speciosity


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spe·cious

 (spē′shəs)
adj.
1. Having the ring of truth or plausibility but actually fallacious: a specious argument.
2. Deceptively appealing: "It is easy enough to give the old idea [of programmatic music] a specious air of modernity" (Aaron Copland).

[Middle English, attractive, from Latin speciōsus, from speciēs, appearance; see spek- in Indo-European roots.]

spe′cious·ly adv.
spe′ci·os′i·ty (-shē-ŏs′ĭ-tē), spe′cious·ness (-shəs-nĭs) n.

speciosity

(ˌspiːʃɪˈɒsɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. a thing or person that is deceptively attractive or plausible
2. the state of being specious
3. obsolete the state of being beautiful

speciosity

the state or quality of appearing to be greater or more than is to be found on a close examination, as an argument that has the appearance of merit but does not stand up to a close look. — speeious, adj.
See also: Philosophy
the state or quality of appearing to be greater or more than is to be found on a close examination, as an argument that has the appearance of merit but does not stand up to a close look. — specious, adj.
See also: Images
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References in periodicals archive ?
Something of the same judgment might be rendered in the case of Intruder in the Dust, which seems quite a ways removed from black protest literature when Stevens's "significantless speciosity," as Chick calls it at one point, is removed from the context of the crime narrative (80).
The site is not 'lying near or adjoining' to a built-up area -as the guidelines state -and to argue otherwise the council's witnesses have indulged in speciosity of a high order.
The Mediterranean pulmonate genus Albinaria is well known for both its speciosity and the polytypy of its species (Gittenberger 1992; Mylonas 1992; Schilthuizen et al.