speechifying


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speech·i·fy

 (spē′chə-fī′)
intr.v. speech·i·fied, speech·i·fy·ing, speech·i·fies
To give a speech: "In Washington, cabinet secretaries pose and speechify" (Jonathan Alter).

speech′i·fi′er n.

speechifying

(ˈspiːtʃɪˌfaɪɪŋ)
n
the act of making a speech, esp pompously and boringly
Translations

speechifying

[ˈspiːtʃɪfaɪɪŋ] N (pej) → disertaciones fpl, prolijas peroratas fpl

speechifying

nVolksreden pl, → Schwätzerei f
References in classic literature ?
I do not understand you, husband," replied Teresa; "do as you like, and don't break my head with any more speechifying and rethoric; and if you have revolved to do what you say-"
Meanwhile, and pending the arrangement of the proceedings, and a fair division of the speechifying, the public in the large room were eyeing, by turns, the empty platform, and the ladies in the Music Gallery.
He has taken it into his head to play the lawyer, prince, and he practices speechifying, and is always repeating his eloquent pleadings to his children.
In the evening there is a dinner for the relations and the chief local authorities, with more health-drinking and speechifying, and the next morning, when I come downstairs thankful to have done with it, I am confronted by the altar still in its place, cake crumbs and candle-grease and all, because any hasty removal of it would imply a most lamentable want of sentiment, deplorable in anybody, but scandalous and disgusting in a tender female.
Be hanged to these civilians, he thought to himself, they are always for arranging and speechifying.
You are talking and speechifying away, but tell me, would you kill the old woman /yourself/?
Once the speechifying was finished, Sir Ken called me over.
As Optimus is a pompous, vain and speechifying dumbbell, it's a blessing he's sidelined for long periods.
This has absolutely nothing to do with the turning point in English history about to take place, but it's such a natural gesture it brings these characters to life in a way that no amount of speechifying ever could.
This has absolutely nothing to do with the turning point in English history about to take place, but it's such a casual, natural gesture it brings these characters to life in a way that no amount of declaiming and speechifying ever could.
There's at least one thing--contractual demands related to their paid speechifying that are worthy of the most indulged rock star (Van Halen's "only brown M&Ms" comes to mind).
So any upcoming Yes and No campaign ads should have Alex Salmond speechifying on the Speyside whisky trail and Alistair Darling pontificating as he island hops in the Hebrides.