speculum


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Related to speculum: Pelvic exam

spec·u·lum

 (spĕk′yə-ləm)
n. pl. spec·u·la (-lə) or spec·u·lums
1. A mirror or polished metal plate used as a reflector in optical instruments.
2. An instrument for dilating the opening of a body cavity for medical examination.
3. Zoology
a. A bright, often iridescent patch of color on the wings of certain birds, especially ducks.
b. A transparent spot in the wings of some butterflies or moths.

[Middle English, surgical speculum, from Latin, mirror, from specere, to look at; see spek- in Indo-European roots.]

speculum

(ˈspɛkjʊləm)
n, pl -la (-lə) or -lums
1. (General Physics) a mirror, esp one made of polished metal for use in a telescope, etc
2. (Medicine) med an instrument for dilating a bodily cavity or passage to permit examination of its interior
3. (Zoology) a patch of distinctive colour on the wing of a bird, esp in certain ducks
[C16: from Latin: mirror, from specere to look at]

spec•u•lum

(ˈspɛk yə ləm)

n., pl. -la (-lə), -lums.
1. a mirror or reflector, esp. one of polished metal, as on a reflecting telescope.
2. a medical instrument for rendering a part accessible to observation, as by enlarging an orifice.
3. a lustrous or colored area on the wings of certain birds.
[1590–1600; < Latin: mirror, derivative of spec(ere) to look]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.speculum - a mirror (especially one made of polished metal) for use in an optical instrumentspeculum - a mirror (especially one made of polished metal) for use in an optical instrument
mirror - polished surface that forms images by reflecting light
2.speculum - a medical instrument for dilating a bodily passage or cavity in order to examine the interior
medical instrument - instrument used in the practice of medicine
Translations
Spekulum

speculum

[ˈspekjʊləm] N (speculums, specula (pl)) → espéculo m

speculum

n pl <specula> (Med) → Spekulum nt; (in telescope) → Metallspiegel m

spec·u·lum

n. espéculo, instrumento para dilatar un conducto o cavidad.

speculum

n (pl -la o -lums) espéculo
References in periodicals archive ?
Size-11mm (5 Vaginal speculum, Cusco Pattern solid blades and folding handles and chromium Plated Large (6 Vaginal speculum, Cusco Pattern solid blades and folding handles and chromium Plated Medium.
Founder Urs Gaudenz has helped develop the open-source, downloadable software for a 3D-printed speculum.
OfficeSPEC single-use vaginal speculum with built-in LED light improves functionality and efficiency, eliminates risk of cross contamination at price point that delivers value
I felt relieved and hoped that, by the time I was old enough to need a pelvic exam, there'd be a better way to have it done than by using the speculum pictured in the brochure.
In early July 2014, the American College of Physicians (ACP) issued guidelines advising against bimanual pelvic exams and speculum exams for the detection of pathological conditions in asymptomatic adult women who are not pregnant.
Your doctor will gently insert an instrument called a speculum into your vagina.
Thus, students could practise speculum insertion on the models, but practise the Pap smear on something containing real cells for the experience of transferring actual cellular material onto slides with spatulas and endocervical brushes, and using the fixative on the slides.
Muller) and texts such as Speculum Dominarum provide viewpoints on the less familiar writings around the theme.
Doctors will often warm a speculum (the instrument used for internal examinations) under warm water before they start.
amniotic fluid and a speculum examination can be avoided.
Cervical, perianal, perirectal, or perineal specimens are not acceptable, and a speculum should not be used for culture collection.
Once he or she becomes comfortable with the mechanics of tube insertion, a speculum can be placed over the tape with the free hand to mimic the anatomy of the ear canal.