stalagmite


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sta·lag·mite

 (stə-lăg′mīt′, stăl′əg-)
n.
A conical mineral deposit, usually calcite or aragonite, built up on the floor of a cavern, formed from the dripping of mineral-rich water.

[New Latin stalagmītēs, a drop, from Greek stalagma, a drop, or stalagmos, dropping, both from stalassein, stalak-, to drip.]

stal′ag·mit′ic (stăl′əg-mĭt′ĭk, stə-lăg′-) adj.

stalagmite

(ˈstæləɡˌmaɪt)
n
(Geological Science) a cylindrical mass of calcium carbonate projecting upwards from the floor of a limestone cave: formed by precipitation from continually dripping water. Compare stalactite
[C17: from New Latin stalagmites, from Greek stalagmos dripping; related to Greek stalassein to drip; compare stalactite]
stalagmitic, ˌstalagˈmitical adj

sta•lag•mite

(stəˈlæg maɪt, ˈstæl əgˌmaɪt)

n.
a deposit, usu. of calcium carbonate, resembling an inverted stalactite, formed on the floor of a cave or the like by the dripping of percolating calcareous water.
[1675–85; < New Latin stalagmites < Greek stálagm(a) a drop (stalag-, s. of stalássein to drip + -ma n. suffix of result) + New Latin -ites -ite1]
stal`ag•mit′ic (-ˈmɪt ɪk) adj.

sta·lag·mite

(stə-lăg′mīt′)
A cylindrical or conical mineral deposit, similar to a stalactite, but built up from the floor of a cave or cavern.

stalagmite

A calcium carbonate column on a cave floor formed in the same way as a stalactite.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stalagmite - a cylinder of calcium carbonate projecting upward from the floor of a limestone cave
cave - a geological formation consisting of an underground enclosure with access from the surface of the ground or from the sea
cylinder - a surface generated by rotating a parallel line around a fixed line
dripstone - the form of calcium carbonate found in stalactites and stalagmites
Translations
stalagmit
stalagmit
StalagmitTropfstein
álló cseppkõ
dropasteinskerti
stalagmitas
stalagmīts
stalagmit
dikit

stalagmite

[ˈstæləgmaɪt] Nestalagmita f

stalagmite

[ˈstæləgmaɪt] nstalagmite f

stalagmite

nStalagmit m

stalagmite

[ˈstæləgˌmaɪt] nstalagmite f

stalagmite

(ˈstӕləgmait) , ((American) stəˈlӕgmait) noun
a spike of limestone rising from the floor of a cave, formed by water dripping from the roof.
References in classic literature ?
This shortly brought them to a be- witching spring, whose basin was incrusted with a frostwork of glittering crystals; it was in the midst of a cavern whose walls were supported by many fan- tastic pillars which had been formed by the joining of great stalactites and stalagmites together, the result of the ceaseless water-drip of centuries.
Sometimes the stalagmites took strange forms, presumably where the dropping of the water had not always been on the same spot.
According to ANSTO palaeoclimatologist Dr Pauline Treble, south-west Western Australia is an ideal site for stalagmite research as it has a Mediterranean-type climate with distinctly wet winters and dry summers.
In the face of violent protests from Muslims, the Kashmir government withdrew its decision of transferring land to build shelters for Hindu pilgrims visiting the Amarnath cave to pray by an ice stalagmite considered sacred.
Just as easily, it could have been stumbled upon by hooligans desirous of bagging a goofy stalagmite for the mantelpiece, or of leaving behind a girlfriend's name etched into centuries-old flowstone ooze.
height of stalagmite, and altitude of stalagmite base) to represent 3-D objects of the class Inside.
Divers can go down 130 feet and examine the stalagmite and stalactite formations.
The tour stops here and people get a chance to bang the stalagmite that looks and sounds just like a drum.
People will have the opportunity to meet woodland ice creatures, roam through a stalagmite ice forest and see ice bears, wolves, stags, owls, foxes, squirrels and rabbits.
One of Europe's most remarkable stalagmite formations, the Cloud Chamber, formed more than 300 million years ago, is included in the programme.
The Committee excavated new trenches in two areas of the cave (near the entrance of Clinnick's Gallery and in the Lecture Hall), as well as a horizontal shaft that extended eastwards underneath the stalagmite floor from MacEnery's old trench in the Sloping Chamber (Pengelly 1878: 177-80).