spondee


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spon·dee

 (spŏn′dē′)
n.
A metrical foot consisting of two long or stressed syllables.

[Middle English sponde, from Old French spondee, from Latin spondēum, from neuter of spondēus, of libations, spondaic, from Greek spondeios, from spondē, libation (from its use in songs performed at libations); see spend- in Indo-European roots.]

spondee

(ˈspɒndiː)
n
(Poetry) prosody a metrical foot consisting of two long syllables (¯¯)
[C14: from Old French spondée, from Latin spondēus, from Greek spondeios, from spondē a ritual libation; from the use of spondee in the music that characteristically accompanied such ceremonies]

spon•dee

(ˈspɒn di)

n.
a foot of two syllables, both of which are long in quantitative meter or stressed in accentual meter.
[1350–1400; Middle English sponde < Latin spondēus < Greek spondeîos, derivative of spondḗ libation (spondees were a feature of hymns sung during libations)]

spondee

a foot of two syllables, both long or stressed. — spondiac, adj.
See also: Verse

spondee

A metrical foot of two syllables, both accented.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.spondee - a metrical unit with stressed-stressed syllables
metrical foot, metrical unit, foot - (prosody) a group of 2 or 3 syllables forming the basic unit of poetic rhythm
Translations
kaksipitkäspondee

spondee

[ˈspɒndiː] Nespondeo m

spondee

nSpondeus m
References in classic literature ?
Pain is always by the side of joy, the spondee by the dactyl.
The abbe, who was quite innocent of Latin, nodded his head, in cadence, at every roll which La Fontaine impressed upon his body, according to the undulations of the dactyls and spondees.
Dactyls, feet and spondee are terms used in discussing which art form?
Indeed if stress is relative, then a spondee is, to use Wimsatt and Beardsley's phrasing, "illusory," because "it is impossible to pronounce any two successive syllables in English without some rise or fall of stress--and some rise or fall of stress is all that is needed for a metrical ictus" (158).
The "dark men" spondee emphasizes aurally this shift in attitude.
But the line again picks up momentum with the spondee (the double heartbeat of "forward"), only to again be slowed down by two dactyls ("running in place when it").
The spondee "a 1 day" is a strong rhythmic interruption doubled with the alliteration in "silver strife" and yet softened by its sibilants.
Swinburne wrote of Browning, "Actually the writer has made three long heavy full syllables--equivalent properly to a spondee and a half serve as equivalent to a single anapest.
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Another possibility is that Lewis thought at the time that a spondee closing a line could be substituted for two iambic feet; cf.
13) As Fantham points out, 'Augustus' is a molossus, admissible in Horatian lyric unless it is nominative before an initial vowel, or vocative, while 'Caesar' is an easy spondee, and dactylic in ablative or genitive before a vowel (Caesaris aras).
The verse form that evolved to narrate Greek epic poetry is the dactylic hexameter: five dactyls, for which a spondee may substitute, and a final spondee or trochee in the last foot.