spectacle


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spec·ta·cle

 (spĕk′tə-kəl)
n.
1.
a. Something that can be seen or viewed, especially something of a remarkable or impressive nature.
b. A public performance or display, especially one on a large or lavish scale.
c. A regrettable public display, as of bad behavior: drank too much and made a spectacle of himself.
2. spectacles
a. A pair of eyeglasses.
b. Something resembling eyeglasses in shape or suggesting them in function.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin spectāculum, from spectāre, to watch, frequentative of specere, to look at; see spek- in Indo-European roots.]

spectacle

(ˈspɛktəkəl)
n
1. a public display or performance, esp a showy or ceremonial one
2. a thing or person seen, esp an unusual or ridiculous one: he makes a spectacle of himself.
3. a strange or interesting object or phenomenon
4. (modifier) of or relating to spectacles: a spectacle case.
[C14: via Old French from Latin spectaculum a show, from spectāre to watch, from specere to look at]

spec•ta•cle

(ˈspɛk tə kəl)

n.
1. anything presented to the sight or view, esp. something striking or impressive.
2. a public show or display, esp. on a large scale.
3. spectacles, glass (def. 5).
4. Often, spectacles. something resembling eyeglasses in shape or function.
5. Obs. a spyglass.
Idioms:
make a spectacle of oneself, to behave badly or foolishly in public; be conspicuous for one's poor taste, rudeness, eccentricity, etc.
[1300–50; Middle English < Latin spectāculum a sight, spectacle, derivative of spectāre, frequentative of specere to look, regard]

spectacle

spectacles
1. 'spectacle'

A spectacle is a sight or view which is remarkable or impressive.

I was confronted with an appalling spectacle.
She stood at the head of the stairs and surveyed the spectacle.
2. 'spectacles'

A person's spectacles are their glasses. Spectacles is a formal or old-fashioned word.

...a schoolteacher in horn-rimmed spectacles.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.spectacle - something or someone seen (especially a notable or unusual sight); "the tragic spectacle of cripples trying to escape"
sight - anything that is seen; "he was a familiar sight on the television"; "they went to Paris to see the sights"
2.spectacle - an elaborate and remarkable display on a lavish scale
bullfight, corrida - a Spanish or Portuguese or Latin American spectacle; a matador baits and (usually) kills a bull in an arena before many spectators
display, presentation - a visual representation of something
naumachia, naumachy - a naval spectacle; a mock sea battle put on by the ancient Romans
3.spectacle - a blunder that makes you look ridiculous; used in the phrase `make a spectacle of' yourself
blooper, blunder, boner, boo-boo, botch, bungle, flub, foul-up, fuckup, pratfall, bloomer - an embarrassing mistake

spectacle

noun
1. show, display, exhibition, event, performance, sight, parade, extravaganza, pageant a director passionate about music and spectacle
2. sight, wonder, scene, phenomenon, curiosity, marvel, laughing stock the bizarre spectacle of an actor desperately demanding an encore
plural noun
1. glasses, specs (informal), eyeglasses (U.S.), eyewear He looked at me over the tops of his spectacles.

spectacle

noun
An impressive or ostentatious exhibition:
Translations
مَنْظَر، مَشْهَد
podívaná
skuesyn
sjón
imponuojantis
izrādeskats
spektakel

spectacle

[ˈspektəkl]
A. N
1.espectáculo m
a sad spectacleun triste espectáculo
to make a spectacle of o.shacer el ridículo, ponerse en ridículo
2. spectaclesgafas fpl, lentes mpl (LAm), anteojos mpl (LAm)
a pair of spectaclesunas gafas
to see everything through rose-coloured or rose-tinted spectaclesverlo todo color de rosa
B. CPD spectacle case Nestuche m de gafas

spectacle

[ˈspɛktəkəl] n
(= sight) → spectacle m
(= extravaganza) → spectacle mspectacle case n (British)étui m à lunettes

spectacle

n
(= show)Schauspiel nt; a sad spectacleein trauriger Anblick; to make a spectacle of oneselfunangenehm auffallen
spectacles pl (also pair of spectacles)Brille f

spectacle

[ˈspɛktəkl] nspettacolo
to make a spectacle of o.s. (fig) → coprirsi di ridicolo
see also spectacles

spectacle

(ˈspektəkl) noun
a sight, especially one that is very impressive or wonderful. The royal wedding was a great spectacle.
specˈtacular (-ˈtӕkju-) adjective
(negative unspectacular).
1. making a great show or display. a spectacular performance.
2. impressive; dramatic. a spectacular recovery.
specˈtacularly adverb
References in classic literature ?
The unusual spectacle of her busy mother rocking comfortably and reading early in the morning made Jo feel as if some unnatural phenomenon had occurred, for an eclipse, an earthquake, or a volcanic eruption would hardly have seemed stranger.
It is a sad spectacle to see the weaklings bruised, exhausted, fluttering back to earth.
Duncan cast the wide shawl of Cora before a spectacle he so much loved to contemplate, and then suffered his own head to seek a pillow on the rock.
She watched her dazed escort, still speechless from the spectacle of the fastidious Miss Carr tete-a-tete with a common Mexican vaquero, gallop off in the direction of the canyon, and then turned to George.
At least, we would gladly forewarn the unsuspecting girl that there is nothing in human shape or substance to receive her, unless it be the figure of Judge Pyncheon, who--wretched spectacle that he is, and frightful in our remembrance, since our night-long vigil with him
The scene was not without a mixture of awe, such as must always invest the spectacle of guilt and shame in a fellow-creature, before society shall have grown corrupt enough to smile, instead of shuddering at it.
So I saw him as I see the letters I form on this page; then, exactly, after a minute, as if to add to the spectacle, he slowly changed his place--passed, looking at me hard all the while, to the opposite corner of the platform.
That immaculate manliness we feel within ourselves, so far within us, that it remains intact though all the outer character seem gone; bleeds with keenest anguish at the undraped spectacle of a valor-ruined man.
Almost renouncing all thought of falling in with any game hereabouts, the ship had well nigh entered the straits, when the customary cheering cry was heard from aloft, and ere long a spectacle of singular magnificence saluted us.
It was the same in all the packing house cities; and suddenly the newspapers and public woke up to face the gruesome spectacle of a meat famine.
And that she should seem to consider me a spectacle, and totally overlook her own merits in that respect, was another puzzling thing, and a display of magnanimity, too, that was surprising in one so young.
They adopted her, with grave and formal military ceremonies of their own invention - solemnities is the truer word; solemnities that were so profoundly solemn and earnest, that the spectacle would have been comical if it hadn't been so touching.