stage


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to stage: Stage lighting

stage

 (stāj)
n.
1. A raised and level floor or platform.
2.
a. A raised platform on which theatrical performances are presented.
b. An area in which actors perform.
c. The acting profession, or the world of theater. Used with the: The stage is her life.
3. The scene of an event or of a series of events.
4. A platform on a microscope that supports a slide for viewing.
5. A scaffold for workers.
6. A resting place on a journey, especially one providing overnight accommodations.
7. The distance between stopping places on a journey; a leg: proceeded in easy stages.
8. A stagecoach.
9. A level or story of a building.
10. The height of the surface of a river or other fluctuating body of water above a set point: at flood stage.
11.
a. A level, degree, or period of time in the course of a process: the toddler stage of child development; the early stages of a disease.
b. A point in the course of an action or series of events: too early to predict a winner at this stage.
12. One of two or more successive propulsion units of a rocket vehicle that fires after the preceding one has been jettisoned.
13. Geology A subdivision in the classification of stratified rocks, ranking just below a series and representing rock formed during a chronological age.
14. Electronics An element or a group of elements in a complex arrangement of parts, especially a single tube or transistor and its accessory components in an amplifier.
v. staged, stag·ing, stag·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To exhibit or present to an audience: stage a boxing match.
b. To prepare (a house) for sale by altering its appearance.
2. To produce or direct (a theatrical performance).
3. To arrange and carry out: stage an invasion.
4. Medicine To determine the extent or progression of (a cancer, for example).
v.intr.
1. To be adaptable to or suitable for theatrical presentation: a play that stages well.
2. To stop at a designated place in the course of a journey: "tourists from London who had staged through Warsaw" (Frederick Forsyth).

[Middle English, from Old French estage, from Vulgar Latin *staticum, from Latin status, past participle of stāre, to stand; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

stage′ful′ n.

stage

(steɪdʒ)
n
1. a distinct step or period of development, growth, or progress: a child at the toddling stage.
2. a raised area or platform
3. (Theatre) the platform in a theatre where actors perform
4. (Theatre) the stage the theatre as a profession
5. any scene regarded as a setting for an event or action
6. a portion of a journey or a stopping place after such a portion
7. (Automotive Engineering) short for stagecoach
8. (Automotive Engineering) Brit a division of a bus route for which there is a fixed fare
9. (Astronautics) one of the separate propulsion units of a rocket that can be jettisoned when it has burnt out. See also multistage1
10. (Biology) any of the various distinct periods of growth or development in the life of an organism, esp an insect: a larval stage; pupal stage.
11. (Biology) the organism itself at such a period of growth
12. (Geological Science) a small stratigraphical unit; a subdivision of a rock series or system
13. (General Physics) the platform on a microscope on which the specimen is mounted for examination
14. (Electronics) electronics a part of a complex circuit, esp one of a number of transistors with the associated elements required to amplify a signal in an amplifier
15. (Education) a university subject studied for one academic year: Stage II French.
16. by easy stages in easy stages not hurriedly: he learned French by easy stages.
vb
17. (Theatre) (tr) to perform (a play), esp on a stage: we are going to stage 'Hamlet'.
18. (Theatre) (tr) to set the action of (a play) in a particular time or place
19. (tr) to plan, organize, and carry out (an event)
20. (Automotive Engineering) (intr) obsolete to travel by stagecoach
[C13: from Old French estage position, from Vulgar Latin staticum (unattested), from Latin stāre to stand]

stage

(steɪdʒ)

n., v. staged, stag•ing. n.
1. a phase, degree, or step in a process, development, or series.
2. a raised platform or floor, as for speakers or performers.
3.
a. the platform on which the actors perform in a theater.
b. this platform with all the parts of the theater and all the apparatus back of the proscenium.
4. the stage, the theater, esp. acting, as a profession.
6. the scene of any action.
7. a stagecoach.
8. a place of rest on a journey, esp. a regular stopping place of a stagecoach.
9. the distance between two places of rest on a journey.
10. a portion or period of a course of action or of life: the pupal stage of an insect.
11. a division of stratified rocks corresponding to a single geologic age.
12. the small platform of a microscope on which the object to be examined is placed.
13. an element or functional unit of an electronic system, as a circuit containing a section of one of the tubes or transistors of an amplifier.
14. a section of a rocket containing one or more engines, usu. designed to separate after burnout.
v.t.
15. to represent, produce, or exhibit on or as if on a stage: to stage a play.
16. to furnish with a stage, staging, stage set, etc.
17. to set (a play) in a specified locale or time.
18. to plan, organize, or carry out, esp. for public or dramatic effect: Workers staged a one-day strike.
19. to classify the natural progression of (a disease, esp. cancer).
[1250–1300; Middle English (n.) < Old French estage < Vulgar Latin *staticum standing place =stat(us), past participle of stāre to stand + -icum, neuter of -icus -ic]
stage′a•ble, adj.

