squirrel


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

squir·rel

 (skwûr′əl, skwŭr′-)
n.
1. Any of various arboreal rodents of the tribe Sciurini and especially of the genus Sciurus, characteristically having a long flexible bushy tail. Also called tree squirrel.
2. Any of various other rodents of the family Sciuridae, such as the ground squirrels and the flying squirrels.
3. The fur of one of these rodents.
tr.v. squir·reled, squir·rel·ing, squir·rels or squir·relled or squir·rel·ling
To hide or store: squirreled away her money.

[Middle English squirel, from Anglo-Norman esquirel, from Vulgar Latin *scūriolus, diminutive of *scūrius, alteration of Latin sciūrus, from Greek skiouros : skiā, shadow + ourā, tail; see ors- in Indo-European roots.]

squirrel

(ˈskwɪrəl; US ˈskwɜːrəl; ˈskwʌr-)
n, pl -rels or -rel
1. (Animals) any arboreal sciurine rodent of the genus Sciurus, such as S. vulgaris (red squirrel) or S. carolinensis (grey squirrel), having a bushy tail and feeding on nuts, seeds, etc.
2. (Animals) any other rodent of the family Sciuridae, such as a ground squirrel or a marmot
3. (Textiles) the fur of such an animal
4. informal a person who hoards things
vb, -rels, -relling or -relled, -rels, -reling or -reled
informal (usually foll by: away) to store for future use; hoard
[C14: from Old French esquireul, from Late Latin sciūrus, from Greek skiouros, from skia shadow + oura tail]
ˈsquirrel-ˌlike adj

squir•rel

(ˈskwɜr əl, ˈskwʌr-; esp. Brit. ˈskwɪr əl)

n., pl. -rels, (esp. collectively) -rel, n.
1. any arboreal, bushy-tailed rodent of the family Sciuridae, esp. of the genus Sciurus.
2. any other member of the family Sciuridae, including ground squirrels, prairie dogs, and woodchucks.
3. the meat of such an animal.
4. the fur of such an animal.
v.t.
5. to store or hide (money, valuables, etc.) for the future, as squirrels store nuts and seeds for winter (often fol. by away).
[1325–75; Middle English squirel < Anglo-French escuirel (Old French escuireul) « Vulgar Latin *scūriolus, diminutive of *scūrius, for Latin sciūrus < Greek skíouros probably literally shadow-tailed]

squirrel


Past participle: squirrelled
Gerund: squirrelling

Imperative
squirrel
squirrel
Present
I squirrel
you squirrel
he/she/it squirrels
we squirrel
you squirrel
they squirrel
Preterite
I squirrelled
you squirrelled
he/she/it squirrelled
we squirrelled
you squirrelled
they squirrelled
Present Continuous
I am squirrelling
you are squirrelling
he/she/it is squirrelling
we are squirrelling
you are squirrelling
they are squirrelling
Present Perfect
I have squirrelled
you have squirrelled
he/she/it has squirrelled
we have squirrelled
you have squirrelled
they have squirrelled
Past Continuous
I was squirrelling
you were squirrelling
he/she/it was squirrelling
we were squirrelling
you were squirrelling
they were squirrelling
Past Perfect
I had squirrelled
you had squirrelled
he/she/it had squirrelled
we had squirrelled
you had squirrelled
they had squirrelled
Future
I will squirrel
you will squirrel
he/she/it will squirrel
we will squirrel
you will squirrel
they will squirrel
Future Perfect
I will have squirrelled
you will have squirrelled
he/she/it will have squirrelled
we will have squirrelled
you will have squirrelled
they will have squirrelled
Future Continuous
I will be squirrelling
you will be squirrelling
he/she/it will be squirrelling
we will be squirrelling
you will be squirrelling
they will be squirrelling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been squirrelling
you have been squirrelling
he/she/it has been squirrelling
we have been squirrelling
you have been squirrelling
they have been squirrelling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been squirrelling
you will have been squirrelling
he/she/it will have been squirrelling
we will have been squirrelling
you will have been squirrelling
they will have been squirrelling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been squirrelling
you had been squirrelling
he/she/it had been squirrelling
we had been squirrelling
you had been squirrelling
they had been squirrelling
Conditional
I would squirrel
you would squirrel
he/she/it would squirrel
we would squirrel
you would squirrel
they would squirrel
Past Conditional
I would have squirrelled
you would have squirrelled
he/she/it would have squirrelled
we would have squirrelled
you would have squirrelled
they would have squirrelled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.squirrel - a kind of arboreal rodent having a long bushy tailsquirrel - a kind of arboreal rodent having a long bushy tail
gnawer, rodent - relatively small placental mammals having a single pair of constantly growing incisor teeth specialized for gnawing
tree squirrel - any typical arboreal squirrel
family Sciuridae, Sciuridae - a mammal family of true squirrels including: ground squirrels; marmots; chipmunks; flying squirrels; spermophiles
spermophile, ground squirrel, gopher - any of various terrestrial burrowing rodents of Old and New Worlds; often destroy crops
eastern chipmunk, ground squirrel, hackee, striped squirrel, Tamias striatus - small striped semiterrestrial eastern American squirrel with cheek pouches
chipmunk - a burrowing ground squirrel of western America and Asia; has cheek pouches and a light and dark stripe running down the body
American flying squirrel - New World flying squirrels
Asiatic flying squirrel - nocturnal rodent of Asia having furry folds of skin between forelegs and hind legs enabling it to move by gliding leaps
2.squirrel - the fur of a squirrel
fur, pelt - the dressed hairy coat of a mammal

