spun


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spun

 (spŭn)
v.
Past tense and past participle of spin.

spun

(spʌn)
vb
the past tense and past participle of spin
adj
formed or manufactured by spinning: spun gold; spun glass.

spin

(spɪn)

v. spun, spin•ning,
n. v.t.
1. to make (yarn) by drawing out, twisting, and winding fibers.
2. to form (the fibers of any material) into thread or yarn.
3. to produce (a thread, web, cocoon, etc.) by extruding from the body a viscous filament that hardens in the air.
4. to cause to rotate rapidly; twirl; whirl: to spin a coin on a table.
5. to produce, fabricate, or evolve in a manner suggestive of spinning thread: to spin a tale.
6. to draw out, protract, or prolong (often fol. by out): She spun the project out for over three years.
7. Slang. to cause to have a particular bias; influence in a certain direction: His assignment was to spin the reporters after the president's speech.
v.i.
8. to revolve or rotate rapidly, as the earth or a top.
9. to produce a thread from the body, as a spider or silkworm.
10. to produce yarn or thread by spinning.
11. to move or travel rapidly.
12. to have a sensation of whirling; reel: My head began to spin.
13. to fish with a spinning or revolving bait.
14. spin off, to create or derive, based on something already existing: They took the character of the uncle and spun off another TV series.
n.
15. the act of causing a spinning or whirling motion.
16. a spinning motion or movement.
17. a downward movement or trend, esp. one that is sudden, alarming, etc.
18. a short ride or drive for pleasure.
19. Slang. a particular viewpoint or bias, esp. in the media; slant: They tried to put a favorable spin on the news coverage of the controversial speech.
20. Also called tailspin. the descent of an aircraft, nose-down, in a helical path.
21. Physics. the intrinsic angular momentum characterizing each kind of elementary particle, having one of the values 0, ½, 1, 3/2, … when measured in units of Planck's constant divided by 2π.
Idioms:
spin one's wheels, to waste one's efforts.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English spinnan, c. Old Frisian, Old Norse spinna, Middle Low German, Old High German spinnen, Gothic spinnan]
syn: See turn.
Translations

spun

[spʌn]
A. PT & PP of spin
B. ADJ spun glasslana f de vidrio
spun silkseda f hilada
spun yarnmeollar m

spun

pret, ptp of spin
adj gold, silver, silkgesponnen; spun sugar (= candyfloss)Zuckerwatte f

spin

(spin) present participle ˈspinning: past tense, past participle spun (span) verb
1. to (cause to) go round and round rapidly. She spun round in surprise; He spun the revolving door round and round.
2. to form threads from (wool, cotton etc) by drawing out and twisting. The old woman was spinning (wool) in the corner of the room.
noun
1. a whirling or turning motion. The patch of mud sent the car into a spin.
2. a ride, especially on wheels. After lunch we went for a spin in my new car.
ˈspinner noun
a person or thing that spins.
ˌspin-ˈdrier noun
a machine which dries clothes by spinning them round and round and forcing the water out of them.
spin out
to cause to last a long or longer time. He spun out his speech for an extra five minutes.

spun

pret & pp de spin
References in classic literature ?
Had some one spun the top with him, it would have vanished; and presently, no doubt at the bidding of an oath I could not hear, he hurriedly thrust the top into his pocket, and once more joined the straining group of men.
When all had spun themselves to their places, they were about five or six feet apart--and so situated, the entire circle of spinning pagans spun itself three separate times around the room.
They advanced, retreated, struck at one another's hands, clutched at one another's heads, spun round alone, caught one another and spun round in pairs, until many of them dropped.
But it did not matter; the panting shapes spun onwards.
Then she went to the ugly brown spiders, and in gentle words told them, how in Fairy Land their kindred spun all the elfin cloth, and in return the Fairies gave them food, and then how happily they lived among the green leaves, spinning garments for their neigbbors.
The shepherd himself, though he had good reason to believe that the bag held nothing but flaxen thread, or else the long rolls of strong linen spun from that thread, was not quite sure that this trade of weaving, indispensable though it was, could be carried on entirely without the help of the Evil One.