split-brain


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split-brain

(splĭt′brān′)
adj.
Of, relating to, or subjected to surgical separation of the hemispheres of the brain by severing the corpus callosum: split-brain operation to prevent epileptic seizures.

split′-brain′



adj.
having, involving, or pertaining to a separation of the cerebral hemispheres by severing the corpus callosum.
[1955–60]
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the distinction has widespread applicability in discussions of the structure of consciousness and of pathologies of conscious experience, this paper will illustrate the importance of the distinction primarily using the debate about consciousness in split-brain subjects, suggesting that those who have argued that split-brain subjects have two streams of consciousness apiece and those who have argued that they have a unified consciousness may both be right.
of California-Santa Barbara) describes how several animal and human split-brain studies led him to change his long-term view on mind/brain interactions.
Such split-brain patients were studied by Roger Sperry and Michael Gazzaniga at Caltech in the early 1960s.
The scientist said, "You are seeing the split-brain in action"
I think this is a particularly Freudian concept, renewed by the split-brain studies by Gazzaniga, and Society of Mind theories by Minsky, etc.
For instance, Lowe ignores philosophical debates over the unity of consciousness that focus on split-brain cases.
For Rolls (chapter 29), consciousness means recall, comparison, and planning, as evidenced by split-brain patients.
From the studies of the split-brain, the left brain is more dominant for linguistic abilities, calculations, and math and logic abilities, where the right brain is more dominant for spatial ability (Oono 1996), and it was also reported that the language center of most right-handed people is on the left side of the brain (Kubota 1982; Sakano, 1982).
Consider this analogy: In the early 1960s, Roger Sperry and Ronald Meyers discovered the split-brain effect, in which the two hemispheres of the brain are responsible for different modes of thought and action.
The MSCS architecture handles this issue using a single quorum resource in the cluster that is used as the tie-breaker to avoid split-brain scenarios.
More to the point, however, when the two hemispheres in split-brain patients produce conflicting behavior and the person is then asked to explain why he or she has behaved in this fashion, the left hemisphere will confabulate a reason based on its own limited information.
This split-brain finding may lead to techniques for boosting working memory capacity, Miller says.