stage

1. An element of the missile or propulsion system that generally separates from the missile at burnout or cut-off. Stages are numbered chronologically in order of burning.
2. To process, in a specified area, troops which are in transit from one locality to another. See also marshalling; staging area. 3.

stage


Past participle: staged
Gerund: staging

Imperative
stage
stage
Present
I stage
you stage
he/she/it stages
we stage
you stage
they stage
Preterite
I staged
you staged
he/she/it staged
we staged
you staged
they staged
Present Continuous
I am staging
you are staging
he/she/it is staging
we are staging
you are staging
they are staging
Present Perfect
I have staged
you have staged
he/she/it has staged
we have staged
you have staged
they have staged
Past Continuous
I was staging
you were staging
he/she/it was staging
we were staging
you were staging
they were staging
Past Perfect
I had staged
you had staged
he/she/it had staged
we had staged
you had staged
they had staged
Future
I will stage
you will stage
he/she/it will stage
we will stage
you will stage
they will stage
Future Perfect
I will have staged
you will have staged
he/she/it will have staged
we will have staged
you will have staged
they will have staged
Future Continuous
I will be staging
you will be staging
he/she/it will be staging
we will be staging
you will be staging
they will be staging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been staging
you have been staging
he/she/it has been staging
we have been staging
you have been staging
they have been staging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been staging
you will have been staging
he/she/it will have been staging
we will have been staging
you will have been staging
they will have been staging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been staging
you had been staging
he/she/it had been staging
we had been staging
you had been staging
they had been staging
Conditional
I would stage
you would stage
he/she/it would stage
we would stage
you would stage
they would stage
Past Conditional
I would have staged
you would have staged
he/she/it would have staged
we would have staged
you would have staged
they would have staged

