spectral

(redirected from spectralness)
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spec·tral

 (spĕk′trəl)
adj.
1. Of or resembling a specter; ghostly.
2. Of, relating to, or produced by a spectrum.

spec·tral′i·ty (-trăl′ĭ-tē), spec′tral·ness (-trəl-nĭs) n.
spec′tral·ly adv.

spectral

(ˈspɛktrəl)
adj
1. of or like a spectre
2. (General Physics) of or relating to a spectrum: spectral colours.
3. (General Physics) physics (of a physical quantity) relating to a single wavelength of radiation: spectral luminous efficiency.
spectrality, ˈspectralness n
ˈspectrally adv

spec•tral

(ˈspɛk trəl)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to a specter; ghostly.
2. resembling a specter.
3. of, pertaining to, or produced by a spectrum or spectra.
4. resembling or suggesting a spectrum or spectra.
[1710–20; < Latin spectr(um) (see specter) + -al1]
spec′tral•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.spectral - of or relating to a spectrum; "spectral colors"; "spectral analysis"
2.spectral - resembling or characteristic of a phantom; "a ghostly face at the window"; "a phantasmal presence in the room"; "spectral emanations"; "spiritual tappings at a seance"
supernatural - not existing in nature or subject to explanation according to natural laws; not physical or material; "supernatural forces and occurrences and beings"

spectral

adjective ghostly, unearthly, eerie, supernatural, weird, phantom, shadowy, uncanny, spooky (informal), insubstantial, incorporeal, wraithlike the spectral quality of the light

spectral

adjective
Gruesomely suggestive of ghosts or death:
Translations
spektrální
aavemainen
spectral

spectral

[ˈspektrəl] ADJespectral

spectral

adj
(of ghosts)geisterhaft, gespenstisch
(of the spectrum)spektral, Spektral-; spectral colourSpektralfarbe f

spectral

[ˈspɛktrəl] adj (liter) (ghostly) → spettrale
References in classic literature ?
Or why, irrespective of all latitudes and longitudes, does the name of the White Sea exert such a spectralness over the fancy, while that of the Yellow Sea lulls us with mortal thoughts of long lacquered mild afternoons on the waves, followed by the gaudiest and yet sleepiest of sunsets?
Or why, irrespective of all latitudes and longitudes, does the name of the White Sea exert such a spectralness over the fancy, while that of the Yellow Sea lulls us with mortal thoughts of long lacquered mild afternoons on the waves, followed by the gaudiest and yet sleepiest of sunsets?