stabilizer

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Related to Stabilizers: Automatic stabilizers

sta·bi·liz·er

 (stā′bə-lī′zər)
n.
1. One that makes or keeps something stable: "The New Deal equipped the economy with built-in stabilizers" (Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.).
2. A device, such as a gyroscopically controlled fin, that prevents excessive rolling of a ship in heavy seas.
3. An airfoil that stabilizes an aircraft or missile in flight.
4. Chemistry A substance that renders or maintains a solution, mixture, suspension, or state resistant to chemical change.

stabilizer

(ˈsteɪbɪˌlaɪzə) or

stabiliser

n
1. (Aeronautics) any device for stabilizing an aircraft. See also horizontal stabilizer, vertical stabilizer
2. (Chemistry) a substance added to something to maintain it in a stable or unchanging state, such as an additive to food to preserve its texture during distribution and storage
3. (Nautical Terms) nautical
a. a system of one or more pairs of fins projecting from the hull of a ship and controllable to counteract roll
4. (Automotive Engineering) either of a pair of brackets supporting a small wheel that can be fitted to the back wheel of a bicycle to help an inexperienced cyclist to maintain balance
5. (Electrical Engineering) an electronic device for producing a direct current supply of constant voltage
6. (Economics) economics a measure, such as progressive taxation, interest-rate control, or unemployment benefit, used to restrict swings in prices, employment, production, etc, in a free economy
7. a person or thing that stabilizes

sta•bi•liz•er

(ˈsteɪ bəˌlaɪ zər)

n.
1. one that stabilizes.
2. a device for keeping an aircraft in stable equilibrium, as a horizontal tail surface.
3.
a. a device designed to counteract the roll of a vessel at sea.
b. a gyrostabilizer.
4. any of various substances added to foods, etc., to prevent deterioration, the breaking down of an emulsion, or the loss of desirable properties.
[1860–65]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stabilizer - a chemical that is added to a solution or mixture or suspension to maintain it in a stable or unchanging state
chemical, chemical substance - material produced by or used in a reaction involving changes in atoms or molecules
2.stabilizer - airfoil consisting of a device for stabilizing an aircraft
aerofoil, airfoil, control surface, surface - a device that provides reactive force when in motion relative to the surrounding air; can lift or control a plane in flight
horizontal tail - the horizontal stabilizer and elevator in the tail assembly of an aircraft
empennage, tail assembly, tail - the rear part of an aircraft
tail fin, tailfin, vertical fin, vertical stabiliser, vertical stabilizer - a stabilizer that is part of the vertical tail structure of an airplane
3.stabilizer - a device for making something stable
device - an instrumentality invented for a particular purpose; "the device is small enough to wear on your wrist"; "a device intended to conserve water"
fin - a stabilizer on a ship that resembles the fin of a fish
gyrostabiliser, gyrostabilizer - a stabilizer consisting of a heavy gyroscope that spins on a vertical axis; reduces side-to-side rolling of a ship or plane
outrigger - a stabilizer for a canoe; spars attach to a shaped log or float parallel to the hull
anti-sway bar, stabilizer bar - a rigid metal bar between the front suspensions and between the rear suspensions of cars and trucks; serves to stabilize the chassis
Translations
stabiliseur

stabilizer

[ˈsteɪbəlaɪzəʳ] N
1. (usu pl) (Naut) (also on bike) → estabilizador m
2. (Culin) → estabilizante m

stabilizer

[ˈsteɪbɪlaɪzər] stabiliser (British) nstabilisateur m

stabilizer

n (Naut, Chem) → Stabilisator m; (Aviat) → Stabilisierungsfläche f; (US Aviat) → Höhenflosse f; (on bicycle) → Stützrad nt

stabilizer

[ˈsteɪbəˌlaɪzəʳ] n (Aer, Naut) → stabilizzatore m

sta·bi·liz·er

n. estabilizador, agente que estabiliza.

stabilizer

n estabilizador m; mood — estabilizador del ánimo
References in classic literature ?
I've been too busy on that new airship stabilizer dad gave me an idea for.
I have been so busy on my stabilizer patent that I haven't kept up with current literature.
com/research/w5wp68/world_uv_light) has announced the addition of the "World UV Light Stabilizers Market - Opportunities and Forecasts, 2014-2020" report to their offering.
The company s CEO John Venables stated, These new stabilizers are a modern refinement of electric-powered stabilizers Naiad first developed for naval applications in 2008.
More of these so-called condensate stabilizers are being constructed in Texas, where output and coastal export capability is snowballing.
Therefore, stabilizers are indispensable for many products made from plastics and rubber: They ensure safe processing and prevent premature aging and weathering.
General-purpose bottle stabilizers with improved cost/performance are in development.
Stabilizers are ultimately about balance, but today's "active" stabilizers also absorb excess vibration and shot noise for better bowhunting.
The contents include a review of the existing literature; photophysics; potentially useful stabilization methods; information on available UV stabilizers; the stability of UV stabilizers themselves; principles of stabilizer selection; information on degradation and stabilization of different polymers and rubbers; the final products that use the majority of UV stabilizers; specific qualities of UV stabilizers that may affect formulation because of interaction with other formulation components; the analytical methods most frequently used in UV stabilization; and the effects of UV stabilizers on the health and safety of workers involved in their processing and of the members of the public using the products.
UV absorbers and light stabilizers featured in the literature include HALS, benzophenone, benzotriazole, oxanilide, triazine, nickel quencher, hydroxyphenyl-triazine, polymeric hindered amine, broad band and hindered benzoate types.
In making the cable, they add compounds with plasticizers and stabilizers.
Introduced to target competition many decades ago by Archery Hall of Fame member Earl Hoyt, and later adapted by crafty bow hunters looking for more stable shooting form, today's stabilizers are great examples of evolving technology, incorporating new materials and engineering know-how.