stage

The rocks formed during a geological age.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stage - any distinct time period in a sequence of eventsstage - any distinct time period in a sequence of events; "we are in a transitional stage in which many former ideas must be revised or rejected"
diakinesis - the final stage of the prophase of meiosis
diplotene - the fourth stage of the prophase of meiosis
leptotene - the first stage of the prophase of meiosis
pachytene - the third stage of the prophase of meiosis
phase of cell division - a stage in meiosis or mitosis
zygotene - the second stage of the prophase of meiosis
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
anal phase, anal stage - (psychoanalysis) the second sexual and social stage of a child's development during which bowel control is learned
genital phase, genital stage - (psychoanalysis) the fifth sexual and social stage in a person's development occurring during adolescence; interest focuses on sexual activity
latency period, latency phase, latency stage - (psychoanalysis) the fourth period (from about age 5 or 6 until puberty) during which sexual interests are supposed to be sublimated into other activities
oral phase, oral stage - (psychoanalysis) the first sexual and social stage of an infant's development; the mouth is the focus of the libido and satisfaction comes from suckling and chewing and biting
phallic phase, phallic stage - (psychoanalysis) the third stage in a child's development when awareness of and manipulation of the genitals is supposed to be a primary source of pleasure
chapter - any distinct period in history or in a person's life; "the industrial revolution opened a new chapter in British history"; "the divorce was an ugly chapter in their relationship"
incubation - (pathology) the phase in the development of an infection between the time a pathogen enters the body and the time the first symptoms appear
fertile period, fertile phase - the time in the menstrual cycle when fertilization is most likely to be possible (7 days before to 7 days after ovulation)
menstrual phase - the phase of the menstrual cycle during which the lining of the uterus is shed (the first day of menstrual flow is considered day 1 of the menstrual cycle)
musth - an annual phase of heightened sexual excitement in the males of certain large mammals (especially elephants); is associated with discharge from a gland between the eye and ear; "the frenzied elephant was in musth"
luteal phase, secretory phase - the second half of the menstrual cycle after ovulation; the corpus luteum secretes progesterone which prepares the endometrium for the implantation of an embryo; if fertilization does not occur then menstrual flow begins
generation - a stage of technological development or innovation; "the third generation of computers"
apogee, culmination - a final climactic stage; "their achievements stand as a culmination of centuries of development"
seedtime - any time of new development
safe period - that time during a woman's menstrual cycle during which conception is least likely to occur (usually immediately before of after menstruation)
2.stage - a specific identifiable position in a continuum or series or especially in a process; "a remarkable degree of frankness"; "at what stage are the social sciences?"
state - the way something is with respect to its main attributes; "the current state of knowledge"; "his state of health"; "in a weak financial state"
ladder - ascending stages by which somebody or something can progress; "he climbed the career ladder"
acme, meridian, summit, tiptop, superlative, elevation, height, pinnacle, peak, top - the highest level or degree attainable; the highest stage of development; "his landscapes were deemed the acme of beauty"; "the artist's gifts are at their acme"; "at the height of her career"; "the peak of perfection"; "summer was at its peak"; "...catapulted Einstein to the pinnacle of fame"; "the summit of his ambition"; "so many highest superlatives achieved by man"; "at the top of his profession"
extent - the point or degree to which something extends; "the extent of the damage"; "the full extent of the law"; "to a certain extent she was right"
resultant, end point - the final point in a process
standard of life, standard of living - a level of material comfort in terms of goods and services available to someone or some group; "they enjoyed the highest standard of living in the country"; "the lower the standard of living the easier it is to introduce an autocratic production system"
plane - a level of existence or development; "he lived on a worldly plane"
state of the art - the highest degree of development of an art or technique at a particular time; "the state of the art in space travel"
ultimacy, ultimateness - the state or degree of being ultimate; the final or most extreme in degree or size or time or distance, "the ultimacy of these social values"
quickening - the stage of pregnancy at which the mother first feels the movements of the fetus
climax - the most severe stage of a disease
3.stage - a large platform on which people can stand and can be seen by an audience; "he clambered up onto the stage and got the actors to help him into the box"
downstage - the front half of the stage (as seen from the audience)
mise en scene, stage setting, setting - arrangement of scenery and properties to represent the place where a play or movie is enacted
platform - a raised horizontal surface; "the speaker mounted the platform"
forestage, proscenium, apron - the part of a modern theater stage between the curtain and the orchestra (i.e., in front of the curtain)
theater, theatre, house - a building where theatrical performances or motion-picture shows can be presented; "the house was full"
theater stage, theatre stage - a stage in a theater on which actors can perform
upstage - the rear part of the stage
backstage, offstage, wing - a stage area out of sight of the audience
right stage, stage right - the part of the stage on the actor's right as the actor faces the audience
left stage, stage left - the part of the stage on the actor's left as the actor faces the audience
4.stage - the theater as a profession (usually `the stage'); "an early movie simply showed a long kiss by two actors of the contemporary stage"
dramatic art, dramaturgy, theater, theatre, dramatics - the art of writing and producing plays
5.stage - a large coach-and-four formerly used to carry passengers and mail on regular routes between towns; "we went out of town together by stage about ten or twelve miles"
coach-and-four, four-in-hand, coach - a carriage pulled by four horses with one driver
6.stage - a section or portion of a journey or course; "then we embarked on the second stage of our Caribbean cruise"
travel, traveling, travelling - the act of going from one place to another; "he enjoyed selling but he hated the travel"
journey, journeying - the act of traveling from one place to another
fare-stage - a section along the route of a bus for which the fare is the same
7.stage - any scene regarded as a setting for exhibiting or doing something; "All the world's a stage"--Shakespeare; "it set the stage for peaceful negotiations"
scene - the place where some action occurs; "the police returned to the scene of the crime"
8.stage - a small platform on a microscope where the specimen is mounted for examinationstage - a small platform on a microscope where the specimen is mounted for examination
platform - a raised horizontal surface; "the speaker mounted the platform"
Verb1.stage - perform (a play), especially on a stage; "we are going to stage `Othello'"
performing arts - arts or skills that require public performance
re-create - create anew; "Re-create the boom of the West on a small scale"
localise, localize, set, place - locate; "The film is set in Africa"
2.stage - plan, organize, and carry out (an event); "the neighboring tribe staged an invasion"
initiate, pioneer - take the lead or initiative in; participate in the development of; "This South African surgeon pioneered heart transplants"
dogfight - arrange for an illegal dogfight
tee up - make detailed arrangements or preparations
phase - arrange in phases or stages; "phase a withdrawal"

