stampede


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stam·pede

 (stăm-pēd′)
n.
1. A sudden frenzied rush of panic-stricken animals.
2. A sudden headlong rush or flight of a crowd of people.
3. A mass impulsive action: a stampede of support for the candidate.
v. stam·ped·ed, stam·ped·ing, stam·pedes
v.tr.
1. To cause (a herd of animals) to flee in panic.
2. To cause (a person or group) to act impulsively: He refused to be stampeded into making a rash decision.
3. To trample in a stampede.
v.intr.
1. To flee or rush in a stampede.
2. To act on mass impulse.

[Spanish estampida, uproar, stampede, from Provençal, from estampir, to stamp, of Germanic origin; akin to Middle English stampen, to pound, stamp.]

stam·ped′er n.

stampede

(stæmˈpiːd)
n
1. (Agriculture) an impulsive headlong rush of startled cattle or horses
2. headlong rush of a crowd: a stampede of shoppers.
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) any sudden large-scale movement or other action, such as a rush of people to support a candidate
4. (Agriculture) Western US and Canadian a rodeo event featuring fairground and social elements
vb
to run away or cause to run away in a stampede
[C19: from American Spanish estampida, from Spanish: a din, from estampar to stamp, of Germanic origin; see stamp]
stamˈpeder n

stam•pede

(stæmˈpid)

n., v. -ped•ed, -ped•ing. n.
1. a sudden, frenzied rush or headlong flight of a herd of frightened animals, esp. cattle or horses.
2. any headlong general flight or rush.
3. Western U.S., Canada. a celebration, usu. held annually, combining a rodeo, contests, dancing, etc.
v.i.
4. to scatter or flee in a stampede.
5. to make a general rush.
v.t.
6. to cause to stampede.
7. to rush or overrun (a place).
[1815–25, Amer.; < American Spanish estampida, Sp, =estamp(ar) to stamp + -ida n. suffix]
stam•ped′er, n.

stampede

- From Mexican Spanish estampida, "crash, uproar."
See also related terms for uproar.

stampede


Past participle: stampeded
Gerund: stampeding

Imperative
stampede
stampede
Present
I stampede
you stampede
he/she/it stampedes
we stampede
you stampede
they stampede
Preterite
I stampeded
you stampeded
he/she/it stampeded
we stampeded
you stampeded
they stampeded
Present Continuous
I am stampeding
you are stampeding
he/she/it is stampeding
we are stampeding
you are stampeding
they are stampeding
Present Perfect
I have stampeded
you have stampeded
he/she/it has stampeded
we have stampeded
you have stampeded
they have stampeded
Past Continuous
I was stampeding
you were stampeding
he/she/it was stampeding
we were stampeding
you were stampeding
they were stampeding
Past Perfect
I had stampeded
you had stampeded
he/she/it had stampeded
we had stampeded
you had stampeded
they had stampeded
Future
I will stampede
you will stampede
he/she/it will stampede
we will stampede
you will stampede
they will stampede
Future Perfect
I will have stampeded
you will have stampeded
he/she/it will have stampeded
we will have stampeded
you will have stampeded
they will have stampeded
Future Continuous
I will be stampeding
you will be stampeding
he/she/it will be stampeding
we will be stampeding
you will be stampeding
they will be stampeding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been stampeding
you have been stampeding
he/she/it has been stampeding
we have been stampeding
you have been stampeding
they have been stampeding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been stampeding
you will have been stampeding
he/she/it will have been stampeding
we will have been stampeding
you will have been stampeding
they will have been stampeding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been stampeding
you had been stampeding
he/she/it had been stampeding
we had been stampeding
you had been stampeding
they had been stampeding
Conditional
I would stampede
you would stampede
he/she/it would stampede
we would stampede
you would stampede
they would stampede
Past Conditional
I would have stampeded
you would have stampeded
he/she/it would have stampeded
we would have stampeded
you would have stampeded
they would have stampeded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stampede - a headlong rush of people on a common impulse; "when he shouted `fire' there was a stampede to the exits"
group action - action taken by a group of people
2.stampede - a wild headlong rush of frightened animals (horses or cattle)
change of location, travel - a movement through space that changes the location of something
Verb1.stampede - cause to run in panic; "Thunderbolts can stampede animals"
2.stampede - cause a group or mass of people to act on an impulse or hurriedly and impulsively; "The tavern owners stampeded us into overeating"
3.stampede - act, usually en masse, hurriedly or on an impulse; "Companies will now stampede to release their latest software"
act, move - perform an action, or work out or perform (an action); "think before you act"; "We must move quickly"; "The governor should act on the new energy bill"; "The nanny acted quickly by grabbing the toddler and covering him with a wet towel"
4.stampede - run away in a stampede
flee, take flight, fly - run away quickly; "He threw down his gun and fled"

