spontaneous generation


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spontaneous generation

spontaneous generation

n
(Biology) a theory, widely held in the 19th century and earlier but now discredited, stating that living organisms could arise directly and rapidly from nonliving material. Also called: abiogenesis

a•bi•o•gen•e•sis

(ˌeɪ baɪ oʊˈdʒɛn ə sɪs, ˌæb i oʊ-)

n.
the production of living organisms by nonliving matter; spontaneous generation: a former belief.
(a-6 + biogenesis; coined by T. H. Huxley in 1870]
a`bi•o•ge•net′ic (-dʒəˈnɛt ɪk) a`bi•o•ge•net′i•cal, adj.
a`bi•o•ge•net′i•cal•ly, adv.
a`bi•og′e•nist (-ˈɒdʒ ə nɪst) n.

spontaneous generation

abiogenesis.
See also: Life
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.spontaneous generation - a hypothetical organic phenomenon by which living organisms are created from nonliving matterspontaneous generation - a hypothetical organic phenomenon by which living organisms are created from nonliving matter
organic phenomenon - (biology) a natural phenomenon involving living plants and animals
References in periodicals archive ?
Our pupils should learn that a molecules-to-man evolutionary belief demands that one believe in spontaneous generation - something proven to be impossible.
Spontaneous Generation of Infectious Prion Disease in Transgenic Mice
Creatures Born of Mud and Slime: The Wonder and Complexity of Spontaneous Generation
Figure 6(a) shows that a fast speed of spontaneous generation results in a great number of the pessimistic subjects.
Piero's thematic consistency even bridges different categories of image, from the sacred to the non-sacred--the theme of the spontaneous generation of living things is manifest in the tadpoles of the Toledo painting, here providing a 'natural metaphor' for the Virgin birth.
There is a parallel here to biological processes--the repetition with variation that is the principle mechanism of evolution--and such resonances are all the stronger when one considers Adibi's interest in the notion of the spontaneous generation of life from inanimate matter (see, for example, Abiogenesis, 2009, or, less specifically, any of a number of works made with a precise shade of pistachio green that brings forth the otherwise imperceptible red in the unprimed beige fabric, animating chroma).
Pasteur explained that he was disinclined to agree with the doctrine of spontaneous generation because his experiments with fermentation had showed that cultures of yeast could be killed (i.
Pasteur in 1864 wrote the final obituary to the doctrine of spontaneous generation.
11 to a close reading and argues (contra Lennox) that even in the case of spontaneous generation there is an actualization of an irreducible potentiality, that which is found in "vital" heat.
He considers the bureaucratization of France's vibrant scientific community through the national university system and an increasingly competitive labor-market in credentialed scientists; the question of ethical values inculcated by science, such as materialism and the repudiation of religious authority; the "radical synthesis" of positivism with "evolution by natural selection, the spontaneous generation of life, and polygenist doctrines on the multiplicity of the human races"; and how 19th-century French scientists "interacted with concerns that far transcended the strictly drawn boundaries of scientists' quest for an understanding and mastery of nature.
Merian went on to describe life cycles of as many as 186 insect species, amassing evidence that opposed the notion of the time that insects were "born of mud" by spontaneous generation.

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