stagger


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stag·ger

 (stăg′ər)
v. stag·gered, stag·ger·ing, stag·gers
v.intr.
To move or stand unsteadily, as if under a great weight; totter. See Synonyms at blunder.
v.tr.
1. To cause to totter, sway, or reel: The blow staggered him.
2. To astonish, shock, or overwhelm: a teacher staggered by a former student's accomplishments; a company staggered by increases in energy costs.
3. To place on or as if on alternating sides of a center line; set in a zigzag row or rows: theater seats that were staggered for clear viewing.
4. To arrange in alternating or overlapping time periods: staggered the nurses' shifts.
5. To arrange (the wings of a biplane) so that the leading edge of one wing is either ahead of or behind the leading edge of the other wing.
6. Sports To arrange (the start of a race) with the starting point in the outside lanes progressively closer to the finish line so as to neutralize the advantage of competing in the shorter inside lanes.
n.
1. A tottering, swaying, or reeling motion.
2. A staggered pattern, arrangement, or order.
3. staggers (used with a sing. verb) Any of various diseases in animals, especially horses, cattle, or other domestic animals, that are characterized by a lack of coordination in moving, a staggering gait, and frequent falling.

[Alteration of Middle English stakeren, from Old Norse stakra, frequentative of staka, to push.]

stag′ger·er n.
stag′ger·y adj.

stagger

(ˈstæɡə)
vb
1. (usually intr) to walk or cause to walk unsteadily as if about to fall
2. (tr) to astound or overwhelm, as with shock: I am staggered by his ruthlessness.
3. (tr) to place or arrange in alternating or overlapping positions or time periods to prevent confusion or congestion: a staggered junction; to stagger holidays.
4. (intr) to falter or hesitate: his courage staggered in the face of the battle.
5. (Aeronautics) (tr) to set (the wings of a biplane) so that the leading edge of one extends beyond that of the other
n
6. the act or an instance of staggering
7. (Aeronautics) a staggered arrangement on a biplane, etc
[C13 dialect stacker, from Old Norse staka to push]
ˈstaggerer n

stag•ger

(ˈstæg ər)

v.i.
1. to walk, move, or stand unsteadily.
2. to falter or begin to give way, as in an argument.
3. to waver or hesitate, as in purpose or resolve.
v.t.
4. to cause to reel, totter, or become unsteady.
5. to astonish or shock: a fact that staggers the mind.
6. to cause to waver or falter.
7. to arrange in an alternating pattern: to stagger lunch hours.
n.
8. the act of staggering; a reeling or tottering movement.
9. a staggered order or arrangement.
10. staggers, (used with a sing. v.) any of several severe diseases of livestock characterized by a staggering gait.
[1520–30; earlier stacker to reel, Middle English stakeren < Old Norse stakra to reel =stak(a) to stagger + -ra frequentative suffix]
stag′ger•er, n.

