staid


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Related to staid: stayed

staid

 (stād)
adj.
1. Characterized by sedateness and often a strait-laced sense of propriety; serious and conventional.
2. Fixed; permanent: "There is nothing settled, nothing staid in this universe" (Virginia Woolf).

[From obsolete staid, past participle of stay.]

staid′ly adv.
staid′ness n.

staid

(steɪd)
adj
1. of a settled, sedate, and steady character
2. rare permanent
[C16: obsolete past participle of stay1]
ˈstaidly adv
ˈstaidness n

staid

(steɪd)

adj.
1. of decorous, sedate, or solemn character.
2. fixed, settled, or permanent.
v.
3. Archaic. a pt. and pp. of stay 1.
staid′ly, adv.
staid′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.staid - characterized by dignity and propriety
decorous - characterized by propriety and dignity and good taste in manners and conduct; "the tete-a-tete was decorous in the extreme"

staid

staid

adjective
Full of or marked by dignity and seriousness:
Translations
رَزين، رَصين، وَقور
usedlý
sat
settlegur; alvarlegur
izturētsnosvērtsvecmodīgs

staid

[steɪd] ADJ [person] → serio; [clothes] → sobrio, serio

staid

[ˈsteɪd] adj (= dull) [person] → terne; [place] → banal(e); [image] → terne

staid

adj (+er)seriös, gesetzt; communityrespektabel; place, productseriös; colourgedeckt

staid

[steɪd] adj (-er (comp) (-est (superl))) → compassato/a

staid

(steid) adjective
(over-)serious or old-fashioned. A person of staid appearance/habits.
References in classic literature ?
A staid, steadfast man, whose life for the most part was a telling pantomime of action, and not a tame chapter of sounds.
If he had been able to buy all of the newspapers of the United States the next morning, he might have discovered that his beer-hunting exploit was being perused by some two score millions of people, and had served as a text for editorials in half the staid and solemn businessmen's newspapers in the land.
The huge green fragment of ice on which she alighted pitched and creaked as her weight came on it, but she staid there not a moment.
The staid, sober, thinking and industrious ones of our number would employ themselves in making corn-brooms, mats, horse-collars, and baskets; and another class of us would spend the time in hunting opossums, hares, and coons.
The two Abbots and I ran into the front room and peeped through the blind when we heard he was going by, and Miss Nash came and scolded us away, and staid to look through herself; however, she called me back presently, and let me look too, which was very goodnatured.
He entered the room with a look of self-consequence, slightly bowed to the ladies, without speaking a word, and, after briefly surveying them and their apartments, took up a newspaper from the table, and continued to read it as long as he staid.
Her appearance always acted as a damper to the curiosity raised by her oral oddities: hard-featured and staid, she had no point to which interest could attach.
It was a cool spot, staid but cheerful, a wonderful place for echoes, and a very harbour from the raging streets.
She had a little basket-trifle hanging at her side, with keys in it; and she looked as staid and as discreet a housekeeper as the old house could have.
We came to Richmond all too soon, and our destination there, was a house by the Green; a staid old house, where hoops and powder and patches, embroidered coats rolled stockings ruffles and swords, had had their court days many a time.
He ceas'd; and SATAN staid not to reply, But glad that now his Sea should find a shore, With fresh alacritie and force renew'd Springs upward like a Pyramid of fire Into the wilde expanse, and through the shock Of fighting Elements, on all sides round Environ'd wins his way; harder beset And more endanger'd, then when ARGO pass'd Through BOSPORUS betwixt the justling Rocks: Or when ULYSSES on the Larbord shunnd CHARYBDIS, and by th' other whirlpool steard.
that had Richard of the Lion's Heart been wise enough to have taken a fool's advice, he might have staid at home with his merry Englishmen, and left the recovery of Jerusalem to those same Knights who had most to do with the loss of it.