splinters


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splin·ter

 (splĭn′tər)
n.
1. A sharp, slender piece, as of wood, bone, glass, or metal, split or broken off from a main body.
2. A splinter group.
v. splin·tered, splin·ter·ing, splin·ters
v.intr.
To split or break into sharp, slender pieces; form splinters.
v.tr.
To cause to splinter. See Synonyms at break.

[Middle English, from Middle Dutch.]

splin′ter·y adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.splinters - wood in small pieces or splinterssplinters - wood in small pieces or splinters; "the vessel was beaten to matchwood on the rocks"
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
References in classic literature ?
The fine splinters still flew about in the air: and now we shall hear what happened next.
Two splinters of wood, and some linen for a bandage.
The patches of grass were splinters of wood, and where neither grass nor sawdust showed was a solid wooden flooring.
Kelly ripped up a bottom board and began paddling, but dropped it with a cry of pain as its splinters drove into his hands.
Pena, that the Queen Mother, who was given to curious arts, caused the King her husband's nativity to be calculated, under a false name; and the astrologer gave a judgment, that he should be killed in a duel; at which the Queen laughed, thinking her husband to be above challenges and duels: but he was slain upon a course at tilt, the splinters of the staff of Montgomery going in at his beaver.
It follows them from an earlier date and could not easily be changed, and it may serve to recall to an elder generation than this the time when their author was breaking so many lances in the great, forgotten war between Realism and Romanticism that the floor of the "Editor's Study" in Harper's Magazine was strewn with the embattled splinters.
It was a mere mass of splinters now, crushed out of shape against the rocks.
The Thing itself lay almost entirely buried in sand, amidst the scattered splinters of a fir tree it had shivered to frag- ments in its descent.
More than one, in digging underneath the wheel, was dangerously injured by the splinters of stone.
It may have been that he was too bright a genius to live long, or it may have been that he took some pernicious substance into his bill, and thence into his maw--which is not improbable, seeing that he new-pointed the greater part of the garden-wall by digging out the mortar, broke countless squares of glass by scraping away the putty all round the frames, and tore up and swallowed, in splinters, the greater part of a wooden staircase of six steps and a landing--but after some three years he too was taken ill, and died before the kitchen fire.
So he set his ear to the crack and listened, and listened, and listened, and the steps a-scraping around out there all the time; and at last he nudged us, and we slid out, and stooped down, not breathing, and not making the least noise, and slipped stealthy towards the fence in Injun file, and got to it all right, and me and Jim over it; but Tom's britches catched fast on a splinter on the top rail, and then he hear the steps coming, so he had to pull loose, which snapped the splinter and made a noise; and as he dropped in our tracks and started somebody sings out:
Had that wit been all of the arrogant, upstanding Van Horn, and had it gone out as the flickering flame of a splinter of wood goes out when it is quite burnt to a powder-fluff of ash?