stage

noun
1. step, leg, phase, point, level, period, division, length, lap, juncture the final stage of the tour
2. platform, stand, podium, rostrum, dais, soapbox I went on stage and did my show.
3. scene, area, field, theatre, sector, territory, province, arena, scope, sphere, realm, domain He was finally forced off the political stage last year.
verb
1. present, produce, perform, put on, do, give, play She staged her first play in the late 1970s.
2. organize, mount, arrange, lay on, orchestrate, engineer At the middle of this year the government staged a huge military parade.
the stage the theatre, show business, the boards, the footlights, the dramatic arts Madge did not want to put her daughter on the stage.

stage

noun
1. A raised platform on which theatrical performances are given:
board (used in plural), proscenium.
2. The art and occupation of an actor:
3. A temporary framework with a floor, used by workmen:
4. The place where an action or event occurs:
5. One of the units in a course, as on an ascending or descending scale:
Informal: notch.
6. An interval regarded as a distinct evolutionary or developmental unit:
verb
1. To produce on the stage:
2. To organize and carry out (an activity):
Translations
جُزء من رِحْلَهمَرْحَلَةمَرْحَلَةٌ من مَراحِل الصّاروخمَرْحَلَه، فَتْرَهمِنَصَّه، خَشَبَة المَسْرَح
fázejevištěstádiumstupeňuspořádat
scenetrinzonefaseforanstalte
صحنه
vaiheesittäänäyttämö
dio
szakaszszínpad
áfangiòrepsetja á sviî, sviîsetjaskipuleggjastig
段階
무대
inscenētorganizētperiodsposmsskatuve
javiskojazdaštádium
oderstopnja
platformscen
เวทีการแสดง
sahnesahnelemeksahneye koymakyapmakaşama
giai đoạn

stage

[ˈsteɪdʒ]
n
(in theatre)scène f
(= profession) the stage → le théâtre
(= phase) → étape f, stade m
to go through a difficult stage → traverser une période difficile
at a later stage → plus tard
at this stage (= at this point) → à ce stade
at this stage in the negotiations → à ce stade des négociations (= at the moment) → pour l'instant
At this stage, it's too early to comment → Pour l'instant, il est trop tôt pour se prononcer.
in the early stages → au début
in the final stages → à la fin
to do sth in stages → faire qch par étapes
(= platform) → estrade f
(= arena) → scène f
the international stage → la scène internationale
modif [actor, play, show] → de théâtre; [career] → dans le théâtre; [appearance, role] → au théâtre
vt
[+ play] → monter, mettre en scène
[+ demonstration] → organiser; [+ ceremony, event] → organiser; [+ exhibition] → organiser, monter; [+ strike, protest] → organiser
to stage a remarkable recovery → faire un retour spectaculaire

