staccato


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Related to staccato: staccato speech

stac·ca·to

 (stə-kä′tō)
adj.
1. Music Cut short crisply; detached: staccato octaves.
2. Marked by or composed of abrupt, disconnected parts or sounds: staccato applause.
n. pl. stac·ca·tos or stac·ca·ti (-tē)
A staccato manner or sound.

[Italian, past participle of staccare, to detach, short for distaccare, from obsolete French destacher, from Old French destachier; see detach.]

stac·ca′to adv.

staccato

(stəˈkɑːtəʊ)
adj
1. (Classical Music) music (of notes) short, clipped, and separate
2. characterized by short abrupt sounds, as in speech: a staccato command.
adv
(Classical Music) (esp used as a musical direction) in a staccato manner
[C18: from Italian, from staccare to detach, shortened from distaccare]

stac•ca•to

(stəˈkɑ toʊ)

adj., adv., n., pl. -tos, -ti (-tē). adj.
1.
a. shortened and detached when played or sung: staccato notes.
b. characterized by performance in which the notes are abruptly disconnected: a staccato style of playing. Compare legato.
2. composed of or characterized by abruptly disconnected elements; disjointed: rapid-fire, staccato speech.
adv.
3. in a staccato manner.
n.
4. something done or performed in a staccato manner.
[1715–25; < Italian: disconnected, past participle of staccare to detach]

staccato

sharp and separated, not flowing
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.staccato - (music) marked by or composed of disconnected parts or sounds; cut short crisply; "staccato applause"; "a staccato command"; "staccato notes"
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
legato, smooth - (music) without breaks between notes; smooth and connected; "a legato passage"
Adv.1.staccato - separating the notes; in music; "play this staccato, please"
legato - connecting the notes; in music; "play this legato, please"
Translations

staccato

[stəˈkɑːtəʊ]
A. ADVstaccato
B. ADJstaccato

staccato

[stəˈkɑːtəʊ]
advstaccato
adj
(MUSIC)piqué(e)
[noise, voice] → saccadé(e)

staccato

adj, adv (Mus) → staccato, stakkato; (fig)abgehackt

staccato

[stəˈkɑːtəʊ] (Mus)
1. advin staccato
2. adjstaccato/a; (sound) → scandito/a
References in classic literature ?
Suddenly the painter appeared at the door of the studio and made staccato signs for them to come in.
The tumultuous noise resolved itself now into the disorderly mingling of many voices, the gride of many wheels, the creaking of waggons, and the staccato of hoofs.
There is quite a concert of noises; the great bull-dog, chained against the stables, is thrown into furious exasperation by the unwary approach of a cock too near the mouth of his kennel, and sends forth a thundering bark, which is answered by two fox- hounds shut up in the opposite cow-house; the old top-knotted hens, scratching with their chicks among the straw, set up a sympathetic croaking as the discomfited cock joins them; a sow with her brood, all very muddy as to the legs, and curled as to the tail, throws in some deep staccato notes; our friends the calves are bleating from the home croft; and, under all, a fine ear discerns the continuous hum of human voices.
She was a little frightened, not only by his thoughts, but by his staccato way of expressing them.
He spoke in a slow staccato fashion, choosing his words with care, and gave the impression generally of a man of learning and letters who had had ill-usage at the hands of fortune.
Sometimes they beat quickly, sometimes slowly, sometimes in obvious question and answer, one far to the east breaking out in a high staccato rattle, and being followed after a pause by a deep roll from the north.
We don't want to jump to any conclusions about anybody," Brain was saying in his staccato style.
the lady was saying in a sighing staccato as Archer came in.
As they arose the girl's revolver spoke in sharp staccato and one sank back to the deck again to rise no more.
Already the stables were lit up like a chandelier; there was a staccato rattle of horseshoes in the stable yard, and the great gates were opening as we skimmed past in the nick of time.
What he said we could not hear for the deep-drawn blast and the high staccato crackle of the blazing hold.
A staccato of shots came over to him, reminding him of army manoeuvres, of newspaper descriptions of fights, of all that was entirely correct in his conception of warfare.