stacking


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stack

 (stăk)
n.
1. An orderly pile, especially one arranged in layers: a stack of newspapers. See Synonyms at heap.
2. A large, usually conical pile of straw or fodder arranged for outdoor storage.
3. Computers A section of memory and its associated registers used for temporary storage of information in which the item most recently stored is the first to be retrieved.
4. A group of three rifles supporting each other, butt downward and forming a cone.
5.
a. A chimney or flue.
b. A group of chimneys arranged together.
6. A vertical exhaust pipe, as on a ship or locomotive.
7. stacks
a. An extensive arrangement of bookshelves.
b. The area of a library in which most of the books are shelved.
8. A stackup.
9. An English measure of coal or cut wood, equal to 108 cubic feet (3.06 cubic meters).
10. Informal A large quantity: a stack of work to do.
v. stacked, stack·ing, stacks
v.tr.
1. To arrange in a stack; pile.
2. To load or cover with stacks or piles: stacked the dishwasher.
3.
a. Games To prearrange the order of (a deck of cards) so as to increase the chance of winning.
b. To prearrange or fix unfairly so as to favor a particular outcome: tried to stack the jury.
4. To direct (aircraft) to circle at different altitudes while waiting to land.
v.intr.
To form a stack: Make sure the boxes stack neatly against the wall.
Phrasal Verb:
stack up Informal
1. To measure up or equal: Their gift doesn't stack up against his.
2. To make sense; add up: Her report just doesn't stack up.

[Middle English stak, pile, heap, haystack, from Old Norse stakkr.]

stack′a·ble adj.
stack′er n.

stacking

(ˈstækɪŋ)
n
(Aeronautics) the arrangement of aircraft traffic in busy flight lanes, esp while waiting to land at an airport, with a minimum vertical separation for safety of 1000 feet below 29 000 feet and 2000 feet above 29 000 feet
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Pollyanna, smiling bravely now, flew about, hanging the dresses in the closet, stacking the books on the table, and putting away the undergarments in the bureau drawers.
When the ice-men were at work here in '46-7, the cakes sent to the shore were one day rejected by those who were stacking them up there, not being thick enough to lie side by side with the rest; and the cutters thus discovered that the ice over a small space was two or three inches thinner than elsewhere, which made them think that there was an inlet there.
Thanks to kids all over the world, Sport Stacking, an individual and team sport in which participants race the clock to stack and unstack twelve specially-designed cups is taking off in a big way.
Because Toyo also processes high tack compounds, the automatic stacking option with foil separation was also included.
Cup stacking is the new game in town and phys ed teachers are gearing up so students can play.
High-volume injection molders don't need to tie up their workers with stacking and packing the continuous cascade of parts flowing out of their molds.
Dense-Pac achieves this space-saving, high-density cost-efficient memory by stacking two 128Mb, or 256Mb DDR SDRAM chips in 2 bank configurations for 256 and 512Mb stacks.
The flex assembly is folded, thereby stacking the devices into a single, small footprint module.
This, in turn, has increased the demand for accurate (and dense) strip stacking.
They can consist either of self-contained mini-dies or of stacking mandrels surrounded by separate body pieces; the modules can be fed directly from the side or from the bottom as in a conventional die.
NASDAQ:JAKK) announced today that its Speed Stacks[R] StackPack[R], the official equipment for the new competitive game of sport stacking, was recognized as one of the Holiday 2006 Hot Dozen - the top twelve new products predicted to be bestsellers by Toy Wishes magazine, the Ultimate Guide to Family Entertainment.
This modular precision strip stacker system employs a single strip stacking station for each individual strip.