures of the expedition is being published as a supplement from the pen of our own special correspondent.
Our Special Correspondent found the eminent scientist seated upon the roof, whither he had retreated to avoid the crowd of terrified patients who had stormed his dwelling.
a suitable climate to make good wine, report Special Correspondents Mac Margolis and Eric Pape.
But with some whales in abundance again, whaling countries argue that the moratorium is no longer necessary, reports Special Correspondents Kristin Kovner and Emily Flynn.
If he's right, the device would transform aviation as profoundly as the invention of the jet engine, report Special Correspondents Melissa Roberts and Michael Hastings.
While "Dear Leader" Kim Jong Il has never visited his mother's birthplace on the Sino-North Korean border, Chinese traders are making the trip, not just to visit family, but to do business, report Special Correspondents Stephanie Ollivier and Cortlan Bennett.
However, many of his own people and the Turkish government favor moving in a new direction, report Special Correspondents Owen Matthews and Sami Kohen.
But Japan's military profile has risen so dramatically in recent years that some form of constitutional reform seems almost inevitable, report Special Correspondents Amy Webb and Hideko Takayama.

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