spiced


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spice

 (spīs)
n.
1.
a. Any of various pungent, aromatic plant substances, such as cinnamon or nutmeg, used to flavor foods or beverages.
b. These substances considered as a group.
2. Something that adds zest or interest: The controversy added spice to the political campaign.
3. A pungent aroma.
tr.v. spiced, spic·ing, spic·es
1. To season with spices.
2. To add zest or interest to: uses witty rhymes to spice up the song.

[Middle English, from Old French espice, from Late Latin speciēs, wares, spices, from Latin, kind; see species.]

spiced

(spaɪst)
adj
(Cookery) prepared or flavoured with spices
Translations
مُتَبَّل
okořeněný
krydret
fûszerezett
kryddaîur

spiced

[ˈspaɪst] adj [dish, sauce] → épicé(e)
spiced with sth → relevé(e) avec qchspick and span spick-and-span [ˌspɪkənˈspæn] adjimpeccable

spiced

adj (Cook) savoury dishwürzig; sweet disharomatisch; spiced wineGlühwein m; highly spicedpikant (gewürzt); delicately spiceddelikat gewürzt

spice

(spais) noun
1. a usually strong-smelling, sharp-tasting vegetable substance used to flavour food (eg pepper or nutmeg). We added cinnamon and other spices.
2. anything that adds liveliness or interest. Her arrival added spice to the party.
verb
to flavour with spice. The curry had been heavily spiced.
spiced adjective
containing spice(s). The dish was heavily spiced.
ˈspicy adjective
tasting or smelling of spices. a spicy cake; He complained that the sausages were too spicy for him.
ˈspiciness noun
References in classic literature ?
As she sat beside the window, smoothing the letter out upon her knee, heavy and spiced odors stole in to her with the songs of birds and the humming of insects in the air.
Warmest climes but nurse the cruellest fangs: the tiger of Bengal crouches in spiced groves of ceaseless verdure.
of wine highly spiced, and sweetened also with honey;
But he left the matter entirely to his cook, who, like all other cooks, considered nothing fit to eat unless it were rich pastry, or highly-seasoned meat, or spiced sweet cakes--things which Proserpina's mother had never given her, and the smell of which quite took away her appetite, instead of sharpening it.
All are sated with this deep draught of pleasure, and eager to commence another trapping campaign; for hardship and hard work, spiced with the stimulants of wild adventures, and topped off with an annual frantic carousal, is the lot of the restless trapper.
With that sort of spiced food provided for his anxious thought, watchful for strange men, strange beasts, strange turns of the tide, he would make the best of his way up, a military seaman with a short sword on thigh and a bronze helmet on his head, the pioneer post- captain of an imperial fleet.