squirrel

verb
squirrel something away save, reserve, set aside, hoard, keep, hold, store, collect, gather, put aside, hide away, lay by, put by, salt away, treasure up, keep up your sleeve (informal), put aside for a rainy day Arlott squirrelled away books, pictures and porcelain plates.
noun
Related words
adjective sciurine
habitation drey or dray

squirrel

verb
To store up (supplies or money), usually well beyond one's needs.Also used with away:
Slang: stash.
Translations
سنجابسِنْجابسِنْجَاب
катерица
veverka
egern
sciuro
orav
orava
vjeverica
mókus
íkorni
リス
다람쥐
sciurus
voverė
vāvere
wiewiórkabuszowaćchomikować
veveriţă
vevericaveverička
veverica
ekorre
กระรอก
білка
con sóc

squirrel

[ˈskwɪrəl] N (squirrels or squirrel (pl)) → ardilla f
squirrel away VT + ADV [+ nuts etc] → almacenar

squirrel

[ˈskwɪrəl]
nécureuil m
squirrel away
vt sep (= store, hide) [+ money, objects] → mettre en lieu sûr

squirrel

nEichhörnchen nt
adj attrEichhörnchen-; squirrel furEichhörnchenpelz m

squirrel

[ˈskwɪrl] nscoiattolo
red squirrel → scoiattolo eurasiatico
grey squirrel → scoiattolo grigio

squirrel

(ˈskwirəl) , ((American) ˈskwə:rəl) noun
a type of animal of the rodent family, usually either reddish-brown or grey, with a large bushy tail.

squirrel

سِنْجَاب veverka egern Eichhörnchen σκίουρος ardilla orava écureuil vjeverica scoiattolo リス 다람쥐 eekhoorn ekorn wiewiórka esquilo белка ekorre กระรอก sincap con sóc 松鼠
References in classic literature ?
He stood so still that a squirrel, busy with it's harvesting, ran dawn a pine close beside him, saw him suddenly and skipped back, scolding so shrilly that Beth looked up, espied the wistful face behind the birches, and beckoned with a reassuring smile.
One day he killed a squirrel that sat on one of the lower branches of a tree and chattered at him.
But you bring La Folle one good fat squirrel fo' her dinner to-morrow, an' she goin' be satisfi'.
I am no scholar, and I care not who knows it; but, judging from what I have seen, at deer chases and squirrel hunts, of the sparks below, I should think a rifle in the hands of their grandfathers was not so dangerous as a hickory bow and a good flint-head might be, if drawn with Indian judgment, and sent by an Indian eye.
A squirrel, from the lofty depths of his domestic tree, chattered either in anger or merriment -- for the squirrel is such a choleric and humorous little personage, that it is hard to distinguish between his moods -- so he chattered at the child, and flung down a nut upon her bead.
Streaming files of wild ducks began to make their appearance high in the air; the bark of the squirrel might be heard from the groves of beech and hickory- nuts, and the pensive whistle of the quail at intervals from the neighboring stubble field.
He might as well have provided them for a squirrel or a magpie.
I know not how significant it is, or how far it is an evidence of singularity, that an individual should thus consent in his pettiest walk with the general movement of the race; but I know that something akin to the migratory instinct in birds and quadrupeds--which, in some instances, is known to have affected the squirrel tribe, impelling them to a general and mysterious movement, in which they were seen, say some, crossing the broadest rivers, each on its particular chip, with its tail raised for a sail, and bridging narrower streams with their dead--that something like the furor which affects the domestic cattle in the spring, and which is referred to a worm in their tails,--affects both nations and individuals, either perennially or from time to time.
Some heads were bowed upon folded arms, some lay back with open mouths that issued unconscious music; the flies buzzed and bit, unmolested, the rats swarmed softly out from a hundred holes, and pattered about, and made themselves at home everywhere; and one of them sat up like a squirrel on the king's head and held a bit of cheese in its hands and nibbled it, and dribbled the crumbs in the king's face with naive and impudent irreverence.
A catbird, the Northern mocker, lit in a tree over Tom's head, and trilled out her imitations of her neighbors in a rapture of enjoyment; then a shrill jay swept down, a flash of blue flame, and stopped on a twig almost within the boy's reach, cocked his head to one side and eyed the strangers with a consuming curiosity; a gray squirrel and a big fellow of the "fox" kind came skurrying along, sitting up at intervals to inspect and chatter at the boys, for the wild things had probably never seen a human being before and scarcely knew whether to be afraid or not.
Miss Sawyer had bought her niece a nice gray squirrel muff and tippet, which was even more unbecoming if possible, than Rebecca's other articles of wearing apparel; but aunt Jane had made her the loveliest dress of green cashmere, a soft, soft green like that of a young leaf.
And on the trunk of the tree he leaned against, a brown squirrel was clinging and watching him, and from behind a bush nearby a cock pheasant was delicately stretching his neck to peep out, and quite near him were two rabbits sitting up and sniffing with tremulous noses--and actually it appeared as if they were all drawing near to watch him and listen to the strange low little call his pipe seemed to make.