stalwart


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stal·wart

 (stôl′wərt)
adj.
1. Loyal and resolute: a stalwart ally; stalwart support.
2. Strong and imposing: a stalwart oak tree.
n.
One who steadfastly supports an organization or cause: party stalwarts.

[Middle English, alteration of stalworth, from Old English stǣlwierthe, serviceable, probably alteration of *statholwierthe, steadfast : stathol, foundation; see staddle + weorth, valuable; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

stal′wart·ly adv.
stal′wart·ness n.

stalwart

(ˈstɔːlwət)
adj
1. strong and sturdy; robust
2. solid, dependable, and courageous: stalwart citizens.
3. resolute and firm
n
a stalwart person, esp a supporter
[Old English stǣlwirthe serviceable, from stǣl, shortened from stathol support + wierthe worth1]
ˈstalwartly adv
ˈstalwartness n

stal•wart

(ˈstɔl wərt)

adj.
1. strongly and stoutly built; sturdy and robust.
2. strong and brave; valiant.
3. firm; steadfast.
n.
4. a physically stalwart person.
5. a steadfast partisan: party stalwarts.
[1325–75; Middle English stalwurthe, Old English stǣlwirthe serviceable]
stal′wart•ly, adv.
stal′wart•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stalwart - a person who is loyal to their allegiance (especially in times of revolt)stalwart - a person who is loyal to their allegiance (especially in times of revolt)
admirer, booster, protagonist, supporter, champion, friend - a person who backs a politician or a team etc.; "all their supporters came out for the game"; "they are friends of the library"
Adj.1.stalwart - having rugged physical strength; inured to fatigue or hardships; "hardy explorers of northern Canada"; "proud of her tall stalwart son"; "stout seamen"; "sturdy young athletes"
robust - sturdy and strong in form, constitution, or construction; "a robust body"; "a robust perennial"
2.stalwart - dependable; "the stalwart citizens at Lexington"; "a stalwart supporter of the UN"; "stout hearts"
resolute - firm in purpose or belief; characterized by firmness and determination; "stood resolute against the enemy"; "faced with a resolute opposition"; "a resolute and unshakeable faith"
3.stalwart - used especially of persons; "a stalwart knight"; "a stouthearted fellow who had an active career in the army"
brave, courageous - possessing or displaying courage; able to face and deal with danger or fear without flinching; "Familiarity with danger makes a brave man braver but less daring"- Herman Melville; "a frank courageous heart...triumphed over pain"- William Wordsworth; "set a courageous example by leading them safely into and out of enemy-held territory"

stalwart

noun
1. adherent, follower, attendant, groupie (informal), hanger-on (informal) a stalwart of the revered Kurt Edelhagen Orchestra
adjective
1. loyal, faithful, staunch, supporter, fan, strong, firm, true, constant, resolute, dependable, steadfast, true-blue, tried and true a stalwart supporter of the colonial government
2. strong, strapping, robust, athletic, vigorous, rugged, manly, hefty (informal), muscular, sturdy, stout, husky (informal), beefy (informal), lusty, sinewy, brawny I was never in any danger with my stalwart bodyguard around me.
strong feeble, puny, weak, frail, sickly, infirm, namby-pamby, shilpit (Scot.)

stalwart

adjective
Capable of exerting considerable effort or of withstanding considerable stress or hardship:
Translations

stalwart

[ˈstɔːlwət]
A. ADJ [person] (in spirit) → fuerte, robusto; (in build) → fornido, robusto; [supporter, opponent] → leal, fiel; [belief] → empedernido
B. Npartidario/a m/f incondicional

stalwart

[ˈstɔːlwərt] nfidèle partisan(e) m/f

stalwart

adj
(in spirit) → treu, unentwegt; supportertreu, getreu; beliefunerschütterlich
(in build) → kräftig, robust
n (= supporter)(getreuer) Anhänger; the party leader and his stalwartsder Parteichef und seine Getreuen

stalwart

[ˈstɔːlwət]
1. adj (person, in spirit) → prode, coraggioso/a; (party member) → fidato/a; (supporter, opponent) → risoluto/a, deciso/a
References in classic literature ?
A call at Meg's, and a refreshing sniff and sip at the Daisy and Demijohn, still further fortified her for the tete-a-tete, but when she saw a stalwart figure looming in the distance, she had a strong desire to turn about and run away.
To-day the best that a harassed Black Hawk merchant can hope for is to sell provisions and farm machinery and automobiles to the rich farms where that first crop of stalwart Bohemian and Scandinavian girls are now the mistresses.
Without absolutely expressing a doubt whether the stalwart Puritan had acted as a man of conscience and integrity throughout the proceedings which have been sketched, they, nevertheless, hinted that he was about to build his house over an unquiet grave.
There was one thing that much aided me in renewing and re-creating the stalwart soldier of the Niagara frontier -- the man of true and simple energy.
They are mostly young, of stalwart frames; fellows who have felled forests, and now seek to drop the axe and snatch the whale-lance.
Next to me sat an English bride, and next to her sat her new husband, whom she called "Neddy," though he was big enough and stalwart enough to be entitled to his full name.
He banged at the door, and presently the heads of the old man and his two stalwart sons were thrust from windows.
I can remember Miss Temple walking lightly and rapidly along our drooping line, her plaid cloak, which the frosty wind fluttered, gathered close about her, and encouraging us, by precept and example, to keep up our spirits, and march forward, as she said, "like stalwart soldiers.
The apartment and furniture would have been nothing extraordinary as belonging to a homely, northern farmer, with a stubborn countenance, and stalwart limbs set out to advantage in knee- breeches and gaiters.
A winding strip of road was visible, at no great distance, amid the undulations of the open ground; and along this strip the stalwart figure of Mr.
Lovely girls; bright women, brown-haired, black-haired, and grey; youths; stalwart men and old; gentle born and peasant born; all red wine for La Guillotine, all daily brought into light from the dark cellars of the loathsome prisons, and carried to her through the streets to slake her devouring thirst.
Ay, ay construe us the story,'' said a burly Friar, who stood beside them, leaning on a pole that exhibited an appearance between a pilgrim's staff and a quarter-staff, and probably acted as either when occasion served, ``Your story,'' said the stalwart churchman; ``burn not daylight about it we have short time to spare.