stage direction


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stage direction

n
(Theatre) an instruction to an actor or director, written into the script of a play
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stage direction - an instruction written as part of the script of a playstage direction - an instruction written as part of the script of a play
instruction, direction - a message describing how something is to be done; "he gave directions faster than she could follow them"
drama, dramatic play, play - a dramatic work intended for performance by actors on a stage; "he wrote several plays but only one was produced on Broadway"
Translations
إرشاد مَسْرَحي، إخْراج
scénická poznámka
regibemærkning
színpadi utasítás
fyrirmæli um sviîsetningu
scénická poznámka
sahne açıklaması

stage direction

n (in text) → didascalie fpl

stage1

(steidʒ) noun
a raised platform especially for performing or acting on, eg in a theatre.
verb
1. to prepare and produce (a play etc) in a theatre etc. This play was first staged in 1928.
2. to organize (an event etc). The protesters are planning to stage a demonstration.
ˈstaging noun
1. wooden planks etc forming a platform.
2. the way in which a play etc is presented on a stage. The staging was good, but the acting poor.
stage direction
an order to an actor playing a part to do this or that. a stage direction to enter from the left.
stage fright
the nervousness felt by an actor etc when in front of an audience, especially for the first time. The young actress was suffering from stage fright and could not utter a word.
ˈstagehand noun
a workman employed to help with scenery etc.
stage manager
a person who is in charge of scenery and equipment for plays etc.
ˈstagestruck adjective
fascinated with the theatre or having a great desire to become an actor/actress.
References in classic literature ?
Here Herod rages on the pageant and in the street also" is one stage direction.
Skidder's door as he was red-inking a stage direction for Myrtle Delorme (Miss Leeson) in his (unaccepted) comedy, to "pirouette across stage from L to the side of the Count.
And this,' said the lady, crossing to Smike, as tragic actresses cross when they obey a stage direction, 'and this is the other.
For example, the website footnote for the stage direction in act 3, scene 4 when Malvolio enters cross-gartered in yellow stockings duplicates with slightly different wording the footnote in the printed edition yet adds 3 lengthy sentences regarding staging this scene not found in the printed edition.
If one had to pick a "perfect show," it would have to be Le nozze di Figaro, with its lovely sets by Paul Brown and sensible stage direction by Bruce Donnell.
A stage direction says: "Herod with Asdrubal, and some of the Guards, comes from within the Scene on the Theatre, at the same time Sohemus, by another of the Theatre Doors, enters on it" (24).
My second example is generated by an atypical stage direction from another familiar script, 1 Henry IV, that sets up the re-robbing of Falstaff and his cronies at Gadshill: "As they are sharing the Prince and Poins set upon them, they all run away, and Falstaff after a blow or two runs away too, leaving the booty behind them" (2.
Isser explains that the Folio's stage direction Exeunt omnes before the epilogue is, to use Dessert's term, permissive.
It also appears to me that in some cases (those most frequently used stage directions) the optional use of ke in a stage direction possibly makes no difference to the performance style.
Discussing the omission of an Elizabethan stage direction in a prominent edition he claims that "Since many readers concentrate upon the text rather than the notes, such an editorial decision (especially in this prestigious series) can have a greater impact upon future interpreters than an equivalent choice by an actor or a critic.
Until the distance learning venture, Zupan hadn't imagined that stage direction would be part of his job description.
But the media ridiculed its Academy Award nomination for best screenplay based on material from another medium; they failed to catch the significance of the stage direction or added visual hypertext.