speculator


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

spec·u·la·tor

 (spĕk′yə-lā′tər)
n.
One that speculates: a commodities speculator.

speculator

(ˈspɛkjʊˌleɪtə)
n
1. a person who speculates
2. (Rugby) rugby NZ an undirected kick of the ball
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.speculator - someone who makes conjectures without knowing the facts
thinker - someone who exercises the mind (usually in an effort to reach a decision)
2.speculator - someone who risks losses for the possibility of considerable gainsspeculator - someone who risks losses for the possibility of considerable gains
adventurer, venturer - a person who enjoys taking risks
gambler - a person who wagers money on the outcome of games or sporting events
hedger - someone who counterbalances one transaction (as a bet) against another in order to protect against loss
operator - a speculator who trades aggressively on stock or commodity markets
scalper - someone who buys something and resells it at a price far above the initial cost; "he got theater tickets through a scalper"
venture capitalist - a speculator who makes money available for innovative projects (especially in high technology)

speculator

noun venturer, trader, entrepreneur, bear, bull, stag, manipulator, merchant venturer a City speculator

speculator

noun
1. One who speculates for quick profits:
2. A person engaged in buying and selling:
Translations
spekulant

speculator

[ˈspekjʊleɪtəʳ] Nespeculador(a) m/f

speculator

[ˈspɛkjʊleɪtər] nspéculateur/trice m/f

speculator

n (also Fin) → Spekulant(in) m(f)

speculator

[ˈspɛkjʊˌleɪtəʳ] n (Fin) → speculatore/trice
References in classic literature ?
About twelve years previously a Colorado real-estate speculator had made up his mind that it was wrong to gamble in the necessities of life of human beings: and so he had retired and begun the publication of a Socialist weekly.
A man kept me to breed chil'en for market, and sold 'em as fast as they got big enough; last of all, he sold me to a speculator, and my Mas'r got me o' him.
In another, the ground was cumbered with rusty iron monsters of steam-boilers, wheels, cranks, pipes, furnaces, paddles, anchors, diving-bells, windmill-sails, and I know not what strange objects, accumulated by some speculator, and grovelling in the dust, underneath which - having sunk into the soil of their own weight in wet weather - they had the appearance of vainly trying to hide themselves.
I can no more tell you the whys and wherefores of myself than I can lift myself up by the waistband and carry myself into the next county, as some one challenged a speculator in perpetual motion to do.
Any sort of claimant, with any sort of wild tale of prior invention, could find a speculator to support him.
We do not mean that his voice was a mere thread, such as we sometimes hear issuing from the mouth of these walruses; on the contrary, it was a strong voice, but stifled, an idea of which can be given only by comparing it with the noise of a saw cutting into soft and moistened wood,--the voice of a worn-out speculator.
Henry Half acre was a speculator in town-lots--a profession that was, just then, in high repute in the city of New York.
I realise that I am talking to a man who laid the foundation of his fortune by selling to a Stock Exchange speculator a Cabinet secret.
It touched on chances of gigantic wealth flung before eyes that could not see, or missed by the merest accident of time and travel; and through the mad shift of things, sometimes on horseback, more often afoot, now rich, now poor, in and out, and back and forth, deck-hand, train-hand, contractor, boardinghouse keeper, journalist, engineer, drummer, real-estate agent, politician, dead-beat, rumseller, mine-owner, speculator, cattle-man, or tramp, moved Harvey Cheyne, alert and quiet, seeking his own ends, and, so he said, the glory and advancement of his country.
A speculator among the crowd offered six to one on Galahad, but found no takers.
He had been a hard worker, a daring speculator with nerves of iron, and courage which would have glorified a nobler cause.
But, trivial things, invented and pursued for bread, become very serious matters of fact; and, apart from this consideration, I am not at all prepared to say, myself, that if Caleb had been a Lord Chamberlain, or a Member of Parliament, or a lawyer, or even a great speculator, he would have dealt in toys one whit less whimsical, while I have a very great doubt whether they would have been as harmless.