spectatrix

spectatrix

(spɛkˈteɪtrɪks)
n
rare a female spectator
References in periodicals archive ?
XXII, 3, 12: Eusebium super his, cui erat Constantiani thalami cura commissa, alte spirantem addixere et dirum poenae letali, quem ab ima sorte ad usque iubendum imperatoria paene elatum, ideoque intolerabilem, humanorum spectatrix Adrastia, aurem (quod dicitur) uellens, monensque ut castigatius uiueret, reluctantem, praecipitem tamquam e rupe quodam egit excelsa.
While Friedberg explores the origins of the flaneuse in emerging consumer and film culture, Gleber, writing about Weimar culture, finds the predecessor of the female flaneur in the female moviegoer: "The spectatrix in the movie theatre," she argues, "is therefore a kind of prototype of the female flaneur, a moving spectator in the streets" (186).
Both Giuliana Bruno and Anne Friedberg (20) have identified this overlooked gender element in the history of spectatorship: that this spectatrix was in fact the original "spectator.
Never powerful enough to confess directly and completely to the audience in her own words, a woman storyteller speaks in fragments to onstage interlocutors and becomes the narratee and spectatrix of her own life.