squire


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squire

 (skwīr)
n.
1. A man who attends or escorts a woman; a gallant.
2. An English country gentleman, especially the chief landowner in a district.
3. A magistrate or justice of the peace.
4. A local dignitary.
5. A young nobleman attendant upon a knight and ranked next below a knight in feudal hierarchy.
tr.v. squired, squir·ing, squires
To attend as a squire; escort.

[Middle English squier, from Old French esquier; see esquire.]

squire

(skwaɪə)
n
1. (Sociology) a country gentleman in England, esp the main landowner in a rural community
2. (Historical Terms) feudal history a young man of noble birth, who attended upon a knight
3. rare a man who courts or escorts a woman
4. informal chiefly Brit a term of address used by one man to another, esp, unless ironic, to a member of a higher social class
5. (Animals) Austral an immature snapper. See snapper2
vb
(tr) (of a man) to escort (a woman)
[C13: from Old French esquier; see esquire]

squire

(skwaɪər)

n., v. squired, squir•ing. n.
1. (in England) a country gentleman, esp. the chief landed proprietor in a district.
2. a young man of noble birth who, as an aspirant to knighthood, served a knight.
3. a personal attendant, as of a person of rank.
4. a man who accompanies or escorts a woman.
5. a title applied to a justice of the peace, local judge, or other local dignitary of a rural district or small town.
v.t.
6. to attend or escort as, or in the manner of, a squire.
[1250–1300; Middle English squier; aph. variant of esquire]
squire′less, adj.

squire


Past participle: squired
Gerund: squiring

Imperative
squire
squire
Present
I squire
you squire
he/she/it squires
we squire
you squire
they squire
Preterite
I squired
you squired
he/she/it squired
we squired
you squired
they squired
Present Continuous
I am squiring
you are squiring
he/she/it is squiring
we are squiring
you are squiring
they are squiring
Present Perfect
I have squired
you have squired
he/she/it has squired
we have squired
you have squired
they have squired
Past Continuous
I was squiring
you were squiring
he/she/it was squiring
we were squiring
you were squiring
they were squiring
Past Perfect
I had squired
you had squired
he/she/it had squired
we had squired
you had squired
they had squired
Future
I will squire
you will squire
he/she/it will squire
we will squire
you will squire
they will squire
Future Perfect
I will have squired
you will have squired
he/she/it will have squired
we will have squired
you will have squired
they will have squired
Future Continuous
I will be squiring
you will be squiring
he/she/it will be squiring
we will be squiring
you will be squiring
they will be squiring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been squiring
you have been squiring
he/she/it has been squiring
we have been squiring
you have been squiring
they have been squiring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been squiring
you will have been squiring
he/she/it will have been squiring
we will have been squiring
you will have been squiring
they will have been squiring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been squiring
you had been squiring
he/she/it had been squiring
we had been squiring
you had been squiring
they had been squiring
Conditional
I would squire
you would squire
he/she/it would squire
we would squire
you would squire
they would squire
Past Conditional
I would have squired
you would have squired
he/she/it would have squired
we would have squired
you would have squired
they would have squired
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.squire - young nobleman attendant on a knightsquire - young nobleman attendant on a knight
armiger, armor-bearer - a squire carrying the armor of a knight
attendant, attender, tender - someone who waits on or tends to or attends to the needs of another
2.squire - an English country landowner
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
landholder, landowner, property owner - a holder or proprietor of land
3.squire - a man who attends or escorts a woman
attendant, attender, tender - someone who waits on or tends to or attends to the needs of another
Verb1.squire - attend upon as a squire; serve as a squire
escort - accompany as an escort; "She asked her older brother to escort her to the ball"
Translations
aseenkantajakavaljeeriseuralainen

squire

[ˈskwaɪəʳ]
A. N (o.f.) (= landowner) → terrateniente m, hacendado m (LAm), estanciero m (LAm) (Hist) (= knight's attendant) → escudero m; (= lady's escort) → galán m, acompañante m
the squire (in relation to villagers etc) → el señor
the squire of Ambridgeel señor de Ambridge, el mayor terrateniente de Ambridge
yes, squire! (Brit) → ¡sí, jefe!
which way, squire?¿por dónde, caballero?
B. VT [+ lady] → acompañar

squire

[ˈskwaɪər] n (British) (= landowner) → propriétaire m terrien

squire

n
(esp Brit: = landowner) → Gutsherr m, → ˜ Junker m (Hist); right, squire (Brit inf) → jawohl, der Herr (dated), → in Ordnung, Chef (inf); the squire of the manorder Herr des Gutes
(Hist, = knight’s attendant) → Knappe m
(dated, = escort) → Kavalier m (dated)
vt (dated)begleiten, eskortieren (dated)

squire

[ˈskwaɪəʳ] n (old) (landowner) → possidente m
References in classic literature ?
About this time my brother, Squire Boon, with another adventurer, who came to explore the country shortly after us, was wandering through the forest, determined to find me, if possible, and accidentally found our camp.
Of course," she said coldly, "I won't detain you; your business must be urgent, and I forgot--at least I had forgotten until to- day--that you have other duties more important than that of squire of dames.
Curious to tell, this imperial negro, Ahasuerus Daggoo, was the Squire of little Flask, who looked like a chess-man beside him.
There was now riding off in all directions to the doctor's, to the farrier's, and no doubt to Squire Gordon's, to let him know about his son.
He went, in his boat, this time accompanied by a faithful squire, down the stream.
Ferndean then remained uninhabited and unfurnished, with the exception of some two or three rooms fitted up for the accommodation of the squire when he went there in the season to shoot.
All this Jem swore he had seen, more by token that it was the very day he had been mole-catching on Squire Cass's land, down by the old saw-pit.
The squire had them all broken up, but the pieces are there to this day.
Squire Jenkins and the Parson say they wouldn't come near your house again--no matter how sick they are.
He rode, not a mule, like his companion, but a strong hackney for the road, to save his gallant war-horse, which a squire led behind, fully accoutred for battle, with a chamfrom or plaited head-piece upon his bead, having a short spike projecting from the front.
No, she said, he had come home in the afternoon but had gone up to the hall to dine and pass the evening with the squire.
At this point they came in sight of thirty forty windmills that there are on plain, and as soon as Don Quixote saw them he said to his squire, "Fortune is arranging matters for us better than we could have shaped our desires ourselves, for look there, friend Sancho Panza, where thirty or more monstrous giants present themselves, all of whom I mean to engage in battle and slay, and with whose spoils we shall begin to make our fortunes; for this is righteous warfare, and it is God's good service to sweep so evil a breed from off the face of the earth.