spherule

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spher·ule

 (sfîr′o͞ol, -yo͞ol, sfĕr′-)
n.
A miniature sphere; a globule.

[Late Latin sphaerula, diminutive of Latin sphaera, ball; see sphere.]

spher′u·lar (sfîr′yə-lər, sfĕr′-) adj.

spherule

(ˈsfɛruːl)
n
a very small sphere or globule
[C17: from Late Latin sphaerula a little sphere]
ˈspherular adj

spher•ule

(ˈsfɛr ul, -yul, ˈsfɪər-)

n.
a small sphere or spherical body.
[1655–65]
spher′u•lar (-yʊ lər) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.spherule - a small sphere
globe, orb, ball - an object with a spherical shape; "a ball of fire"
Translations

spher·ule

n. esfera diminuta.
References in periodicals archive ?
Coccidioides spherules were morphologically identified in 2 fossilized, 8,500-year-old bison mandibles recovered from a flood plain in central Nebraska, suggesting that bison had migrated from disease-endemic areas or that Coccidioides previously inhabited a different or broader geographic range (34).
Both serum antibody complement fixation and pleural fluid antigen detection tests for Coccidioides were negative, and the lung biopsy did not show evidence of granuloma with Coccidioides spherules.
Within hours to days, they develop into spherules that incite an inflammatory reaction in the region recruiting immune-mediated cells such as polymorphonuclear leukocytes and eosinophils.
Magnetite and silicate spherules found from the ice layers of 536-537 in Greenland support this alternative explanation (Abbott et al.
The second set of features consists of nanometer- to-micrometer-sized spherules that are sandwiched between layers within the rock and are distinct from carbonate and the underlying silicate layer.
Stored uric acid has been described as precipitated spherules of potassium or sodium urates (Mullins 1979).
The report focuses on spherules, or droplets of solidified molten rock expelled by the impact of a comet or meteor.
Kirkwood contains small spheres with composition, structure and distribution that differ from other iron-rich spherules, nicknamed blueberries, that Opportunity found at its landing site and throughout the Meridiani Planum area it has explored.
The differential diagnosis for such large (30-60 mm), spherical structures with single or multiple budding includes P brasiliensis, giant blastoconidia of Candida albicans, and the spherules of Coccidioides immitis.
Yellow-gold spherules form within the interpalpebral aperture, usually at the limbus, but may start centrally.
We never have seen such a dense accumulation of spherules in a rock outcrop on Mars.
The age of the spherules suggests a gradual decline in Earth's pummeling.