stalls


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stall 1

 (stôl)
n.
1. A compartment for one domestic animal in a barn or shed.
2.
a. A booth, cubicle, or stand used by a vendor, as at a market.
b. A small compartment: a shower stall.
3.
a. An enclosed seat in the chancel of a church.
b. A pew in a church.
4. Chiefly British A seat in the front part of a theater.
5. A space marked off, as in a garage, for parking a motor vehicle.
6. A protective sheath for a finger or toe.
7. The sudden, unintended loss of power or effectiveness in an engine.
8. A condition in which an aircraft or airfoil experiences an interruption of airflow resulting in loss of lift and a tendency to drop.
v. stalled, stall·ing, stalls
v.tr.
1. To put or lodge in a stall.
2. To maintain in a stall for fattening: to stall cattle.
3. To halt the motion or progress of; bring to a standstill.
4. To cause (a motor or motor vehicle) accidentally to stop running.
5. To cause (an aircraft) to go into a stall.
v.intr.
1. To live or be lodged in a stall. Used of an animal.
2. To stick fast in mud or snow.
3. To come to a standstill: Negotiations stalled.
4. To stop running as a result of mechanical failure: The car stalled on the freeway.
5. To lose forward flying speed, causing a stall. Used of an aircraft.

[Middle English stalle, from Old English steall, standing place, stable; see stel- in Indo-European roots.]

stall 2

 (stôl)
n.
A ruse or tactic used to mislead or delay.
v. stalled, stall·ing, stalls
v.tr.
To employ delaying tactics against: stall off creditors.
v.intr.
To employ delaying tactics: stalling for time.

[Alteration (influenced by stall) of obsolete stale, pickpocket's accomplice, from Middle English, decoy, from Anglo-Norman estale, of Germanic origin; possibly akin to Old English stǣl, stathol, place, position; see staddle.]

stalls

Separate seats, usually with arm rests, originally at the front of the lower level of the auditorium, now usually all that level.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stalls - a farm building for housing horses or other livestockstalls - a farm building for housing horses or other livestock
farm building - a building on a farm
livery stable - stable where horses and vehicles are kept for hire
stall - a compartment in a stable where a single animal is confined and fed
Translations
مَقْعَد أمامي في المَسْرَح
křesla v přízemí
gulvet
zsöllye
fremstu sæti
kreslá na prízemí
parter

stall1

(stoːl) noun
1. a compartment in a cowshed etc. cattle stalls.
2. a small shop or a counter or table on which goods are displayed for sale. He bought a newspaper at the bookstall on the station; traders' stalls.
stalls noun plural
(often with the) in a theatre, the seats on the ground floor. I always sit in the stalls.
References in classic literature ?
The first stall was a large square one, shut in behind with a wooden gate; the others were common stalls, good stalls, but not nearly so large; it had a low rack for hay and a low manger for corn; it was called a loose box, because the horse that was put into it was not tied up, but left loose, to do as he liked.
Then they made their way through the front rows of stalls and looked at Box Five on the grand tier, They could not see it well, because it was half in darkness and because great covers were flung over the red velvet of the ledges of all the boxes.
A grand arch, cut in the upper wall at one end, surmounted an oaken orchestra, with an open room behind it, where hothouse plants and stalls for refreshments were disposed; an agreeable resort for gentlemen disposed to loiter, and yet to exchange the occasional crush down below for a more commodious point of view.
The music sounded louder and through the door rows of brightly lit boxes in which ladies sat with bare arms and shoulders, and noisy stalls brilliant with uniforms, glittered before their eyes.
The Dodger had a vicious propensity, too, of pulling the caps from the heads of small boys and tossing them down areas; while Charley Bates exhibited some very loose notions concerning the rights of property, by pilfering divers apples and onions from the stalls at the kennel sides, and thrusting them into pockets which were so surprisingly capacious, that they seemed to undermine his whole suit of clothes in every direction.
My friends amused themselves with looking for familiar faces in the boxes and stalls.
An objection may perhaps be apprehended from the more delicate, that this dish is too common and vulgar; for what else is the subject of all the romances, novels, plays, and poems, with which the stalls abound?
They took the two end stalls, Trent on the outside.
In the shed there were five horses in their separate stalls, and Vronsky knew that his chief rival, Gladiator, a very tall chestnut horse, had been brought there, and must be standing among them.
Assuredly, this stall of Silas Wegg's was the hardest little stall of all the sterile little stalls in London.
Nay, man, there are finer stalls in Cheapside," answered Ford, whose father had taken him to London on occasion of one of the Smithfield joustings.
They lived on this as long as it lasted; and then her husband bought a fresh lot of ware, and she sat herself down with it in the corner of the market; but a drunken soldier soon came by, and rode his horse against her stall, and broke all her goods into a thousand pieces.