spontaneously


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spon·ta·ne·ous

 (spŏn-tā′nē-əs)
adj.
1. Happening or arising without apparent external cause; self-generated: a microorganism capable of spontaneous movement.
2. Arising from a natural inclination or impulse and not from forethought or prompting: spontaneous laughter; a spontaneous protest.
3. Unconstrained and unstudied in manner or behavior: a spontaneous personality.
4. Growing without cultivation or human labor: spontaneous vegetation.

[From Late Latin spontāneus, of one's own accord, from Latin sponte; see (s)pen- in Indo-European roots.]

spon·ta′ne·ous·ly adv.
spon·ta′ne·ous·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.spontaneously - in a spontaneous manner; "this shift occurs spontaneously"
2.spontaneously - without advance preparation; "he spoke ad lib"

spontaneously

adverb
1. voluntarily, freely, instinctively, impromptu, off the cuff (informal), on impulse, impulsively, in the heat of the moment, extempore, off your own bat, of your own accord, quite unprompted Her husband was never spontaneously warm or friendly towards us.
2. automatically, instinctively, involuntarily, unthinkingly These images surface spontaneously in dreams.

spontaneously

adverb
Of one's own free will:
Idioms: of one's own accord, on one's own volition.
Translations
بِتِلقائِيَّه، بِعَفْوِيَّه
z vlastní vůle
itsestäänspontaanisti
spontano
önkéntsaját jószántábólspontán módon
af sjálfsdáîum; ósjálfrátt
spontánne

spontaneously

[spɒnˈteɪnɪəslɪ] ADVespontáneamente

spontaneously

[spɒnˈteɪniəsli] advspontanément

spontaneously

advspontan; (= voluntarily also)von sich aus, von selbst; to combust spontaneouslysich selbst entzünden

spontaneously

[spɒnˈteɪnɪəslɪ] advspontaneamente

spontaneous

(spənˈteiniəs) adjective
1. said, done etc of one's own free will without pressure from others. His offer was quite spontaneous.
2. natural; not forced. spontaneous behaviour.
sponˈtaneously adverb
sponˈtaneousness noun
spontaneity (spontəˈneiəti) , (spontəˈniːəti) noun
References in classic literature ?
The minister -- for, save the long-sought regards of woman, nothing is sweeter than these marks of childish preference, accorded spontaneously by a spiritual instinct, and therefore seeming to imply in us something truly worthy to be loved -- the minister looked round, laid his hand on the child's head, hesitated an instant, and then kissed her brow.
The latter was the eternal, living principle or soul in him; and in sleep, being for the time dissociated from the characterizing mind, which at other times employed it for its outer vehicle or agent, it spontaneously sought escape from the scorching contiguity of the frantic thing, of which, for the time, it was no longer an integral.
I had not intended to love him; the reader knows I had wrought hard to extirpate from my soul the germs of love there detected; and now, at the first renewed view of him, they spontaneously arrived, green and strong
You needn't bespeak contempt, Linton: anybody will have it spontaneously at your service.
But she put them far less spontaneously, far less adroitly, than usual.
But, in the then condition of my mind, where the play was still running high, his former protection of me appeared so deserving of my gratitude, and my old love for him overflowed my breast so freshly and spontaneously, that I went up to him at once, with a fast-beating heart, and said:
But then, as Herbert changed the bandages, more by the light of the fire than by the outer light, he went back to it spontaneously.
She rejoined her companions in the great hall of the mansion, where they were assembled after study for "recreation," a noisy process which always set in spontaneously when the professors withdrew.
Nor does this inability arise from want of organs: for we observe that magpies and parrots can utter words like ourselves, and are yet unable to speak as we do, that is, so as to show that they understand what they say; in place of which men born deaf and dumb, and thus not less, but rather more than the brutes, destitute of the organs which others use in speaking, are in the habit of spontaneously inventing certain signs by which they discover their thoughts to those who, being usually in their company, have leisure to learn their language.
They must have reflected, that in all great changes of established governments, forms ought to give way to substance; that a rigid adherence in such cases to the former, would render nominal and nugatory the transcendent and precious right of the people to "abolish or alter their governments as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness,"[2] since it is impossible for the people spontaneously and universally to move in concert towards their object; and it is therefore essential that such changes be instituted by some INFORMAL AND UNAUTHORIZED PROPOSITIONS, made by some patriotic and respectable citizen or number of citizens.
I felt a mighty power fly along my arm, and it was without surprise that I saw the monster cower back before a similar movement made spontaneously by each one of us.
Its sides cannot yield; it coheres spontaneously, and not by the closeness of its rivets; and its perfect union of the materials enables it to defy the roughest seas.

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