linguistic form

(redirected from speech form)

linguistic form

n.
A meaningful unit of language, such as an affix, a word, a phrase, or a sentence.

linguis′tic form′


n.
any meaningful unit of speech, as a sentence, phrase, word, or morpheme.
[1920–25]
References in periodicals archive ?
This was the message sent from the president of the International forum for Human Rights and Freedoms - Department for Macedonia Idriz Sinani, in his yearly speech form the adaption and publishing of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
Prosthetic hearing device that transforms a detected speech into a speech of a speech form assistive in understanding the semantic meaning in the detected speech.
s passing marked the loss of another speech form, a comprehensive archive of digitized audio, visual and textual documents is now available for future generations.
The strategies Abe sketched out in a speech form the third and most important plank in his "Abenomics" platform, which so far has focused on what he calls the first "two arrows" in his arsenal: loosening monetary policy and boosting public spending.
Besides, the results indicate that gesture and speech form an integrated system that helps us in language comprehension.
Thus it was not actually necessary to determine what a specific speech form meant, but only to determine if a given speech form produced the same response/meaning or a different one.
The astonishing nature of this particular equivalence relation needs emphasizing: Hough offers a direct speech form for Mr.
When all the engrams have been removed, the student achieves a state of "clear" and gains freedom from disease and the effects of ageing; perfect memory; immunity from radiation; the ability to command others using a speech form known as Tone 40; infinite incarnation and freedom from the restraints of space and time.
In such cases the less economically prestigious speech form is selected against, however, points of counter control (Skinner, 197 1) can be observed.
Evidence suggests that to be able to read, children must be able to decode text, translating it into a speech form, and children must also be able to understand spoken language.
Margaret took the Douglass mode, the grand sermonic speech form, as Bible and as Prophetic hymn, which both Blake and Kit Smart and Melville and Whitman copped on that other side, and rises up through the intense self-consciousness of the Harlem Renaissance re-expressions of assaulted humanity, wailing its beauty from under the Beast's foot, no matter, "Beast, Beast, I'm from the East" .