spree


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Spree

 (sprā, shprā)
A river, about 400 km (250 mi) long, of eastern Germany rising near the Czech border and flowing generally north to the Havel River at Berlin.

spree

 (sprē)
n.
1. A sudden indulgence in or outburst of an activity: a shopping spree; a crime spree.
2. A carefree, lively outing.

[Perhaps alteration of Scots spreath, spreagh, cattle stolen in a raid, cattle raid, from Scottish Gaelic sprèidh, cattle, from Middle Irish, ultimately from Latin praeda, booty; see ghend- in Indo-European roots.]

spree

(spriː)
n
1. a session of considerable overindulgence, esp in drinking, squandering money, etc
2. a romp
[C19: perhaps changed from Scottish spreath plundered cattle, ultimately from Latin praeda booty]

spree

(spri)

n.
1. a period or bout of indulgence, as of a craving or whim: an eating spree; a spending spree.
2. a binge; carousal.
3. a period or outburst of activity.
[1795–1805; orig. uncertain]

Spree

(spreɪ, ʃpreɪ)

n.
a river in E Germany, flowing N through Berlin to the Havel River. 220 mi. (354 km) long.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.spree - a brief indulgence of your impulsesspree - a brief indulgence of your impulses
spending spree - a brief period of extravagant spending
intemperateness, self-indulgence, intemperance - excess in action and immoderate indulgence of bodily appetites, especially in passion or indulgence; "the intemperance of their language"
Verb1.spree - engage without restraint in an activity and indulge, as when shopping
pander, gratify, indulge - yield (to); give satisfaction to

spree

noun
1. fling, binge (informal), orgy, splurge They went on a spending spree.
2. binge, bender (informal), orgy, revel (informal), jag (slang), junketing, beano (Brit. slang), debauch, carouse, drinking bout, bacchanalia, carousal, a night on the piss (taboo slang), a night on the razzle (informal) They attacked two London shops after a drinking spree.

spree

noun
1. A drinking bout:
Slang: bat, bender, booze, jag, tear.
2. A period of uncontrolled self-indulgence:
Slang: jag.
Translations
Spree
hoogjoomingpidu

spree

[spriː] Njuerga f, parranda f, farra f (esp S. Cone)
to go on a spreeir de juerga or parranda or (esp S. Cone) farra
to go on a killing spreematar a una serie de personas
see also spending B

spree

[ˈspriː] n
to go on a spree → faire la fête spending spree

spree

n spending or shopping spreeGroßeinkauf m; drinking/gambling spreeZech-/Spieltour f (inf); killing spree (of gunman) → Amoklauf m; to go/be on a spree (drinking) → eine Zechtour machen; (spending) → groß einkaufen gehen/groß einkaufen

spree

[spriː] n (fam) to go on a spending spreefare spese folli
to go on a spree → darsi alla pazza gioia, fare baldoria
References in classic literature ?
Oh, my name it is Johnny from Pike, I'm h-ll on a spree or a strike" .
Why, sold off in a jiffy, and no character, and I might find myself slaved about under a butcher's boy, or worked to death at some seaside place where no one cared for me, except to find out how fast I could go, or be flogged along in some cart with three or four great men in it going out for a Sunday spree, as I have often seen in the place I lived in before I came here; no," said he, shaking his head, "I hope I shall never come to that.
Tradition says she spent the last two years of her life in the strange den I have been speaking of, after having indulged herself in one final, triumphant, and satisfying spree.
They knew well enough that the raftsmen were all down at the village laying in stores or having a spree, but still that was no excuse for their conducting this thing in an unpiratical way.
I'm sorry for Mister Bluebeard, I'm sorry to cause him pain; But a terrible spree there's sure to be When he comes back again.
Right away from a jolly good spree," he said, "by the London train--see?
Folks'll say I've gone crazy when they see my building spree, but I know what I'm about.
They would put up in one of the lodging-houses in John Street; Philip had never been to Oxford, but Griffiths had talked to him about it so much that he knew exactly where they would go; and they would dine at the Clarendon: Griffiths had been in the habit of dining there when he went on the spree.
Just one good spree for myself and the missus, giving pleasure to ourselves and employment to others, and satisfaction to you to think it's not been throwed away.
The LONDON JOURNAL duke always has his "little place" at Maidenhead; and the heroine of the three-volume novel always dines there when she goes out on the spree with somebody else's husband.
I wonder you waste time coming over here on the spree when you've got a piece of business like that to look after.
For the rest, after his hours of work, a casual stroll or a casual spree on shore suffices to unfold for him the secret of a whole continent, and generally he finds the secret not worth knowing.