stagger


Past participle: staggered
Gerund: staggering

Imperative
stagger
stagger
Present
I stagger
you stagger
he/she/it staggers
we stagger
you stagger
they stagger
Preterite
I staggered
you staggered
he/she/it staggered
we staggered
you staggered
they staggered
Present Continuous
I am staggering
you are staggering
he/she/it is staggering
we are staggering
you are staggering
they are staggering
Present Perfect
I have staggered
you have staggered
he/she/it has staggered
we have staggered
you have staggered
they have staggered
Past Continuous
I was staggering
you were staggering
he/she/it was staggering
we were staggering
you were staggering
they were staggering
Past Perfect
I had staggered
you had staggered
he/she/it had staggered
we had staggered
you had staggered
they had staggered
Future
I will stagger
you will stagger
he/she/it will stagger
we will stagger
you will stagger
they will stagger
Future Perfect
I will have staggered
you will have staggered
he/she/it will have staggered
we will have staggered
you will have staggered
they will have staggered
Future Continuous
I will be staggering
you will be staggering
he/she/it will be staggering
we will be staggering
you will be staggering
they will be staggering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been staggering
you have been staggering
he/she/it has been staggering
we have been staggering
you have been staggering
they have been staggering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been staggering
you will have been staggering
he/she/it will have been staggering
we will have been staggering
you will have been staggering
they will have been staggering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been staggering
you had been staggering
he/she/it had been staggering
we had been staggering
you had been staggering
they had been staggering
Conditional
I would stagger
you would stagger
he/she/it would stagger
we would stagger
you would stagger
they would stagger
Past Conditional
I would have staggered
you would have staggered
he/she/it would have staggered
we would have staggered
you would have staggered
they would have staggered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stagger - an unsteady uneven gaitstagger - an unsteady uneven gait    
gait - a person's manner of walking
Verb1.stagger - walk as if unable to control one's movements; "The drunken man staggered into the room"
walk - use one's feet to advance; advance by steps; "Walk, don't run!"; "We walked instead of driving"; "She walks with a slight limp"; "The patient cannot walk yet"; "Walk over to the cabinet"
2.stagger - walk with great difficulty; "He staggered along in the heavy snow"
walk - use one's feet to advance; advance by steps; "Walk, don't run!"; "We walked instead of driving"; "She walks with a slight limp"; "The patient cannot walk yet"; "Walk over to the cabinet"
3.stagger - to arrange in a systematic order; "stagger the chairs in the lecture hall"
arrange, set up - put into a proper or systematic order; "arrange the books on the shelves in chronological order"
4.stagger - astound or overwhelm, as with shock; "She was staggered with bills after she tried to rebuild her house following the earthquake"
overwhelm, sweep over, whelm, overpower, overtake, overcome - overcome, as with emotions or perceptual stimuli

stagger

verb
1. totter, reel, sway, falter, lurch, wobble, waver, teeter He was staggering and had to lean on the bar.
2. lurch, reel, stumble, sway, totter a government that staggered from crisis to crisis
3. astound, amaze, stun, surprise, shock, shake, overwhelm, astonish, confound, take (someone) aback, bowl over (informal), stupefy, strike (someone) dumb, throw off balance, give (someone) a shock, dumbfound, nonplus, flabbergast, take (someone's) breath away The whole thing staggers me.

stagger

verb
1. To walk unsteadily:
2. To proceed or perform in an unsteady, faltering manner:
3. To be irresolute in acting or doing:
4. To overwhelm with surprise, wonder, or bewilderment:
Translations
يَتَرَنَّح، يَتَمايَليَتَهَادَىيُصْعَق، يُذْهَليُنَظِّم نَوْبات العَمَل
ohromitpotácet serozložitvrávorat
forbløffeforskydeslingrevakle
kävellä horjuen
teturati
lépcsõzetessé tesz
skjögraslá út af laginuvíxlraîa; hagræîa
よろめく
비틀거리다
šlitiniuotisudaryti slankųjį grafiką
pārsteigtregulētsatriektstreipuļotveidot slīdošo grafiku
tackať sazdrviť
opotekati se
raggla
เดินเซ
düzenlemekşaşırmaksendelemeksendeleyerek yürümekyalpalamak
đi loạng choạng

stagger

[ˈstægəʳ]
A. N
1.tambaleo m
2. staggers (Vet) → modorra f
B. VItambalear
he staggered to the doorfue tambaleándose hasta la puerta
he was staggering aboutiba tambaleándose
C. VT
1. (= amaze) → dejar anonadado, dejar pasmado
we were staggered by the number of letters we receivednos dejó anonadados or pasmados la cantidad de cartas que recibimos
2. [+ hours, holidays, payments, spokes] → escalonar

stagger

[ˈstægər]
vi (gen)chanceler; (when drunk)tituber
I staggered to the nearest chair
BUT Je m'avançai d'un pas chancelant jusqu'à la chaise la plus proche.
vt
(= astound) [+ person] → stupéfier
[+ hours, holidays] → étaler, échelonner; [+ payments] → échelonner

