spongy


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spong·y

 (spŭn′jē)
adj. spong·i·er, spong·i·est
Resembling a sponge in elasticity, absorbency, or porousness.

spong′i·ness n.

spongy

(ˈspʌndʒɪ)
adj, -gier or -giest
1. of or resembling a sponge, esp in texture, porosity, elasticity, or compressibility: spongy bread; spongy bone.
2. of or like a sponge in respect of its capacity to absorb fluid and yield it when compressed
ˈspongily adv
ˈsponginess n

spon•gy

(ˈspʌn dʒi)

adj. -gi•er, -gi•est.
1. of the nature of or resembling a sponge; light, porous, or readily compressible.
2. having the absorbent characteristics of a sponge.
3. of or pertaining to a sponge.
4. porous but hard, as bone.
[1530–40]
spon′gi•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.spongy - easily squashed; resembling a sponge in having soft porous texture and compressibility; "spongy bread"
soft - yielding readily to pressure or weight
2.spongy - like a sponge in being able to absorb liquids and yield it back when compressed
absorbent, absorptive - having power or capacity or tendency to absorb or soak up something (liquids or energy etc.); "as absorbent as a sponge"

spongy

adjective porous, light, absorbent, springy, cushioned, elastic, cushiony The earth was spongy from rain.

spongy

adjective
Yielding easily to pressure or weight; not firm:
Translations
إسْفَنْجي، لَيِّن
houbovitý
blød
szivacsos
svampkenndur
sünger gibi

spongy

[ˈspʌndʒɪ] ADJ (spongier (compar) (spongiest (superl))) → esponjoso

spongy

[ˈspʌndʒi] adj [ground] → spongieux/euse

spongy

adj (+er)nachgiebig, weich; (= light) puddinglocker; skin etcschwammig

spongy

[ˈspʌndʒɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) → spugnoso/a

sponge

(spandʒ) noun
1. a type of sea animal, or its soft skeleton, which has many holes and is able to suck up and hold water.
2. a piece of such a skeleton or a substitute, used for washing the body etc.
3. a sponge pudding or cake. We had jam sponge for dessert.
4. an act of wiping etc with a sponge. Give the table a quick sponge over, will you?
verb
1. to wipe or clean with a sponge. She sponged the child's face.
2. to get a living, money etc (from someone else). He's been sponging off/on us for years.
ˈsponger noun
a person who lives by sponging on others.
ˈspongy adjective
soft and springy or holding water like a sponge. spongy ground.
ˈspongily adverb
ˈsponginess noun
sponge cake, sponge pudding
(a) very light cake or pudding made from flour, eggs and sugar etc.

spong·y

a. esponjoso-a; poroso-a.
References in classic literature ?
Where ye are, there must always be dregs at hand, and much that is spongy, hollow, and compressed: it wanteth to have freedom.
It was a wild, forsaken road, now winding through dreary pine barrens, where the wind whispered mournfully, and now over log causeways, through long cypress swamps, the doleful trees rising out of the slimy, spongy ground, hung with long wreaths of funeral black moss, while ever and anon the loathsome form of the mocassin snake might be seen sliding among broken stumps and shattered branches that lay here and there, rotting in the water.
A little beyond the ruins about the smashed handling-machine I came upon the red weed again, and found the Regent's Canal, a spongy mass of dark-red vegetation.
At first, Toby with a degree of fastidiousness that seemed to me ill-timed, was for picking out the minute particles of tobacco with which the spongy mass was mixed; but against this proceeding I protested, as by such an operation we must have greatly diminished its quantity.
Then he went back to the carcass of the elephant, which had fallen only about a hundred feet from the edge of the forest; he next proceeded adroitly to cut off the trunk, which might have been two feet in diameter at the base; of this he selected the most delicate portion, and then took with it one of the animal's spongy feet.
Mile after mile of stunted trees: some hewn down by the axe, some blown down by the wind, some half fallen and resting on their neighbours, many mere logs half hidden in the swamp, others mouldered away to spongy chips.
From the old and sprouting nuts she took the solid, spongy centres and turned them into salads.
The water, which was clear enough on the open sandy side, where the sun shone, looked black and poisonous opposite to me, where it lay deeper under the shade of the spongy banks, and the rank overhanging thickets and tangled trees.
It looked rather spongy and soppy, I thought, as I carried my eye over the great dull waste that lay across the river; and I could not help wondering, if the world were really as round as my geography book said, how any part of it came to be so flat.
There were other lumps and festoons and things like decayed tree-trunks studded on the face of the rock, the old combs of past years, or new cities built in the shadow of the windless gorge, and huge masses of spongy, rotten trash had rolled down and stuck among the trees and creepers that clung to the rock- face.
There were four protruding fingers and a horrid red, spongy surface where the thumb should have been.
A Kolkata-based confectioner named Nobin Chandra Das is known to be the inventor of the popular spongy white Banglar Rasogolla in 1868.