specious


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spe·cious

 (spē′shəs)
adj.
1. Having the ring of truth or plausibility but actually fallacious: a specious argument.
2. Deceptively appealing: "It is easy enough to give the old idea [of programmatic music] a specious air of modernity" (Aaron Copland).

[Middle English, attractive, from Latin speciōsus, from speciēs, appearance; see spek- in Indo-European roots.]

spe′cious·ly adv.
spe′ci·os′i·ty (-shē-ŏs′ĭ-tē), spe′cious·ness (-shəs-nĭs) n.

specious

(ˈspiːʃəs)
adj
1. apparently correct or true, but actually wrong or false
2. deceptively attractive in appearance
[C14 (originally: fair): from Latin speciōsus plausible, from speciēs outward appearance, from specere to look at]
ˈspeciously adv
ˈspeciousness n

spe•cious

(ˈspi ʃəs)

adj.
1. apparently true or right though lacking real merit; not genuine.
2. deceptively attractive.
3. Obs. pleasing to the eye.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin speciōsus fair, good-looking <speci(ēs) (see species)]
spe′cious•ly, adv.
spe′cious•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.specious - plausible but false; "a specious claim"; "spurious inferences"
false - not in accordance with the fact or reality or actuality; "gave false testimony under oath"; "false tales of bravery"
2.specious - based on pretensespecious - based on pretense; deceptively pleasing; "the gilded and perfumed but inwardly rotten nobility"; "meretricious praise"; "a meretricious argument"
insincere - lacking sincerity; "a charming but thoroughly insincere woman"; "their praise was extravagant and insincere"

specious

adjective fallacious, misleading, deceptive, plausible, unsound, sophistic, sophistical, casuistic The Duke was not convinced by such specious arguments.

specious

adjective
1. Containing fundamental errors in reasoning:
Translations

specious

[ˈspiːʃəs] ADJespecioso

specious

adj argument, proposal, logicvordergründig bestechend; excusefadenscheinig; claimunfundiert, fadenscheinig; charm, phrasesleer; nonsensehohl

specious

[ˈspiːʃəs] adj (frm) → specioso/a
References in classic literature ?
But the Puritan soldier and magistrate was not a man to be turned aside from his well-considered scheme, either by dread of the wizard's ghost, or by flimsy sentimentalities of any kind, however specious.
Wasn't there light in the fact which, as we shared our solitude, broke out with a specious glitter it had never yet quite worn?
O'CONNELL, "under what specious term it may disguise itself, slavery is still hideous.
Woodhouse must not, under the specious pretence of a morning drive, and an hour or two spent at Donwell, be tempted away to his misery.
Towards him they bend With awful reverence prone; and as a God Extoll him equal to the highest in Heav'n: Nor fail'd they to express how much they prais'd, That for the general safety he despis'd His own: for neither do the Spirits damn'd Loose all thir vertue; least bad men should boast Thir specious deeds on earth, which glory excites, Or close ambition varnisht o're with zeal.
They, however, who patronise these traditions give us very specious accounts of the zeal and piety of the Abyssins at their first conversion.
On the other hand, it will be equally forgotten that the vigor of government is essential to the security of liberty; that, in the contemplation of a sound and well-informed judgment, their interest can never be separated; and that a dangerous ambition more often lurks behind the specious mask of zeal for the rights of the people than under the forbidden appearance of zeal for the firmness and efficiency of government.
Would there be no danger of their being flattered into neutrality by its specious promises, or seduced by a too great fondness for peace to decline hazarding their tranquillity and present safety for the sake of neighbors, of whom perhaps they have been jealous, and whose importance they are content to see diminished?
The instability, injustice, and confusion introduced into the public councils, have, in truth, been the mortal diseases under which popular governments have everywhere perished; as they continue to be the favorite and fruitful topics from which the adversaries to liberty derive their most specious declamations.
In this there was much that reminded me of the specious totality of old wood-work which has rotted for long years in some neglected vault, with no disturbance from the breath of the external air.
Thus, the greater number of a man's errors come before him disguised under the specious form of necessity; then, after error has been committed in a moment of excitement, of delirium, or of fear, we see that we might have avoided and escaped it.
Reduce the hostile chiefs by inflicting damage on them; and make trouble for them, and keep them constantly engaged; hold out specious allurements, and make them rush to any given point.