stalk


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stalk 1

 (stôk)
n.
1.
a. A stem or main axis of a herbaceous plant.
b. A stem or similar structure that supports a plant part such as a flower, flower cluster, or leaf.
2. A slender or elongated support or structure, as one that holds up an organ or another body part.

[Middle English, probably diminutive of stale, upright of a ladder, post, handle, from Old English stalu; see stel- in Indo-European roots.]

stalk′y adj.

stalk 2

 (stôk)
v. stalked, stalk·ing, stalks
v.tr.
1. To pursue or track (prey) stealthily: The lions stalked the zebra from the tall grass.
2. To follow or observe (a person) persistently, especially out of obsession or derangement.
3. To go through (an area) in pursuit of prey or quarry.
v.intr.
1. To walk with a stiff, haughty, or angry gait: stalked off in a huff.
2. To move threateningly or menacingly.
3. To track prey or quarry.

[Middle English stalken, from Old English -stealcian, to move stealthily (in bestealcian).]

stalk′er n.

stalk

(stɔːk)
n
1. (Botany) the main stem of a herbaceous plant
2. (Botany) any of various subsidiary plant stems, such as a leafstalk (petiole) or flower stalk (peduncle)
3. (Zoology) a slender supporting structure in animals such as crinoids and certain protozoans, coelenterates, and barnacles
4. any long slender supporting shaft or column
[C14: probably a diminutive formed from Old English stalu upright piece of wood; related to Old Frisian staal handle]
stalked adj
ˈstalkless adj
ˈstalkˌlike adj

stalk

(stɔːk)
vb
1. (Hunting) to follow or approach (game, prey, etc) stealthily and quietly
2. to pursue persistently and, sometimes, attack (a person with whom one is obsessed, often a celebrity)
3. to spread over (a place) in a menacing or grim manner: fever stalked the camp.
4. (intr) to walk in a haughty, stiff, or threatening way: he stalked out in disgust.
5. (Hunting) to search or draw (a piece of land) for prey
n
6. (Hunting) the act of stalking
7. a stiff or threatening stride
[Old English bestealcian to walk stealthily; related to Middle Low German stolkeren, Danish stalke]
ˈstalker n

stalk1

(stɔk)

n.
1. the stem or main axis of a plant.
2. any slender supporting part of a plant, as a petiole or peduncle.
3. a similar structural part of an animal.
4. a stem, shaft, or slender supporting part of anything.
[1275–1325; Middle English stalke, appar. = Old English stal(u) stave + -k diminutive suffix]
stalked, adj.
stalk′less, adj.
stalk′like`, adj.

stalk2

(stɔk)

v.i.
1. to pursue prey, quarry, etc., stealthily.
2. to walk with measured, stiff, or haughty strides (often fol. by away, off, etc.).
3. to proceed in a steady, deliberate, or sinister manner.
v.t.
4. to pursue (game, a person, etc.) stealthily.
5. to harass (a person) threateningly, as by pursuit, intimidating phone calls, etc.
6. to proceed through (an area) in search of prey or quarry.
7. to proceed or spread through in a steady or sinister manner.
n.
8. an act or course of stalking.
9. a slow, stiff stride or gait.
[1250–1300; compare Old English bestealcian to move stealthily, akin to steal]
stalk′er, n.

stalk

(stôk)
1. Botany
a. The main stem of a plant.
b. A slender structure that supports a plant part, such as a flower or leaf.
2. A slender supporting or connecting part of an animal, such as the eyestalk of a lobster.

stalk

  • stipe - A stalk or stem of a seaweed, fungus, or fern frond.
  • cranberry - First crane berry, so named because the plant grows on a stalk that looks like a crane's neck.
  • spire - In Old English, it meant "stalk" or "stem."
  • stalk - In a car, the flexible arm holding the mounting by which a seatbelt is secured.

Stalk

 of foresters: company of foresters—Bk. of St. Albans, 1486.

