spends


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms.
Related to spends: expends

spend

 (spĕnd)
v. spent (spĕnt), spend·ing, spends
v.tr.
1. To use up or put out; expend: spent an hour exercising.
2. To pay out (money).
3. To wear out; exhaust: The storm finally spent itself.
4. To pass (time) in a specified manner or place: spent their vacation in Paris.
5.
a. To throw away; squander: spent all their resources on futile projects.
b. To give up (one's time or efforts, for example) to a cause; sacrifice.
v.intr.
1. To pay out or expend money.
2. To be exhausted or consumed.
n.
1. An amount of money spent on something: doubled the spend on computers.
2. The spending of money; expenditure: the management of spend.

[Middle English spenden, partly from Old English -spendan (from Latin expendēre, to expend; see expend) and partly from Old French despendre, to weigh out; see dispense.]

spend′a·ble adj.
spend′er n.
Synonyms: spend, disburse, expend
These verbs mean to pay or give out money or an equivalent: spent $30 on gas; disbursed funds from the account; expended all her energy teaching the class.
Antonym: save1

spends

(spɛndz)
pl n
(Banking & Finance) dialect Lancashire a child's pocket money

spends

  • cabbage pounder - An inept golfer who spends a lot of time in the rough.
  • carpet knight - A knight who spends his time in luxury and idleness—knighted on the carpet at court rather than on the field of battle.
  • mouse potato - A person who spends too much time on the computer, patterned on couch potato.
  • spendthrift - One who spends the "thrift" or earnings/wealth of another.
References in classic literature ?
She spends all her pennies on beggars and omnibus rides, and she is perfectly happy.
She lives in reputation at the polite end of the town, and is so good an economist, that she spends three times the income of her fortune, without running into debt.
And yet we were driven by the circumstance of cold and rainy weather to seek refuge in a saloon, where we had to spend part of our pitiful dole for drink.
Nixon, the solicitor, asked him to spend a Sunday at Hampstead, and Philip passed a happy day with a set of exuberant strangers; he ate and drank a great deal, took a walk on the heath, and came away with a general invitation to come again whenever he liked; but he was morbidly afraid of being in the way, so waited for a formal invitation.
Yes, a whole century in tears could I spend because of the wicked people who have wrecked my life!
The house on her own estate was quite in ruins, and Levin and his wife had persuaded her to spend the summer with them.
Most of the students went home to spend their vacation.
C'est un utchitel," Blanche would say of me, "qui a gagne deux cent mille francs, and but for me, would have had not a notion how to spend them.