squall


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squall 1

 (skwôl)
n.
A loud, harsh cry.
intr.v. squalled, squall·ing, squalls
To scream or cry loudly and harshly.

[Probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse skvala, to squeal.]

squall′er n.

squall 2

 (skwôl)
n.
1. A brief sudden violent windstorm, often accompanied by rain or snow.
2. Informal A brief commotion.
intr.v. squalled, squall·ing, squalls
To blow strongly for a brief period.

[Probably of Scandinavian origin.]

squall′y adj.

squall

(skwɔːl)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a sudden strong wind or brief turbulent storm
2. any sudden commotion or show of temper
vb
(Physical Geography) (intr) to blow in a squall
[C18: perhaps a special use of squall2]
ˈsquallish adj
ˈsqually adj

squall

(skwɔːl)
vb
(intr) to cry noisily; yell
n
a shrill or noisy yell or howl
[C17: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Icelandic skvala to shout; see squeal]
ˈsqualler n

squall1

(skwɔl)

n.
1. a sudden, violent wind, often accompanied by rain, snow, or sleet.
2. a sudden disturbance or commotion.
v.i.
3. to blow as a squall.
[1690–1700; perhaps identical with squall2]
squall′ish, adj.

squall2

(skwɔl)

v.i.
1. to cry or scream loudly.
n.
2. the act or sound of squalling.
[1625–35; perhaps < Old Norse skvala shriek, cry]
squall′er, n.

squall

(skwôl)
A brief, sudden, violent windstorm, often accompanied by rain or snow.

squall

- A violent wind that comes in suddenly, but does not last long, and is often accompanied by rain or snow.
See also related terms for suddenly.

squall


Past participle: squalled
Gerund: squalling

Imperative
squall
squall
Present
I squall
you squall
he/she/it squalls
we squall
you squall
they squall
Preterite
I squalled
you squalled
he/she/it squalled
we squalled
you squalled
they squalled
Present Continuous
I am squalling
you are squalling
he/she/it is squalling
we are squalling
you are squalling
they are squalling
Present Perfect
I have squalled
you have squalled
he/she/it has squalled
we have squalled
you have squalled
they have squalled
Past Continuous
I was squalling
you were squalling
he/she/it was squalling
we were squalling
you were squalling
they were squalling
Past Perfect
I had squalled
you had squalled
he/she/it had squalled
we had squalled
you had squalled
they had squalled
Future
I will squall
you will squall
he/she/it will squall
we will squall
you will squall
they will squall
Future Perfect
I will have squalled
you will have squalled
he/she/it will have squalled
we will have squalled
you will have squalled
they will have squalled
Future Continuous
I will be squalling
you will be squalling
he/she/it will be squalling
we will be squalling
you will be squalling
they will be squalling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been squalling
you have been squalling
he/she/it has been squalling
we have been squalling
you have been squalling
they have been squalling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been squalling
you will have been squalling
he/she/it will have been squalling
we will have been squalling
you will have been squalling
they will have been squalling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been squalling
you had been squalling
he/she/it had been squalling
we had been squalling
you had been squalling
they had been squalling
Conditional
I would squall
you would squall
he/she/it would squall
we would squall
you would squall
they would squall
Past Conditional
I would have squalled
you would have squalled
he/she/it would have squalled
we would have squalled
you would have squalled
they would have squalled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.squall - sudden violent windssquall - sudden violent winds; often accompanied by precipitation
line squall - a squall advancing along a front that forms a definite line
air current, current of air, wind - air moving (sometimes with considerable force) from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure; "trees bent under the fierce winds"; "when there is no wind, row"; "the radioactivity was being swept upwards by the air current and out into the atmosphere"
Verb1.squall - make high-pitched, whiney noises
ululate, wail, yaup, yawl, howl, roar - emit long loud cries; "wail in self-pity"; "howl with sorrow"
2.squall - utter a sudden loud cry; "she cried with pain when the doctor inserted the needle"; "I yelled to her from the window but she couldn't hear me"
call - utter in a loud voice or announce; "He called my name"; "The auctioneer called the bids"
cry out, exclaim, call out, outcry, shout, cry - utter aloud; often with surprise, horror, or joy; "`I won!' he exclaimed"; "`Help!' she cried"; "`I'm here,' the mother shouted when she saw her child looking lost"
hollo - cry hollo
hurrah - shout `hurrah!'
halloo - shout `halloo', as when greeting someone or attracting attention
whoop - shout, as if with joy or enthusiasm; "The children whooped when they were led to the picnic table"
pipe, shriek, shrill, pipe up - utter a shrill cry
let loose, let out, utter, emit - express audibly; utter sounds (not necessarily words); "She let out a big heavy sigh"; "He uttered strange sounds that nobody could understand"
ululate, wail, yaup, yawl, howl, roar - emit long loud cries; "wail in self-pity"; "howl with sorrow"
skreigh, squawk, screak, screech, skreak - utter a harsh abrupt scream
3.squall - blow in a squall; "When it squalls, a prudent sailor reefs his sails"
blow - be blowing or storming; "The wind blew from the West"