stalk


Past participle: stalked
Gerund: stalking

Imperative
stalk
stalk
Present
I stalk
you stalk
he/she/it stalks
we stalk
you stalk
they stalk
Preterite
I stalked
you stalked
he/she/it stalked
we stalked
you stalked
they stalked
Present Continuous
I am stalking
you are stalking
he/she/it is stalking
we are stalking
you are stalking
they are stalking
Present Perfect
I have stalked
you have stalked
he/she/it has stalked
we have stalked
you have stalked
they have stalked
Past Continuous
I was stalking
you were stalking
he/she/it was stalking
we were stalking
you were stalking
they were stalking
Past Perfect
I had stalked
you had stalked
he/she/it had stalked
we had stalked
you had stalked
they had stalked
Future
I will stalk
you will stalk
he/she/it will stalk
we will stalk
you will stalk
they will stalk
Future Perfect
I will have stalked
you will have stalked
he/she/it will have stalked
we will have stalked
you will have stalked
they will have stalked
Future Continuous
I will be stalking
you will be stalking
he/she/it will be stalking
we will be stalking
you will be stalking
they will be stalking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been stalking
you have been stalking
he/she/it has been stalking
we have been stalking
you have been stalking
they have been stalking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been stalking
you will have been stalking
he/she/it will have been stalking
we will have been stalking
you will have been stalking
they will have been stalking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been stalking
you had been stalking
he/she/it had been stalking
we had been stalking
you had been stalking
they had been stalking
Conditional
I would stalk
you would stalk
he/she/it would stalk
we would stalk
you would stalk
they would stalk
Past Conditional
I would have stalked
you would have stalked
he/she/it would have stalked
we would have stalked
you would have stalked
they would have stalked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stalk - material consisting of seed coverings and small pieces of stem or leaves that have been separated from the seedsstalk - material consisting of seed coverings and small pieces of stem or leaves that have been separated from the seeds
bran - broken husks of the seeds of cereal grains that are separated from the flour by sifting
plant material, plant substance - material derived from plants
2.stalk - a slender or elongated structure that supports a plant or fungus or a plant part or plant organ
gynophore - the stalk of a pistil that raises it above the receptacle
carpophore - a slender stalk that furnishes an axis for a carpel
corn stalk, cornstalk - the stalk of a corn plant
filament - the stalk of a stamen
funicle, funiculus - the stalk of a plant ovule or seed
petiolule - the stalk of a leaflet
cane - a strong slender often flexible stem as of bamboos, reeds, rattans, or sugar cane
plant organ - a functional and structural unit of a plant or fungus
sporangiophore - stalk bearing one or more sporangia
cutting, slip - a part (sometimes a root or leaf or bud) removed from a plant to propagate a new plant through rooting or grafting
tuber - a fleshy underground stem or root serving for reproductive and food storage
rhizome, rootstalk, rootstock - a horizontal plant stem with shoots above and roots below serving as a reproductive structure
axis - the main stem or central part about which plant organs or plant parts such as branches are arranged
caudex - woody stem of palms and tree ferns
internode - a segment of a stem between two nodes
beanstalk - stem of a bean plant
cladode, cladophyll, phylloclad, phylloclade - a flattened stem resembling and functioning as a leaf
receptacle - enlarged tip of a stem that bears the floral parts
caudex, stock - persistent thickened stem of a herbaceous perennial plant
stipe - supporting stalk or stem-like structure especially of a pistil or fern frond or supporting a mushroom cap
flower stalk, scape - erect leafless flower stalk growing directly from the ground as in a tulip
leafstalk, petiole - the slender stem that supports the blade of a leaf
bulb - a modified bud consisting of a thickened globular underground stem serving as a reproductive structure
corm - solid swollen underground bulb-shaped stem or stem base and serving as a reproductive structure
leaf node, node - (botany) the small swelling that is the part of a plant stem from which one or more leaves emerge
branch - a division of a stem, or secondary stem arising from the main stem of a plant
culm - stem of plants of the Gramineae
halm, haulm - stems of beans and peas and potatoes and grasses collectively as used for thatching and bedding
tree trunk, trunk, bole - the main stem of a tree; usually covered with bark; the bole is usually the part that is commercially useful for lumber
3.stalk - a hunt for game carried on by following it stealthily or waiting in ambushstalk - a hunt for game carried on by following it stealthily or waiting in ambush
hunting, hunt - the work of finding and killing or capturing animals for food or pelts
deerstalking - stalking deer
4.stalk - the act of following prey stealthily
chase, pursual, pursuit, following - the act of pursuing in an effort to overtake or capture; "the culprit started to run and the cop took off in pursuit"
5.stalk - a stiff or threatening gaitstalk - a stiff or threatening gait    
gait - a person's manner of walking
Verb1.stalk - walk stiffly
walk - use one's feet to advance; advance by steps; "Walk, don't run!"; "We walked instead of driving"; "She walks with a slight limp"; "The patient cannot walk yet"; "Walk over to the cabinet"
2.stalk - follow stealthily or recur constantly and spontaneously to; "her ex-boyfriend stalked her"; "the ghost of her mother haunted her"
pursue, follow - follow in or as if in pursuit; "The police car pursued the suspected attacker"; "Her bad deed followed her and haunted her dreams all her life"
3.stalk - go through (an area) in search of prey; "stalk the woods for deer"
pursue, follow - follow in or as if in pursuit; "The police car pursued the suspected attacker"; "Her bad deed followed her and haunted her dreams all her life"

stalk

1
noun stem, shoot, branch, stock, trunk, peduncle A single pale blue flower grows up from each joint on a long stalk.

stalk

2
verb
1. pursue, follow, track, hunt, shadow, tail (informal), haunt, creep up on He stalks his victims like a hunter after a deer.
2. march, pace, stride, strut, flounce If his patience is tried at meetings he has been known to stalk out.

