sphygmomanometer


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sphyg·mo·ma·nom·e·ter

 (sfĭg′mō-mə-nŏm′ĭ-tər) also sphyg·mom·e·ter (sfĭg-mŏm′ĭ-tər)
n.
An instrument for measuring blood pressure in the arteries, especially one consisting of a pressure gauge and a nylon or rubber cuff that wraps around the upper arm and inflates to constrict the arteries.

sphyg′mo·man′o·met′ric (-măn′ə-mĕt′rĭk) adj.
sphyg′mo·man′o·met′ri·cal·ly adv.
sphyg′mo·ma·nom′e·try n.

sphygmomanometer

(ˌsfɪɡməʊməˈnɒmɪtə)
n
(Medicine) med an instrument for measuring arterial blood pressure
[C19: from sphygmo- + manometer, on the model of French sphygmomanomètre]

sphyg•mo•ma•nom•e•ter

(ˌsfɪg moʊ məˈnɒm ɪ tər)

n.
an instrument, often attached to an inflatable cuff and used with a stethoscope, for measuring blood pressure in an artery.
[1860–65]
sphyg`mo•man`o•met′ric (-ˌmæn əˈmɛ trɪk) adj.
sphyg`mo•ma•nom′e•try, n.

sphygmomanometer

manometer, def. 2.
See also: Blood and Blood Vessels, Instruments
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sphygmomanometer - a pressure gauge for measuring blood pressuresphygmomanometer - a pressure gauge for measuring blood pressure
pressure gage, pressure gauge - gauge for measuring and indicating fluid pressure
Translations

sphyg·mo·ma·nom·e·ter

n. esfigmomanómetro, instrumento para determinar la presión arterial.
References in periodicals archive ?
Your doctor can do this by using a sphygmomanometer, the balloon-like cuff they put on your arm.
Subsequent investigation identified the source of the mercury exposure to be a broken sphygmomanometer (blood pressure monitor) at the home day care center attended by the child.
Blood pressure was measured over the sleeve and below a rolled-up sleeve with a mercury-filled column sphygmomanometer.
The global blood pressure monitoring testing market segmentation is based on product types (sphygmomanometer, mercury sphygmomanometer, aneroid sphygmomanometer, digital sphygmomanometer, automated blood pressure monitors, ambulatory blood pressure monitors, blood pressure transducers, reusable transducers, disposable transducers, blood pressure instrument accessories, blood pressure cuffs, reusable blood pressure cuffs, disposable blood pressure cuffs, bladders, bulbs and valves).
Whether the switch from Riva-Rocci or aneroid sphygmomanometer to this device will affect detection of AF in usual care is unknown.
The common method of measuring blood pressure is to use a sphygmomanometer (either manual or electric) and these devices are readily available in the market place today to purchase for home use.
It was Scipione Riva-Rocci who finally devised a sphygmomanometer that was useful in clinical practice.
Repeating the blood pressure measurement using a sphygmomanometer may reveal a systolic pressure as low as 26 mmHg below the automatic reading.
Your physician also should calibrate your monitor with the sphygmomanometer at his or her office and then re-calibrate it every six to 12 months or sooner if you bump it or drop it.
Rodrigues (2007) outlined three types of error in physiologic measurements: personal or operator error (not using consistent procedures), method error (using the wrong size cuff), and instrumental error (using a sphygmomanometer that has not been calibrated recently).
The Palm Aneroid Sphygmomanometer by Labtron is a convenient, compact and hand-held device.