stage

n
(Theat, fig) → Bühne f; the stage (= profession)das Theater, die Bühne; to be on/go on/leave the stage (as career) → beim Theater sein/zum Theater gehen/das Theater verlassen; to go on stage (actor) → die Bühne betreten; (play) → anfangen; to come off stage, to leave the stagevon der Bühne abtreten; to put a play on the stageein Stück aufführen or auf die Bühne bringen; to write for the stageTheater- or Bühnenstücke schreiben; to adapt a novel for the stageeinen Roman fürs Theater bearbeiten; to hold or dominate the stage (lit, fig)die Szene beherrschen; the stage was set (lit)das Bühnenbild war aufgebaut; (fig)alles war vorbereitet; to set the stage for something (fig)den Weg für etw bereiten; the stage was set for a confrontationdie Situation war reif für eine Auseinandersetzung
(= platform in hall)Podium nt
(= period)Stadium nt; (of process, operation, development)Phase f; at this stage such a thing is impossiblezum gegenwärtigen Zeitpunkt ist das unmöglich; at this stage in the negotiationsan diesem Punkt der Verhandlungen; at this stage in the game (fig)zu diesem Zeitpunkt; in the early/final stage(s)im Anfangs-/Endstadium; at an early stage in its historyganz zu Anfang seiner Geschichte; what stage is your thesis at?wie weit sind Sie mit Ihrer Dissertation?; I’m at the talking stage with the clubich befinde mich mit dem Klub gerade in Gesprächen; we have reached a stage where …wir sind an einem Punkt angelangt, wo …; to go through a difficult stageeine schwierige Phase durchmachen; to be at the experimental stageim Versuchsstadium sein
(= part of journey, race etc)Abschnitt m, → Etappe f; (= fare stage)Teilstrecke f, → Fahrzone f; (= actual bus stop)Zahlgrenze f; in or by (easy) stages (lit)etappenweise; (fig also)Schritt für Schritt
(= section of rocket)Stufe f; a three-stage rocketeine dreistufige Rakete
(old inf, = stagecoach) → Postkutsche f
vt playaufführen, auf die Bühne bringen; competition, eventdurchführen; accident, scene, coupinszenieren; welcomearrangieren; demonstration, strike, protest etcveranstalten; to stage a recoverysich erholen; to stage a comebacksein Come-back or Comeback machen; the play is staged in the 19th centurydas Stück spielt im 19. Jahrhundert; stageed readingBühnenlesung f, → dramatische Lesung

stage

:
stage box
nBühnen- or Proszeniumsloge f
stage career
nBühnen- or Theaterkarriere f
stagecoach
nPostkutsche f
stagecraft
ndramaturgisches Können; (of actor)schauspielerisches Können
stage design
nBühnenbild f
stage designer
nBühnenbildner(in) m(f)
stage direction
nBühnen- or Regieanweisung f
stage director
nRegisseur(in) m(f)
stage-dive
vi (rock musician etc)von der Bühne ins Publikum springen
stage door
nBühneneingang m
stage effect
stage fright
nLampenfieber nt; to have an attack of stageLampenfieber haben
stage hand
nBühnenarbeiter(in) m(f)
stage-manage
vt (lit)Inspizient sein bei; (fig) demonstration, argumentinszenieren
stage manager
nInspizient(in) m(f)
stage name
stage play
nBühnenstück nt

stage

:
stage race
n (Cycling) → Etappenrennen nt
stage rights
plAufführungs- or Bühnenrechte pl
stage set
nBühnenbild nt
stage setting
nBühnenbild nt
stage-struck
adjtheaterbesessen; to be stageunbedingt zum Theater wollen
stage whisper
nBühnenflüstern nt; to say something in a stageetw hörbar flüstern
stage win
n (Cycling) → Etappensieg f

stage

[steɪdʒ]
1. n
a. (period, section, of process, development) → fase f, stadio; (of journey) → tappa; (of rocket) → stadio
in stages (travel, work) → a tappe
in or by easy stages → a piccole tappe
in the early/final stages → negli stadi iniziali/finali
at this stage in the negotiations → in questa fase dei negoziati
to go through a difficult stage → attraversare un periodo difficile
b. (platform) → palco; (in theatre) → palcoscenico
the stage (profession) → il teatro
to go on the stage → entrare in scena (become an actor) → fare del teatro
2. vt (play) → mettere in scena, rappresentare; (arrange, welcome, demonstration) → organizzare; (fake, accident) → simulare
to stage a scene → allestire una scena (fig) → fare una sceneggiata
to stage a quick recovery → riprendersi subito
to stage a comeback → fare ritorno

stage1

(steidʒ) noun
a raised platform especially for performing or acting on, eg in a theatre.
verb
1. to prepare and produce (a play etc) in a theatre etc. This play was first staged in 1928.
2. to organize (an event etc). The protesters are planning to stage a demonstration.
ˈstaging noun
1. wooden planks etc forming a platform.
2. the way in which a play etc is presented on a stage. The staging was good, but the acting poor.
stage direction
an order to an actor playing a part to do this or that. a stage direction to enter from the left.
stage fright
the nervousness felt by an actor etc when in front of an audience, especially for the first time. The young actress was suffering from stage fright and could not utter a word.
ˈstagehand noun
a workman employed to help with scenery etc.
stage manager
a person who is in charge of scenery and equipment for plays etc.
ˈstagestruck adjective
fascinated with the theatre or having a great desire to become an actor/actress.

