squalid


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Related to squalid: inadvertently

squal·id

 (skwŏl′ĭd)
adj.
1. Dirty or deteriorated, especially from poverty or lack of care. See Synonyms at dirty.
2. Morally repulsive; sordid: "the squalid atmosphere of intrigue, betrayal, and counterbetrayal" (W. Bruce Lincoln).

[Latin squālidus, from squālēre, to be filthy, from squālus, filthy.]

squal′id·ly adv.
squal′id·ness, squa·lid′i·ty (skwŏ-lĭd′ĭ-tē) n.

squalid

(ˈskwɒlɪd)
adj
1. dirty and repulsive, esp as a result of neglect or poverty
2. sordid
[C16: from Latin squālidus, from squālēre to be stiff with dirt]
squalidity, ˈsqualidness n
ˈsqualidly adv

squal•id

(ˈskwɒl ɪd, ˈskwɔ lɪd)

adj.
1. filthy and repulsive, as from neglect.
2. degraded; sordid.
[1585–95; < Latin squālidus dirty <squāl(ēre) to be dirty + -idus -id4]
squal′id•ly, adv.
squal′id•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.squalid - morally degraded; "a seedy district"; "the seamy side of life"; "sleazy characters hanging around casinos"; "sleazy storefronts with...dirt on the walls"- Seattle Weekly; "the sordid details of his orgies stank under his very nostrils"- James Joyce; "the squalid atmosphere of intrigue and betrayal"
disreputable - lacking respectability in character or behavior or appearance
2.squalid - foul and run-down and repulsive; "a flyblown bar on the edge of town"; "a squalid overcrowded apartment in the poorest part of town"; "squalid living conditions"; "sordid shantytowns"
dirty, soiled, unclean - soiled or likely to soil with dirt or grime; "dirty unswept sidewalks"; "a child in dirty overalls"; "dirty slums"; "piles of dirty dishes"; "put his dirty feet on the clean sheet"; "wore an unclean shirt"; "mining is a dirty job"; "Cinderella did the dirty work while her sisters preened themselves"

squalid

squalid

adjective
1. Heavily soiled; very dirty or unclean:
2. Having or proceeding from low moral standards:
Translations
zaneřáděný
beskidt
sóîalegur
netīrsnolaists
bakımsızpis

squalid

[ˈskwɒlɪd] ADJ
1. (= dirty) → miserable, vil
2. (= base) [affair] → asqueroso; [motive] → vil

squalid

[ˈskwɒlɪd] adj
[room, bedsit, conditions] → sordide
[behaviour, affair] → sordide

squalid

adj room, houseschmutzig und verwahrlost; existence, conditionselend, erbärmlich; motive, manoeuvres, deed, idea etcgemein, niederträchtig; experienceübel; dispute, gossipentwürdigend; affairschmutzig

squalid

[ˈskwɒlɪd] adjsquallido/a, sordido/a

squalid

(ˈskwolid) adjective
very dirty or filthy. The houses are squalid and overcrowded.
ˈsqualor (-lə) noun
They lived in squalor.
References in classic literature ?
When his way homeward led him again into the street of frame houses he could not bear the sight and began to run, wanting to get quickly out of the neighborhood that now seemed to him utterly squalid and commonplace.
The squalid and withered person of this hag might well have obtained for her the character of possessing more than human cunning.
The life of the long and busy day--spent in occupations that might so easily have taken a squalid and ugly aspect--had been made pleasant, and even lovely, by the spontaneous grace with which these homely duties seemed to bloom out of her character; so that labor, while she dealt with it, had the easy and flexible charm of play.
To toil long hours for another's advantage; to live in mean and squalid homes, to work in dangerous and unhealthful places; to wrestle with the specters of hunger and privation, to take your chances of accident, disease, and death.
They will find it an excellent thing to get up an appetite with, in the dispiriting presence of the squalid table d'ho^te.
The poverty-stricken street, the squalid mob round the door, swam before his eyes.
Those who had been greedy with the staves of the cask, had acquired a tigerish smear about the mouth; and one tall joker so besmirched, his head more out of a long squalid bag of a nightcap than in it, scrawled upon a wall with his finger dipped in muddy wine-lees--BLOOD.
Straggling upon the outskirts were the thatched huts of natives, picturesque in their primeval savagery, harmonizing with the background of tropical jungle and accentuating the squalid hideousness of the white man's pioneer architecture.
They first passed through the "black town," with its narrow streets, its miserable, dirty huts, and squalid population; then through the "European town," which presented a relief in its bright brick mansions, shaded by coconut-trees and bristling with masts, where, although it was early morning, elegantly dressed horsemen and handsome equipages were passing back and forth.
For how, sir, shall you be able to learn whether or no I am superior to others of my sex both in goodness of heart and understanding, if I let you dine in my cloisters squalid and ill clad?
As he drew back, ashamed of his outward poverty, yet proud of the secret wealth within his grasp, a haughty smile shone out on Peter's visage, with precisely the effect of the dim sunbeams in the squalid chamber.
The sight of one was sufficient, at any time, to throw them into a paroxysm of eagerness and delight; and they were ready to give anything they had for the smallest fragment in which they might behold their squalid features.