squall

noun
1. storm, gale, flurry, blow, rush, blast, breeze, puff, gust The boat was hit by a squall north of the island.
verb
1. wail, cry, howl, bawl, weep, yowl There was an infant squalling at the back of the church.
Translations
عَصْفَة ريح
nápor větru
kastevind
hryîja, vindsveipur
škvalas
vēja brāzma
nápor vetra

squall

1 [skwɔːl] N
1. (= wind) → ráfaga f; (= rain) → chubasco m
2. (fig) → tempestad f
there are squalls aheadel futuro se anuncia no muy tranquilo

squall

2 [skwɔːl]
A. N (= cry) → chillido m, grito m, berrido m
B. VIchillar, gritar, berrear

squall

[ˈskwɔːl]
nrafale f, bourrasque f
vi (= wail) [child] → brailler

squall

n
(= storm)Bö(e) f; (fig)Gewitter nt, → Sturm m; there are squalls ahead (fig)wir gehen stürmischen Zeiten entgegen
(= cry)Schrei m
vischreien

squall

[skwɔːl]
1. n (Met) → bufera, burrasca
2. vi (baby) → strillare, urlare

squall

(skwoːl) noun
a sudden violent wind, eg bringing rain. The ship was struck by a squall.
References in classic literature ?
Yesterday, when Aunt was asleep and I was trying to be as still as a mouse, Polly began to squall and flap about in his cage, so I went to let him out, and found a big spider there.
In cold weather he was distinguished by a fur cap, surmounted with a flaunting fox's tail; and when the folks at a country gathering descried this well-known crest at a distance, whisking about among a squad of hard riders, they always stood by for a squall.
Not much, I replied -- nothing but water; considerable horizon though, and there's a squall coming up, I think.
Yes, and we flipped it at the rate of ten gallons the hour; and when the squall came (for it's squally off there by Patagonia), and all hands --visitors and all --were called to reef topsails, we were so top-heavy that we had to swing each other aloft in bowlines; and we ignorantly furled the skirts of our jackets into the sails, so that we hung there, reefed fast in the howling gale, a warning example to all drunken tars.
He would cry for nothing; he would burst into storms of devilish temper without notice, and let go scream after scream and squall after squall, then climax the thing with "holding his breath"-- that frightful specialty of the teething nursling, in the throes of which the creature exhausts its lungs, then is convulsed with noiseless squirmings and twistings and kickings in the effort to get its breath, while the lips turn blue and the mouth stands wide and rigid, offering for inspection one wee tooth set in the lower rim of a hoop of red gums; and when the appalling stillness has endured until one is sure the lost breath will never return, a nurse comes flying, and dashes water in the child's face, and--presto
When dinner was almost done, the nurse came in with a child of a year old in her arms, who immediately spied me, and began a squall that you might have heard from London-Bridge to Chelsea, after the usual oratory of infants, to get me for a plaything.
A sort of tempest arose on the 3rd of November, the squall knocking the vessel about with fury, and the waves running high.
It was time; the squall was on us, and the vessel began to heel.
We did not get on much further, for in another moment we were caught by a terrific squall from the West that snapped the forestays of the mast so that it fell aft, while all the ship's gear tumbled about at the bottom of the vessel.
When they yield to a squall in a gaunt and naked submission, their tallness is brought best home even to the mind of a seaman.
Tis nothing, I say, but a small matter of a squall that will soon blow over,” continued Benjamin.
Not this time," I repeated, and became aware of the great noise of the wind amongst the trees, with the lashing of a rain squall against the door.