stalk

verb
1. To walk with long steps, especially in a vigorous manner:
2. To look for and pursue (game) in order to capture or kill it:
Translations
ساقيَتَفَشّى، يُهَدِّديُطارِدُ خِلْسَةًيَمْشي مُتَشامِخا
kráčetstonekstopkastopovattáhnout
hærgeskridespankulerestængelstilk
kekkalehtiavaaniaväijyävarsi
breiîast útlæîast aîrigsastöngull, stilkur
cienīgi ietkātslavītiesložņātpielavīties
stopkatiahnuť
steblo
avına sinsice yaklaşmakazametle yürümeksaptehlikeli biçimde yayılmak

stalk

1 [stɔːk]
A. VT [+ animal] [hunter] → cazar al acecho; [animal] → acechar; [+ person] → seguir los pasos de
B. VI (= walk) to stalk away or offirse con paso airado
she stalked out of the roomsalió airada del cuarto

stalk

2 [stɔːk] N
1. (Bot) → tallo m, caña f; (= cabbage stalk) → troncho m
2. [of glass] → pie m
3. (Aut) (= control stalk) → palanca f

stalk

[ˈstɔːk]
n [flower, leaf] → tige f; [fruit] → queue f
vt (= track) [+ person, animal] → traquer
vi
to stalk in → entrer d'un pas raide
to stalk out → sortir d'un pas raide
to stalk off → sortir d'un pas raide

stalk

1
vt gamesich anpirschen an (+acc); (animal) → beschleichen, sich heranschleichen an (+acc); personsich anschleichen an (+acc); (= harass)belästigen, verfolgen; he’s stalking his former girlfriender stellt seiner Ex-Freundin nach; evil stalked the streets (liter)das Böse ging in den Straßen um
vi
(= walk haughtily)stolzieren
(Hunt) → pirschen; to go stalkingauf die Pirsch gehen

stalk

2
n (of plant, leaf)Stiel m; (= cabbage stalk)Strunk m; his eyes came out on stalks (inf)er bekam Stielaugen (inf)

stalk

1 [stɔːk]
1. vt (animal, person) → inseguire
2. vi to stalk in/outentrare/uscire impettito/a
she stalked out of the room angrily → uscì furiosa dalla stanza

stalk

2 [stɔːk] n (Bot) → gambo, stelo; (of cabbage) → torsolo; (of fruit) → picciolo

stalk1

(stoːk) noun
the stem of a plant or of a leaf, flower or fruit. If the stalk is damaged, the plant may die.

stalk2

(stoːk) verb
1. to walk stiffly and proudly, eg in anger. He stalked out of the room in disgust.
2. to move menacingly through a place. Disease and famine stalk (through) the country.
3. in hunting, to move gradually as close as possible to game, eg deer, trying to remain hidden. Have you ever stalked deer / been deer-stalking?
ˈstalker noun
a person who stalks game.

stalk

n. tallo, estructura alargada que se asemeja al tallo de una planta.
References in classic literature ?
She caught endless colds sitting on damp grass to book `delicious bit', composed of a stone, a stump, one mushroom, and a broken mullein stalk, or `a heavenly mass of clouds', that looked like a choice display of featherbeds when done.
They ain't dried fish, and they never grew on stalk or vine.
For as the mightiest elephant is but a terrier to Leviathan, so, compared with Leviathan's tail, his trunk is but the stalk of a lily.
And at the zenith of his fame, how he would suddenly appear at the old village and stalk into church, brown and weather-beaten, in his black velvet doublet and trunks, his great jack-boots, his crimson sash, his belt bristling with horse-pistols, his crime-rusted cut- lass at his side, his slouch hat with waving plumes, his black flag unfurled, with the skull and crossbones on it, and hear with swelling ecstasy the whisperings, "It's Tom Sawyer the Pirate
Well, couldn't we say, `The hollyhock might have been glad to see the rain, but there was a weak little hollyhock bud growing out of its stalk and it was afraid that that might be hurt by the storm; so the big hollyhock was kind of afraid, instead of being real glad'?
It's your inside as isn't right made for music: it's no better nor a hollow stalk.
Nothing is left but the stalk, white and withered as are the bones of men.
I left the twelfth Golden-Haired Bar-maid not too late to stalk her husband and her under-study to their hotel, where they evidently proposed to dine.
So from the root Springs lighter the green stalk, from thence the leaves More aerie, last the bright consummate floure Spirits odorous breathes: flours and thir fruit Mans nourishment, by gradual scale sublim'd To vital Spirits aspire, to animal, To intellectual, give both life and sense, Fansie and understanding, whence the soule Reason receives, and reason is her being, Discursive, or Intuitive; discourse Is oftest yours, the latter most is ours, Differing but in degree, of kind the same.
She crossed the ditch, took a pair of gardening gloves from her plaited straw hand-basket, and busied herself with the hemlock leaves, pulling the tender ones, separating them from the stalk, and filling the basket with the web.
The sudden flashes of colour reminded him of the gleam of the opal-and-iris-throated birds that flutter round the tall honeycombed Campanile, or stalk, with such stately grace, through the dim, dust-stained arcades.
said Alice in a tone of delight, which changed into alarm in another moment, when she found that her shoulders were nowhere to be found: all she could see, when she looked down, was an immense length of neck, which seemed to rise like a stalk out of a sea of green leaves that lay far below her.