spoof


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Related to spoof: Spoof Email

spoof

 (spo͞of)
n.
1. A satirical imitation; a parody or send-up.
2. A deception or ruse.
tr.v. spoofed, spoof·ing, spoofs
1. To do a spoof of; satirize.
2. To play a trick on; deceive.
3. Computers To assume or emulate the identity of (another user or device) in order to gain access to a system.

[After Spoof, name of a game involving trickery and nonsense invented by Arthur Roberts (1852-1933), British comedian.]

spoof

(spuːf)
n
1. a mildly satirical mockery or parody; lampoon: a spoof on party politics.
2. a good-humoured deception or trick; prank
vb
3. to indulge in a spoof of (a person or thing)
4. (Computer Science) to communicate electronically under a false identity
[C19: coined by A. Roberts (1852–1933), English comedian, to designate a game of his own invention]
ˈspoofer n

spoof

(spuf)

n.
1. a light-hearted imitation of someone or something; lampoon or parody.
2. a hoax; prank.
v.t.
3. to mock (something or someone) lightly and good-humoredly; kid.
4. to fool by a hoax.
v.i.
5. to scoff at something lightly and good-humoredly; kid.
[1885–90; after a game invented and named by Arthur Roberts (1852–1933), British comedian]

spoof


Past participle: spoofed
Gerund: spoofing

Imperative
spoof
spoof
Present
I spoof
you spoof
he/she/it spoofs
we spoof
you spoof
they spoof
Preterite
I spoofed
you spoofed
he/she/it spoofed
we spoofed
you spoofed
they spoofed
Present Continuous
I am spoofing
you are spoofing
he/she/it is spoofing
we are spoofing
you are spoofing
they are spoofing
Present Perfect
I have spoofed
you have spoofed
he/she/it has spoofed
we have spoofed
you have spoofed
they have spoofed
Past Continuous
I was spoofing
you were spoofing
he/she/it was spoofing
we were spoofing
you were spoofing
they were spoofing
Past Perfect
I had spoofed
you had spoofed
he/she/it had spoofed
we had spoofed
you had spoofed
they had spoofed
Future
I will spoof
you will spoof
he/she/it will spoof
we will spoof
you will spoof
they will spoof
Future Perfect
I will have spoofed
you will have spoofed
he/she/it will have spoofed
we will have spoofed
you will have spoofed
they will have spoofed
Future Continuous
I will be spoofing
you will be spoofing
he/she/it will be spoofing
we will be spoofing
you will be spoofing
they will be spoofing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been spoofing
you have been spoofing
he/she/it has been spoofing
we have been spoofing
you have been spoofing
they have been spoofing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been spoofing
you will have been spoofing
he/she/it will have been spoofing
we will have been spoofing
you will have been spoofing
they will have been spoofing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been spoofing
you had been spoofing
he/she/it had been spoofing
we had been spoofing
you had been spoofing
they had been spoofing
Conditional
I would spoof
you would spoof
he/she/it would spoof
we would spoof
you would spoof
they would spoof
Past Conditional
I would have spoofed
you would have spoofed
he/she/it would have spoofed
we would have spoofed
you would have spoofed
they would have spoofed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.spoof - a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous wayspoof - a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous way
caricature, impersonation, imitation - a representation of a person that is exaggerated for comic effect
Verb1.spoof - make a parody of; "The students spoofed the teachers"
mock - imitate with mockery and derision; "The children mocked their handicapped classmate"
travesty - make a travesty of

spoof

noun (Informal) parody, take-off (informal), satire, caricature, mockery, send-up (Brit. informal), travesty, lampoon, burlesque a spoof on Hollywood life
Translations
غِش، خِداع
karikaturaparodie
parodi
svindli
gáskafengin skopstæling
parodija
alaya almadalga geçme

spoof

[spuːf]
A. N (= parody) → burla f, parodia f; (= hoax) → trampa f, truco m
B. ADJ spoof lettercarta f paródica
C. VT (= parody) → parodiar; (= trick) → engañar
D. VIbromear

spoof

[ˈspuːf]
n
(= parody) → parodie f
a spoof on sth → une parodie de qch
(= hoax) → canular m
modif [film, documentary] → parodique

spoof

(inf)
n
(= parody)Parodie f (→ of auf +acc)
(= hoax)Ulk m (inf), → (April)scherz m (inf)
adj attr poem, programme etcparodiert; versionverballhornt
vt (= parody) novelparodieren; poem alsoverballhornen

spoof

[spuːf] n (fam) → parodia

spoof

(spuːf) noun
a ridiculous imitation, intended to be humorous.
References in periodicals archive ?
The researcher went on to say that one can make multiple incorrect attempts on the fingerprint scanner without providing a password, which means hackers can use one spoof fingerprint after another until they have access to the device.
Nawazuddin Siddiqui donned aviator sunglasses to spoof Salman's Dabangg style while co- actor Zeeshan Quadri, who played the character of Definite, donned Salman's Tere Nm hairstyle and mouthed dialogues from Maine Pyr Kiya .
The comedy, Fifty-One Shades of Maggie - a spoof of the book Fifty Shades of Grey - is to embark on its first UK tour, visiting Newcastle Theatre Royal from September 10 - 14.
Kylie Minogue has teamed up with British artist Katerina Jebb to create a spoof advert, in which she displays her pert posterior.
Quite simply, if you start a spoof, you should expect to get spoofed.
The comedy spoof show goes out tonight at 10pm on Channel 4.
It has the same colours, logos, latest offers and even the same adverts, but the spoof site has replaced details of departure and return dates with a box which reads: "I prefer not to travel during wildcat strikes".
The film never becomes anything of its own, however; it merely jumps from spoof to spoof, often with tenuous transitions.
Of course, it too was a spoof, but we had a serious point in mind.
The spoof news item was read by a newsreader during a discussion on what Britain would be like if it was run by tabloid newspaper editors.
Vine introduced the spoof by saying a news bulletin from "Radio 2 and a Half" followed.
The spoof news item was read out by a newsreader during a discussion on what Britain would be like if it was run by tabloid newspaper editors.