spoliation


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spo·li·a·tion

 (spō′lē-ā′shən)
n.
1. The act of despoiling or plundering.
2. Law Unauthorized alteration or destruction of a legal document, such as a contract or will.

[Middle English spoliacioun, from Anglo-Norman, from Latin spoliātiō, spoliātiōn-, from spoliātus, past participle of spoliāre, to despoil; see spoil.]

spo′li·a′tor n.

spoliation

(ˌspəʊlɪˈeɪʃən)
n
1. the act or an instance of despoiling or plundering
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the authorized seizure or plundering of neutral vessels on the seas by a belligerent state in time of war
3. (Law) law the material alteration of a document so as to render it invalid
4. (Law) English ecclesiastical law the taking of the fruits of a benefice by a person not entitled to them
[C14: from Latin spoliātiō, from spoliāre to spoil]
ˈspoliatory adj

spoliation

Church Law. the taking of property by an incumbent upon resignation or any other departure. See also ships; theft; war.
See also: Church
the act of seizing neutral ships with government permission in time of war. See also church; theft.
See also: Ships
the process of robbing or plundering, especially in time of war and on a large scale. See also church; ships.
See also: Theft, War
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.spoliation - (law) the intentional destruction of a document or an alteration of it that destroys its value as evidence
destruction, devastation - the termination of something by causing so much damage to it that it cannot be repaired or no longer exists
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
2.spoliation - the act of stripping and taking by force
pillaging, plundering, pillage - the act of stealing valuable things from a place; "the plundering of the Parthenon"; "his plundering of the great authors"
Translations

spoliation

[ˌspəʊlɪˈeɪʃən] Ndespojo m

spoliation

n (liter)Plünderung f
References in classic literature ?
The theory of Free Trade is only applicable to systems of exchange, not to systems of spoliation.
Yet the spoliation on the spot was emphasized and even put first in the demand.
Of all the reminders that she had ever received that her people were socially extinct there was none so forcible as this spoliation.
In trickery, evasion, procrastination, spoliation, botheration, under false pretences of all sorts, there are influences that can never come to good.
He believed almost with devoutness in the plot which he had detected for the spoliation of Lord Wetherby's summer-house, that plot of which he held Lord Dawlish to be the mainspring.
He was like a man counting the cost of an unlucky speculation--irritated, depressed--exasperated with himself and with others, with the fortunate, with the indifferent, with the callous; yet the wrong done him appeared so cruel that he would perhaps have dropped a tear over that spoliation if it had not been for his conviction that men do not weep.
The whole business of the human race, between London and Dover, being spoliation, Mr Dorrit was waylaid at Dartford, pillaged at Gravesend, rifled at Rochester, fleeced at Sittingbourne, and sacked at Canterbury.
Such was the greed of the fellow, that his mind had shot beyond halves, two-thirds, three-fourths, and gone straight to spoliation of the whole.
Colonisation, violation a grande echelle des droits de l'homme, spoliation des richesses- Autant de droits confisques par le Maroc dans les territoires sahraouis occupes.
In June 2015, Trillium was permitted inclusion spoliation to its case, signifying that it likewise accuses the provincial government of terminating documents.
As a result of this potential evidence spoliation, Segue's investigation of the accident, its defences in future litigation, and its ability to prosecute cross-claims may have been drastically impaired.
While employee movement is a routine element of modern business life, it takes on critical significance in the context of e-discovery, where failing to properly track employees can result in data spoliation and severe sanctions.