staccato


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Related to staccato: staccato speech

stac·ca·to

 (stə-kä′tō)
adj.
1. Music Cut short crisply; detached: staccato octaves.
2. Marked by or composed of abrupt, disconnected parts or sounds: staccato applause.
n. pl. stac·ca·tos or stac·ca·ti (-tē)
A staccato manner or sound.

[Italian, past participle of staccare, to detach, short for distaccare, from obsolete French destacher, from Old French destachier; see detach.]

stac·ca′to adv.

staccato

(stəˈkɑːtəʊ)
adj
1. (Classical Music) music (of notes) short, clipped, and separate
2. characterized by short abrupt sounds, as in speech: a staccato command.
adv
(Classical Music) (esp used as a musical direction) in a staccato manner
[C18: from Italian, from staccare to detach, shortened from distaccare]

stac•ca•to

(stəˈkɑ toʊ)

adj., adv., n., pl. -tos, -ti (-tē). adj.
1.
a. shortened and detached when played or sung: staccato notes.
b. characterized by performance in which the notes are abruptly disconnected: a staccato style of playing. Compare legato.
2. composed of or characterized by abruptly disconnected elements; disjointed: rapid-fire, staccato speech.
adv.
3. in a staccato manner.
n.
4. something done or performed in a staccato manner.
[1715–25; < Italian: disconnected, past participle of staccare to detach]

staccato

sharp and separated, not flowing
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.staccato - (music) marked by or composed of disconnected parts or sounds; cut short crisply; "staccato applause"; "a staccato command"; "staccato notes"
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
legato, smooth - (music) without breaks between notes; smooth and connected; "a legato passage"
Adv.1.staccato - separating the notes; in music; "play this staccato, please"
legato - connecting the notes; in music; "play this legato, please"
Translations

staccato

[stəˈkɑːtəʊ]
A. ADVstaccato
B. ADJstaccato

staccato

[stəˈkɑːtəʊ]
advstaccato
adj
(MUSIC)piqué(e)
[noise, voice] → saccadé(e)

staccato

adj, adv (Mus) → staccato, stakkato; (fig)abgehackt

staccato

[stəˈkɑːtəʊ] (Mus)
1. advin staccato
2. adjstaccato/a; (sound) → scandito/a
References in classic literature ?
While still in the anteroom Prince Andrew heard loud voices and a ringing staccato laugh- a laugh such as one hears on the stage.
She was a little frightened, not only by his thoughts, but by his staccato way of expressing them.
What he said we could not hear for the deep-drawn blast and the high staccato crackle of the blazing hold.
As he stood thus, peering out into the darkness of the cloud-enshrouded night, there came to him from across the water, like a slap in the face, so sudden and unexpected was it, the sharp staccato of an exchange of shots and then the scream of a woman.
A series of staccato taps on the west window brought Anne flying in from the yard, eyes shining, cheeks faintly flushed with pink, unbraided hair streaming behind her in a torrent of brightness.
As if too hot for her lips, she filled her saucer with the greasy-looking, nondescript fluid, and continued her set glare, her breast rising and falling with staccato, mechanical movement.
the lady was saying in a sighing staccato as Archer came in.
As they arose the girl's revolver spoke in sharp staccato and one sank back to the deck again to rise no more.
Instantly the soundless waste was torn with the quick staccato of guns upon every hand.
A little staccato cry of pain; a cry which seemed to spring into life from a tortured heart, broke from her lips.
Electric lights, a shed-covered wharf, mountains of luggage and freight, the noisy toil of 'longshoremen and sailors, the staccato snorts of donkey engines and the whining sheaves as running lines ran through the blocks, a crowd of white-coated stewards carrying hand-baggage, the quartermaster at the gangway foot, the gangway sloping steeply up to the Umatilla's promenade deck, more quartermasters and gold-laced ship's officers at the head of the gangway, and more crowd and confusion blocking the narrow deck-- thus Michael knew, beyond all peradventure, that he had come back to the sea and its ships, where he had first met Steward, where he had been always with Steward, save for the recent nightmare period in the great city.
Through the closed doors came the sounds of the discreet staccato accompaniment of the orchestra, and a single female voice rendering distinctly a musical phrase.