squalid


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to squalid: inadvertently

squal·id

 (skwŏl′ĭd)
adj.
1. Dirty or deteriorated, especially from poverty or lack of care. See Synonyms at dirty.
2. Morally repulsive; sordid: "the squalid atmosphere of intrigue, betrayal, and counterbetrayal" (W. Bruce Lincoln).

[Latin squālidus, from squālēre, to be filthy, from squālus, filthy.]

squal′id·ly adv.
squal′id·ness, squa·lid′i·ty (skwŏ-lĭd′ĭ-tē) n.

squalid

(ˈskwɒlɪd)
adj
1. dirty and repulsive, esp as a result of neglect or poverty
2. sordid
[C16: from Latin squālidus, from squālēre to be stiff with dirt]
squalidity, ˈsqualidness n
ˈsqualidly adv

squal•id

(ˈskwɒl ɪd, ˈskwɔ lɪd)

adj.
1. filthy and repulsive, as from neglect.
2. degraded; sordid.
[1585–95; < Latin squālidus dirty <squāl(ēre) to be dirty + -idus -id4]
squal′id•ly, adv.
squal′id•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.squalid - morally degraded; "a seedy district"; "the seamy side of life"; "sleazy characters hanging around casinos"; "sleazy storefronts with...dirt on the walls"- Seattle Weekly; "the sordid details of his orgies stank under his very nostrils"- James Joyce; "the squalid atmosphere of intrigue and betrayal"
disreputable - lacking respectability in character or behavior or appearance
2.squalid - foul and run-down and repulsive; "a flyblown bar on the edge of town"; "a squalid overcrowded apartment in the poorest part of town"; "squalid living conditions"; "sordid shantytowns"
dirty, soiled, unclean - soiled or likely to soil with dirt or grime; "dirty unswept sidewalks"; "a child in dirty overalls"; "dirty slums"; "piles of dirty dishes"; "put his dirty feet on the clean sheet"; "wore an unclean shirt"; "mining is a dirty job"; "Cinderella did the dirty work while her sisters preened themselves"

squalid

squalid

adjective
1. Heavily soiled; very dirty or unclean:
2. Having or proceeding from low moral standards:
Translations
zaneřáděný
beskidt
sóîalegur
netīrsnolaists
bakımsızpis

squalid

[ˈskwɒlɪd] ADJ
1. (= dirty) → miserable, vil
2. (= base) [affair] → asqueroso; [motive] → vil

squalid

[ˈskwɒlɪd] adj
[room, bedsit, conditions] → sordide
[behaviour, affair] → sordide

squalid

adj room, houseschmutzig und verwahrlost; existence, conditionselend, erbärmlich; motive, manoeuvres, deed, idea etcgemein, niederträchtig; experienceübel; dispute, gossipentwürdigend; affairschmutzig

squalid

[ˈskwɒlɪd] adjsquallido/a, sordido/a

squalid

(ˈskwolid) adjective
very dirty or filthy. The houses are squalid and overcrowded.
ˈsqualor (-lə) noun
They lived in squalor.
References in classic literature ?
Sometimes a group of squalid old crones, squatting in a file under the shadow of the steps to a porch, scolded noisily as the archdeacon and the bellringer passed, and tossed them this encouraging welcome, with a curse: "Hum
I saw a little mite sitting on a doorstep in a Soho slum one night, and I shall never forget the look that the gas-lamp showed me on its wizen face--a look of dull despair, as if from the squalid court the vista of its own squalid life had risen, ghostlike, and struck its heart dead with horror.
Then all is blank; and afterward the rains beat against the grimy window-panes, or the snows fall upon my scant attire, the wheels rattle in the squalid streets where my life lies in poverty and mean employment.
Straggling upon the outskirts were the thatched huts of natives, picturesque in their primeval savagery, harmonizing with the background of tropical jungle and accentuating the squalid hideousness of the white man's pioneer architecture.
The hereditary French holiday spirit of the French voyageurs is hardly to be depressed by any adversities; and they can manage to get up a fete in the most squalid situations, and under the most untoward circumstances.
He gazed blankly about the kitchen, which looked cold and squalid in the rainy winter twilight.
Nazareth is forlorn; about that ford of Jordan where the hosts of Israel entered the Promised Land with songs of rejoicing, one finds only a squalid camp of fantastic Bedouins of the desert; Jericho the accursed, lies a moldering ruin, to-day, even as Joshua's miracle left it more than three thousand years ago; Bethlehem and Bethany, in their poverty and their humiliation, have nothing about them now to remind one that they once knew the high honor of the Saviour's presence; the hallowed spot where the shepherds watched their flocks by night, and where the angels sang Peace on earth, good will to men, is untenanted by any living creature, and unblessed by any feature that is pleasant to the eye.
What might appear sordid and squalid to the fastidiously reared, was to them eminently wholesome and natural.
I heard of the division of property, of immense wealth and squalid poverty, of rank, descent, and noble blood.
The poverty-stricken street, the squalid mob round the door, swam before his eyes.
In both, there were several knots of loungers, squalid and miserable, but now with a manifest sense of power enthroned on their distress.
They first passed through the "black town," with its narrow streets, its miserable, dirty huts, and squalid population; then through the "European town," which presented a relief in its bright brick mansions, shaded by coconut-trees and bristling with masts, where, although it was early morning, elegantly dressed horsemen and handsome equipages were passing back and forth.