stability


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Related to stability: Aircraft stability

sta·bil·i·ty

 (stə-bĭl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. sta·bil·i·ties
1. The state or quality of being stable, especially:
a. Resistance to change, deterioration, or displacement.
b. Constancy of character or purpose; steadfastness.
c. Reliability; dependability.
2. The ability of an object, such as a ship or aircraft, to maintain equilibrium or resume its original, upright position after displacement, as by the sea or strong winds.
3. Roman Catholic Church A vow committing a Benedictine monk to one monastery for life.

stability

(stəˈbɪlɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the quality of being stable
2. (Aeronautics) the ability of an aircraft to resume its original flight path after inadvertent displacement
3. (Physical Geography) meteorol
a. the condition of an air or water mass characterized by no upward movement
b. the degree of susceptibility of an air mass to disturbance by convection currents
4. (Biology) ecology the ability of an ecosystem to resist change
5. (Electrical Engineering) electrical engineering the ability of an electrical circuit to cope with changes in the operational conditions
6. (Roman Catholic Church) a vow taken by every Benedictine monk attaching him perpetually to the monastery where he is professed

sta•bil•i•ty

(stəˈbɪl ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the state or quality of being stable.
2. firmness in position.
3. continuance without change; permanence.
4. resistance to chemical change or disintegration.
5. resistance to change, esp. sudden change or deterioration.
6. constancy, as of character or purpose; steadiness: emotional stability.
7. the ability of an aircraft to return to its original flying position when abruptly displaced.
8. a vow, taken by a Benedictine, to stay in one monastery.
[1400–50; < Old French < Latin stabilitās <stabilis stable2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stability - the quality or attribute of being firm and steadfast
steadiness, firmness - the quality of being steady or securely and immovably fixed in place
unstableness, instability - the quality or attribute of being unstable and irresolute
2.stability - a stable order (especially of society)
order - established customary state (especially of society); "order ruled in the streets"; "law and order"
instability - an unstable order
3.stability - the quality of being enduring and free from change or variation; "early mariners relied on the constancy of the trade winds"
unchangeability, unchangeableness, unchangingness, changelessness - the quality of being unchangeable; having a marked tendency to remain unchanged
invariance - the nature of a quantity or property or function that remains unchanged when a given transformation is applied to it; "the invariance of the configuration under translation"
metastability - the quality of a physical system that persists in its existing equilibrium when undisturbed (or only slightly disturbed) but able to pass to a more stable equilibrium when sufficiently disturbed
monotony - constancy of tone or pitch or inflection

stability

stability

noun
1. The condition of being free from defects or flaws:
2. Reliability in withstanding pressure, force, or stress:
Translations
اِسْتِقْرارثَبات، رُسوخ، إسْتِقْرار
pevnostrovnováhastabilita
stabilitet
tasapainoisuus
stabilnost
stöîugleiki
安定
안정성
stabilita
stabilnost
stabilitet
ความมั่นคง
dengesağlamlık
sự ổn định

stability

[stəˈbɪlɪtɪ] Nestabilidad f

stability

[stəˈbɪləti] n
(economic, political, social)stabilité f
(emotional, mental)équilibre m
[ladder, structure] → stabilité f
(CHEMISTRY)stabilité f

stability

nStabilität f; (of relationship also, of job)Beständigkeit f; (mental) stability(seelische) Ausgeglichenheit

stability

[stəˈbɪlɪtɪ] n (structural, political, economic) → stabilità; (mental, emotional) → equilibrio; (of family, relationship) → solidità

stable1

(ˈsteibl) adjective
(negative unstable).
1. firm and steady or well-balanced. This chair isn't very stable.
2. firmly established and likely to last. a stable government.
3. (of a person or his character) unlikely to become unreasonably upset or hysterical. She's the only stable person in the whole family.
4. (of a substance) not easily decomposed.
stability (stəˈbi-) noun
the quality of being stable.
ˈstabilize, ˈstabilise (-bi-) verb
to make (more) stable. He put a wedge of paper under the table to stabilize it.
ˌstabiliˈzation, ˌstabiliˈsation noun

stability

اِسْتِقْرار stabilita stabilitet Stabilität σταθερότητα estabilidad tasapainoisuus stabilité stabilnost stabilità 安定 안정성 stabiliteit stabilitet stabilność estabilidade стабильность stabilitet ความมั่นคง denge sự ổn định 稳定性

sta·bil·i·ty

n. estabilidad, permanencia, seguridad.

stability

n estabilidad f
References in classic literature ?
Jo thought intently for a minute with her eyes fixed on the picture, then she smoothed out her wrinkled forehead and said, with a decided nod at the face opposite, "No thank you, sir, you're very charming, but you've no more stability than a weathercock.
To the superstitious mind of Devil's Ford and its few remaining locators, this new partnership seemed to promise that unity of interest and stability of fortune that Devil's Ford had lacked.
It was an age when what we call talent had far less consideration than now, but the massive materials which produce stability and dignity of character a great deal more.
Harriet, here comes a very sudden trial of our stability in good thoughts.
The connection among the Swiss cantons scarcely amounts to a confederacy; though it is sometimes cited as an instance of the stability of such institutions.
Among the difficulties encountered by the convention, a very important one must have lain in combining the requisite stability and energy in government, with the inviolable attention due to liberty and to the republican form.
Unwilling as she was to admit an idea so destructive of Jane's happiness, and so dishonorable to the stability of her lover, she could not prevent its frequently occurring.
There is no shadow of stability in the policy of an English Government, and the most sacred oaths of England would, even if engrossed on vellum, find very few buyers among colonies and dependencies that have suffered from vain beliefs.
Astor was not overconfident of the stability and firm faith of these mercurial beings.
Blunt, with one of his grins that made me doubt the stability of his feelings and the consistency of his outlook in regard to his whole tale.
Solomon hath pronounced, that in counsel is stability.
The village had formerly contained, side by side with the argicultural labourers, an interesting and better-informed class, ranking distinctly above the former--the class to which Tess's father and mother had belonged--and including the carpenter, the smith, the shoemaker, the huckster, together with nondescript workers other than farm-labourers; a set of people who owed a certain stability of aim and conduct to the fact of their being lifeholders like Tess's father, or copyholders, or occasionally, small freeholders.