stage2

(steidʒ) noun
1. a period or step in the development of something. The plan is in its early stages; At this stage, we don't know how many survivors there are.
2. part of a journey. The first stage of our journey will be the flight to Singapore.
3. a section of a bus route.
4. a section of a rocket.
ˈstagecoach noun
a closed vehicle pulled by horses that travelled in former times along a regular route and carried passengers and mail.

stage

مَرْحَلَة fáze scene Phase σκηνή escenario, etapa vaihe stade dio palcoscenico 段階 무대 fase scene etap palco стадия scen เวทีการแสดง sahne giai đoạn 阶段

stage

n. [sickness] estadío, etapa o período de transición durante el desarrollo de una enfermedad; fase;
in a recuperating ___en una fase de recuperación.

stage

n (disease, etc.) estadio, etapa; (cancer) estadio; (sleep) etapa; (puberty) estadio
References in classic literature ?
It was this feeling that had turned her mind to the stage.
cried Ned Newton gaily, as he got into one of the several tree canoes provided for the transportation of the party up the Chamelecon river, for the first stage of their journey into the wilds of Honduras.
We went all the way in day-coaches, becoming more sticky and grimy with each stage of the journey.
Pontellier sitting idle, exchanging occasional words, glances or smiles which indicated a certain advanced stage of intimacy and camaraderie.
In this stage of the obsequies, a warrior much renowned for deed in arms, and more especially for services in the recent combat, a man of stern and grave demeanor, advanced slowly from the crowd, and placed himself nigh the person of the dead.
There was no water in the bared and burning bars of the river to reflect the vertical sun, but under its direct rays one or two tinned roofs and corrugated zinc cabins struck fire, a few canvas tents became dazzling to the eye, and the white wooded corral of the stage office and hotel insupportable.
The unlikeliest materials -- a stick, a bunch of rags, a flower -- were the puppets of Pearl's witchcraft, and, without undergoing any outward change, became spiritually adapted to whatever drama occupied the stage of her inner world.
Though I cannot tell why it was exactly that those stage managers, the Fates, put me down for this shabby part of a whaling voyage, when others were set down for magnificent parts in high tragedies, and short and easy parts in genteel comedies, and jolly parts in farces --though I cannot tell why this was exactly; yet, now that I recall all the circumstances, I think I can see a little into the springs and motives which being cunningly presented to me under various disguises, induced me to set about performing the part I did, besides cajoling me into the delusion that it was a choice resulting from my own unbiased freewill and discriminating judgment.
In good time, nevertheless, as the ardor of youth declines; as years and dumps increase; as reflection lends her solemn pauses; in short, as a general lassitude overtakes the sated Turk; then a love of ease and virtue supplants the love for maidens; our Ottoman enters upon the impotent, repentant, admonitory stage of life, forswears, disbands the harem, and grown to an exemplary, sulky old soul, goes about all alone among the meridians and parallels saying his prayers, and warning each young Leviathan from his amorous errors.
The dancers are dull and heavy--most of them have been drinking hard, and have long ago passed the stage of exhilaration.
Well, I'm mighty glad to hear ye all and see ye all once more, 'cause I don't know when I'll be gone to glory; but I've done got ready, chil'en; 'pears like I'd got my little bundle all tied up, and my bonnet on, jest a waitin' for the stage to come along and take me home; sometimes, in the night, I think I hear the wheels a rattlin', and I'm lookin' out all the time; now, you jest be ready too, for I tell ye all, chil'en," she said striking her staff hard on the floor, "dat ar glory is a mighty thing
While Sir Dinadan was waiting for his turn to enter the lists, he came in there and sat down and began to talk; for he was always making up to me, because I was a stranger and he liked to have a fresh market for his jokes, the most of them having reached that stage of wear where the teller has to do the laughing himself while the other person looks sick.