stagger

vischwanken, taumeln; (because of illness, weakness) → wanken; (drunkenly) → torkeln; he was staggering along the streeter taumelte die Straße entlang
vt
(fig: = amaze: news etc) → den Atem verschlagen (+dat), → umhauen (inf); he was staggered to hear of his promotiondie Nachricht von seiner Beförderung verschlug ihm die Sprache or haute ihn um (inf); you stagger me!da bin ich aber platt! (inf)
hours, holidaysstaffeln, stufen; seats, spokesversetzt anordnen, versetzen
n
Taumeln nt; to give a staggertaumeln, schwanken; with a staggertaumelnd, schwankend
staggers sing or pl (Vet) → (Dumm)koller m

stagger

[ˈstægəʳ]
1. vt
a. (amaze, person) → sbalordire
b. (holidays, payments, hours) → scaglionare; (objects) → disporre a intervalli
2. vibarcollare
to stagger along/in/out → avanzare/entrare/uscire barcollando
he staggered to the door → andò verso la porta barcollando

stagger

(ˈstӕgə) verb
1. to sway, move or walk unsteadily. The drunk man staggered along the road.
2. to astonish. I was staggered to hear he had died.
3. to arrange (people's hours of work, holidays etc) so that they do not begin and end at the same times.
ˈstaggering adjective
causing unsteadiness, shock or astonishment. a staggering blow on the side of the head; That piece of news is staggering.

stagger

يَتَهَادَى potácet se vakle taumeln τρικλίζω tambalearse kävellä horjuen tituber teturati barcollare よろめく 비틀거리다 wankelen vingle zatoczyć się cambalear идти шатаясь raggla เดินเซ sendelemek đi loạng choạng 蹒跚

stag·ger

v. escalonar, saltear, distribuir con una secuencia; vacilar; tambalear; tambalearse.

stagger

vi tambalear(se)
References in classic literature ?
Clasp your hands so, and stagger across the room, crying frantically, `Roderigo Save me
The young men stagger under their burdens," returned Magua.
There are chaotic, blind, or drunken moments, in the lives of persons who lack real force of character,--moments of test, in which courage would most assert itself,--but where these individuals, if left to themselves, stagger aimlessly along, or follow implicitly whatever guidance may befall them, even if it be a child's.
So that not the fierce-fanged tiger in his heraldic coat can so stagger courage as the white-shrouded bear or shark.
The gig shaft ran right into the chest, making him stagger back with a cry that I shall never forget.
Jurgis could take up a two-hundred-and-fifty-pound quarter of beef and carry it into a car without a stagger, or even a thought; and now he stood in a far corner, frightened as a hunted animal, and obliged to moisten his lips with his tongue each time before he could answer the congratulations of his friends.
So he went to marching up and down, thinking, and frowning horrible every now and then; then he would hoist up his eyebrows; next he would squeeze his hand on his forehead and stagger back and kind of moan; next he would sigh, and next he'd let on to drop a tear.
To show himself independent of me, he would start and stagger through with his hymn in the most discordant manner.
And when old Fezziwig and Mrs Fezziwig had gone all through the dance; advance and retire, both hands to your partner, bow and curtsey, corkscrew, thread-the-needle, and back again to your place; Fezziwig cut -- cut so deftly, that he appeared to wink with his legs, and came upon his feet again without a stagger.
He did not actually stagger under the negus; but I should think his placid little pulse must have made two or three more beats in a minute, than it had done since the great night of my aunt's disappointment, when she struck at him with her bonnet.
Presently she slipped from his knee and began to toddle about, but with a pretty stagger that made Silas jump up and follow her lest she should fall against anything that would hurt her.
Though both were hardened and inflexible villains, the sight of the captive maiden, as well as her excelling beauty, at first appeared to stagger them; but an expressive glance from the Preceptor of Templestowe restored them to their dogged composure; and they delivered, with a precision which would have seemed suspicious to more impartial judges, circumstances either altogether fictitious or trivial, and natural in themselves, but rendered pregnant with suspicion by the exaggerated manner in which they were told, and the sinister commentary which the witnesses added to the facts.