squatter


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squat

 (skwŏt)
v. squat·ted, squat·ting, squats
v.intr.
1. To sit in a crouching position with knees bent and the buttocks on or near the heels.
2. To crouch down, as an animal does.
3. To settle on unoccupied land without legal claim.
4. To occupy a given piece of public land in order to acquire title to it.
v.tr.
1. To put (oneself) into a crouching posture.
2. To occupy as a squatter.
3. Sports To lift (an amount of weight) when doing a squat.
adj. squat·ter, squat·test
1. Short and thick; low and broad.
2. Crouched in a squatting position.
n.
1. The act of squatting.
2. A squatting or crouching posture.
3. Sports A lift or a weightlifting exercise in which one squats and stands while holding a weighted barbell supported by the back of the shoulders.
4. Chiefly British The place occupied by a squatter.
5. The lair of an animal such as a hare.
6. Slang A small or worthless amount; diddly-squat.

[Middle English squatten, from Old French esquatir, to crush : es-, intensive pref. (from Latin ex-; see ex-) + quatir, to press flat (from Vulgar Latin *coāctīre, from Latin coāctus, past participle of cōgere, to compress : co-, co- + agere, to drive; see ag- in Indo-European roots).]

squat′ter n.

squatter

(ˈskwɒtə)
n
1. (Law) a person who occupies property or land to which he or she has no legal title
2. (Law) (in Australia)
a. (formerly) a person who occupied a tract of land, esp pastoral land, as tenant of the Crown
b. a farmer of sheep or cattle on a large scale
3. (Law) (in New Zealand) a 19th-century settler who took up large acreage on a Crown lease

squat•ter

(ˈskwɒt ər)

n.
1. a person or thing that squats.
2. a person who occupies property without permission, lease, or payment of rent.
3. a person who settles on land under government regulation, in order to acquire title.
[1775–85]
squat′ter•dom, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.squatter - someone who settles lawfully on government land with the intent to acquire title to it
colonist, settler - a person who settles in a new colony or moves into new country
2.squatter - someone who settles on land without right or title
interloper, intruder, trespasser - someone who intrudes on the privacy or property of another without permission
Translations

squatter

[ˈskwɒtəʳ] Nocupa mf, okupa mf

squatter

[ˈskwɒtər] nsquatter m, squatteur/euse m/f

squatter

n (on land) → Squatter(in) m(f), → illegaler Siedler, illegale Siedlerin; (in house) → Hausbesetzer(in) m(f)

squatter

[ˈskwɒtəʳ] noccupante m/f abusivo/a
References in classic literature ?
Judge Temple, the landlord and owner of a township, with Nathaniel Bumppo a lawless squatter, and professed deer-killer, in order to preserve the game of the county
The warriors about him were all fine looking fellows, though shorter and squatter than the Sarians or the Amozites.
I put no manure whatever on this land, not being the owner, but merely a squatter, and not expecting to cultivate so much again, and I did not quite hoe it all once.
echoed the squatter, "I am as rightful an owner of the land I stand on, as any governor in the States
The summons of the unnurtured squatter brought an immediate accession to their party.
In short, if the brand owner doesn't notice the squatter's ITU application in the Official Gazette and object within 30 days, the squatter can effectively prevent the brand owner from using its own trademark for more than three years.
Dorine Neal, president of the 96-unit Circle Villa Condominium Association in Lauderhill, said there are at least several unit-owner squatters and a rental squatter in her complex, and that the numbers are growing.
Manila: The Commission on Human Rights urged city councils in Metro Manila to come up with a law against the "unjust" demolition of squatter settlements as informal settler groups demonstrated against the government eviction drive.
Reporter Robert Neuwirth spent two years living in squatter neighborhoods on four continents, so his exploration comes not just from an outsider's perspective, but from one who has lived amongst them.
As Neuwirth reports, squatter anarchy can work surprisingly well.
Di Tella, Galiani, and Schargrodsky study this hypothesis using a natural experiment from a squatter settlement in the outskirts of Buenos Aires, ensuring that the allocation of property rights is exogenous to the characteristics of the squatters.
Investigative reporter Rober Neuwirth personally spent two years living in squatter neighborhoods on four continents, and from that experience presents Shadow Cities: A Billion Squatters, A New Urban World an engrossing documentary concerning shantytowns and those who live within them--estimated to be a billion individuals, and projected to grow to two billion.