stalagmite


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sta·lag·mite

 (stə-lăg′mīt′, stăl′əg-)
n.
A conical mineral deposit, usually calcite or aragonite, built up on the floor of a cavern, formed from the dripping of mineral-rich water.

[New Latin stalagmītēs, a drop, from Greek stalagma, a drop, or stalagmos, dropping, both from stalassein, stalak-, to drip.]

stal′ag·mit′ic (stăl′əg-mĭt′ĭk, stə-lăg′-) adj.

stalagmite

(ˈstæləɡˌmaɪt)
n
(Geological Science) a cylindrical mass of calcium carbonate projecting upwards from the floor of a limestone cave: formed by precipitation from continually dripping water. Compare stalactite
[C17: from New Latin stalagmites, from Greek stalagmos dripping; related to Greek stalassein to drip; compare stalactite]
stalagmitic, ˌstalagˈmitical adj

sta•lag•mite

(stəˈlæg maɪt, ˈstæl əgˌmaɪt)

n.
a deposit, usu. of calcium carbonate, resembling an inverted stalactite, formed on the floor of a cave or the like by the dripping of percolating calcareous water.
[1675–85; < New Latin stalagmites < Greek stálagm(a) a drop (stalag-, s. of stalássein to drip + -ma n. suffix of result) + New Latin -ites -ite1]
stal`ag•mit′ic (-ˈmɪt ɪk) adj.

sta·lag·mite

(stə-lăg′mīt′)
A cylindrical or conical mineral deposit, similar to a stalactite, but built up from the floor of a cave or cavern.

stalagmite

A calcium carbonate column on a cave floor formed in the same way as a stalactite.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stalagmite - a cylinder of calcium carbonate projecting upward from the floor of a limestone cave
cave - a geological formation consisting of an underground enclosure with access from the surface of the ground or from the sea
cylinder - a surface generated by rotating a parallel line around a fixed line
dripstone - the form of calcium carbonate found in stalactites and stalagmites
Translations
stalagmit
stalagmit
StalagmitTropfstein
álló cseppkõ
dropasteinskerti
stalagmitas
stalagmīts
stalagmit
dikit

stalagmite

[ˈstæləgmaɪt] Nestalagmita f

stalagmite

[ˈstæləgmaɪt] nstalagmite f

stalagmite

nStalagmit m

stalagmite

[ˈstæləgˌmaɪt] nstalagmite f

stalagmite

(ˈstӕləgmait) , ((American) stəˈlӕgmait) noun
a spike of limestone rising from the floor of a cave, formed by water dripping from the roof.
References in classic literature ?
This shortly brought them to a be- witching spring, whose basin was incrusted with a frostwork of glittering crystals; it was in the midst of a cavern whose walls were supported by many fan- tastic pillars which had been formed by the joining of great stalactites and stalagmites together, the result of the ceaseless water-drip of centuries.
Sometimes the stalagmites took strange forms, presumably where the dropping of the water had not always been on the same spot.
The scientists dated the bones with the help of a stalagmite in the Chan Hol cave that was growing on top of the skeleton's pelvis.
Situated at 3,888 metres above the sea-level, the Amarnath cave houses an ice stalagmite structure that waxes and wanes with the size of the visible moon.
Sat in a large limestone cave within the Zagros mountains, several miles outside of the city, the nearly seven-metre tall statue was carved out of a single stalagmite, with great care and attention paid to the details of his features and omate attire.
The cave also features stalagmite formations that take different forms and sizes.
Neandertal groups explored the cave's dark recesses, where they assembled stalagmite pieces into complex configurations, archaeologist Jacques Jaubert of the University of Bordeaux in France and colleagues report in the June 2 Nature.
By comparing sediment cores dating back 282,000 years taken from the coast of Papua New Guinea and stalagmite samples from ancient caves in China, researchers found a previously unknown effect in the western Pacific Ocean from obliquity, which is the angle between the plane of the equator and the plane of Earth's orbit around the Sun, As Milankovitch learned, Earth's obliquity fluctuates every 41,000 years between 22.
A Having the world's largest stalagmite B The storing of vintage champagne C Prehistoric wall paintings D The production of truffles QUESTION 11 - for 11 points: Who preceded Theresa May as Home Secretary?
The team reconstructed rainfall patterns and temperature over 450 years by analyzing the chemical composition of a stalagmite recovered from a cave in Belize.
We could see] the roof, the lake beside us, and a massive stalagmite hundreds of meters away," says Daniela Pani.
By adapting models the process of stalagmite formation to include chemical properties and varying temperature, he was able to forecast how minerals can be deposited under unnatural conditions.