sprung


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sprung

 (sprŭng)
v.
A past tense and the past participle of spring.

sprung

(sprʌŋ)
vb
the past participle and a past tense of spring

spring

(sprɪŋ)

v. sprang or, often, sprung; sprung; spring•ing; v.i.
1. to rise, leap, or move suddenly and swiftly: a tiger about to spring.
2. to be released suddenly from a constrained position: The door sprang open.
3. to issue forth suddenly or forcefully: Oil sprang from the well.
4. to come into being; arise: Industries sprang up in the suburbs.
5. to have as one's birth or lineage: to spring from seafaring folk.
6. to extend upward.
7. to take an upward course or curve from a point of support, as an arch.
8. to occur suddenly: An objection sprang to mind.
9. to become bent or warped.
v.t.
10. to cause to spring.
11. to cause the sudden operation of: to spring a trap.
12. to cause to work loose, warp, or split: Moisture sprang the board from the fence.
13. to undergo the development of: sprang a leak.
14. to bend by force.
15. to produce by surprise: to spring a joke.
16. to leap over.
17. Slang. to secure the release of from confinement.
18. spring for, Informal. to pay for; treat someone to.
n.
19. an act of springing; a sudden leap or bound.
20. an elastic quality: a spring in his walk.
21. a structural defect caused by a warp or crack.
22. an issue of water from the ground.
23. the place of such an issue: mineral springs.
24. a source; fountainhead: a spring of inspiration.
25. an elastic contrivance or body, as a strip or wire of steel coiled spirally, that recovers its shape after being compressed, bent, or stretched.
26. the season between winter and summer, marked by the budding and growth of plants and the onset of warmer weather: in the Northern Hemisphere from the March equinox to the June solstice; in the Southern Hemisphere from the September equinox to the December solstice.
27. the first stage and freshest period: the spring of life.
28. Also called springing.
a. the point at which an arch or dome rises from its support.
b. the rise or the angle of the rise of an arch.
[before 900; Old English springan, c. Old Frisian springa, Old Saxon, Old High German springan, Old Norse springa; (n.) Old English spring issue of a stream, c. Middle Low German, Old High German spring]
Translations
قَفّاز، نابِض
pérový
rugós
meî fjöîrum
pružinový
yaylı

sprung

[sprʌŋ]
A. PP of spring
B. ADJ interior sprung mattresscolchón m de muelles
sprung bedcama f de muelles
sprung seatasiento m de ballesta

sprung

ptp of spring
adjgefedert; a well-sprung mattresseine gut gefederte Matratze

sprung

[sprʌŋ]
1. pp of spring
2. adj (seat, mattress) → a molle
interior-sprung mattress → materasso a molle

spring

(spriŋ) past tense sprang (spraŋ) : past participle sprung (spraŋ) verb
1. to jump, leap or move swiftly (usually upwards). She sprang into the boat.
2. to arise or result from. His bravery springs from his love of adventure.
3. to (cause a trap to) close violently. The trap must have sprung when the hare stepped in it.
noun
1. a coil of wire or other similar device which can be compressed or squeezed down but returns to its original shape when released. a watch-spring; the springs in a chair.
2. the season of the year between winter and summer when plants begin to flower or grow leaves. Spring is my favourite season.
3. a leap or sudden movement. The lion made a sudden spring on its prey.
4. the ability to stretch and spring back again. There's not a lot of spring in this old trampoline.
5. a small stream flowing out from the ground.
ˈspringy adjective
1. able to spring back into its former shape. The grass is very springy.
2. having spring. These floorboards are springy.
ˈspringiness noun
sprung (sprŋa) adjective
having springs. a sprung mattress.
ˈspringboard noun
1. a springy type of diving-board.
2. a board on which gymnasts jump before vaulting.
spring cleaning
thorough cleaning of a house etc especially in spring.
ˈspringtime noun
the season of spring.
spring up
to develop or appear suddenly. New buildings are springing up everywhere.
References in classic literature ?
This rise and fall of Walden at long intervals serves this use at least; the water standing at this great height for a year or more, though it makes it difficult to walk round it, kills the shrubs and trees which have sprung up about its edge since the last rise -- pitch pines, birches, alders, aspens, and others -- and, falling again, leaves an unobstructed shore; for, unlike many ponds and all waters which are subject to a daily tide, its shore is cleanest when the water is lowest.
sprang \'spra[tailed n]\ or sprung \'spr[schwa][tailed n]\