stained glass


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stained glass

 (stānd)
n.
1. Glass colored by mixing pigments inherently in the glass, by fusing colored metallic oxides onto the glass, or by painting and baking transparent colors on the glass surface.
2. Decorative glass consisting of multiple, colored pieces laid out to form an image or design and fastened together, usually with strips of lead, used especially for windows.

stained glass

n
(Ceramics)
a. glass that has been coloured in any of various ways, as by fusing with a film of metallic oxide or burning pigment into the surface, used esp for church windows
b. (as modifier): a stained-glass window.

stained′ glass′


n.
glass that has been colored, esp. by having pigments baked onto its surface or by having various metallic oxides fused into it.
[1785–95]
stained′-glass′, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stained glass - glass that has been colored in some way; used for church windows
glass - a brittle transparent solid with irregular atomic structure
Tiffany glass - a kind of opalescent colored glass that was used in the early 1900s for stained-glass windows and lamps
Translations
barevné sklo
glasmosaik
lasimaalaus
oslikani prozori
üvegfestésüvegfestmény
ステンドグラス
스테인드 글라스
målat glas
กระจกสี
kính màu

stained glass

[ˌsteɪndˈglɑːs] Nvidrio m de color

stained glass

[ˌsteɪndˈglɑːs] nvetro colorato

stained glass

زُجَاجٌ مُعَشَّق barevné sklo glasmosaik Buntglas βιτρό vidrio de colores lasimaalaus vitrail oslikani prozori vetro colorato ステンドグラス 스테인드 글라스 gebrandschilderd glas farget glass szkło witrażowe vitral витражное стекло målat glas กระจกสี vitray kính màu 彩色玻璃
References in classic literature ?
To be sure, it was a beautiful little cottage with a thatched roof and little spires at the gable-ends, and pieces of stained glass in some of the windows, almost as large as pocket-books.
said Penfentenyou, looking through the stained glass window down the garden.
These windows were of stained glass whose colour varied in accordance with the prevailing hue of the decorations of the chamber into which it opened.
Granted facility of travel, peace, good trade, and so on, there was besides a kind of dissatisfaction among the English with the older countries and the enormous accumulations of carved stone, stained glass, and rich brown painting which they offered to the tourist.
The corridor towards the south end gradually widened, terminating in a splendid high window with stained glass, a broad seat, and a table.
I cannot call to mind where or when, in my childhood, I had seen a stained glass window in a church.
It was spacious enough in all conscience, occupying the whole depth of the house, and having at either end a great bay window, as large as many modern rooms; in which some few panes of stained glass, emblazoned with fragments of armorial bearings, though cracked, and patched, and shattered, yet remained; attesting, by their presence, that the former owner had made the very light subservient to his state, and pressed the sun itself into his list of flatterers; bidding it, when it shone into his chamber, reflect the badges of his ancient family, and take new hues and colours from their pride.
Then we gazed round us at the high, thin window of old stained glass, the oak panelling, the stags' heads, the coats of arms upon the walls, all dim and sombre in the subdued light of the central lamp.
They sent abroad, to artists of great celebrity in those times, and having obtained the church's sanction to their work of piety, caused to be executed, in five large compartments of richly stained glass, a faithful copy of their old embroidery work.
If you could put up for a time with something of stained glass and a mahogany veranda--"
As we drove away I stole a glance back, and I still seem to see that little group on the step, the two graceful, clinging figures, the half-opened door, the hall light shining through stained glass, the barometer, and the bright stair-rods.
But these pieces are not that recent, and the question must be asked; what is the point of new stained glass commissions within a Church that is suffering year-on-year decline in congregations?