stampede

noun
1. rush, charge, flight, scattering, rout There was a stampede for the exit.
verb
1. bolt, run, charge, race, career, rush, dash The crowd stampeded and many were crushed or trampled underfoot.
Translations
فِرار جَماعييَسْتَولي الذُّعْر وَيَفِرّون جَماعِيّا
splašitúprk
få til at flygte
stampedo
eszeveszett menekülésfejvesztetten menekül
styggî, flóttistyggja; ryîjast, flykkjast
paniškai bėgtipaniškas bėgimas
panikā bēgtpaniska bēgšanapiespiest panikā bēgt
splašiťútek splašeného stáda
ürk mekürkme

stampede

[stæmˌpiːd]
A. N (lit) → estampida f, desbandada f (fig) → desbandada f
there was a sudden stampede for the doortodo el mundo corrió en estampida hacia la puerta
the exodus turned into a stampedeel éxodo se transformó en una fuga precipitada
B. VT [+ cattle] → provocar la desbandada de
to stampede sb into doing sthpresionar fuerte a algn para que haga algo
let's not be stampededno obremos precipitadamente
C. VI (lit) → ir en desbandada (fig) → precipitarse

stampede

[stæmˈpiːd] n
(= rush) → ruée f
[cattle] → débandade fstamp machine ndistributeur m de timbres-poste

stampede

n (of horses, cattle)wilde Flucht; (of people)Massenandrang m, → Massenansturm m (→ on auf +acc); (to escape) → wilde or panikartige Flucht; the exodus turned into a stampededer Exodus geriet zur Panik
vt cattle, horses, crowdin (wilde or helle) Panik versetzen; to stampede somebody into doing something (fig)jdn dazu drängen, etw zu tun; let’s not be stampeded (fig)wir wollen uns nicht kopfscheu machen lassen
vidurchgehen; (crowd)losstürmen (→ for auf +acc)

stampede

[stæmˈpiːd]
1. n (of cattle) → fuga precipitosa; (of people) → fuggi fuggi m inv
there was a sudden stampede for the door → ci fu un fuggi fuggi verso la porta
2. vt (cattle) → far scappare
to stampede sb into doing sth (pej) → spingere qn a fare qc senza dargli il tempo di riflettere
3. vi (cattle) → fuggire precipitosamente (fig) → precipitarsi

stampede

(stӕmˈpiːd) noun
a sudden wild rush of wild animals etc. a stampede of buffaloes; The school bell rang for lunch and there was a stampede for the door.
verb
to (cause to) rush in a stampede. The noise stampeded the elephants / made the elephants stampede.
References in classic literature ?
Of course there was a general stampede, and for several minutes everybody seemed to lose their wits, for the strangest things were done, and no one said a word.
But water was preferable to fire, and still the stampede from the windows continued, and still the pitiless drenching assailed it until the building was empty; then the fireboys mounted to the hall and flooded it with water enough to annihilate forty times as much fire as there was there; for a village fire company does not often get a chance to show off, and so when it does get a chance, it makes the most of it.
The children had told the village about the buffalo stampede, and Buldeo went out angrily, only too anxious to correct Mowgli for not taking better care of the herd.
To be held paralyzed, with one's back toward some horrible and unknown danger from the very sound of which the ferocious Apache warriors turn in wild stampede, as a flock of sheep would madly flee from a pack of wolves, seems to me the last word in fearsome predicaments for a man who had ever been used to fighting for his life with all the energy of a powerful physique.
And this was no disciplined march; it was a stampede--a stampede gigantic and terrible--without order and without a goal, six million people unarmed and unprovisioned, driving headlong.
The sight of this stampede exerted a floodlike force that seemed able to drag sticks and stones and men from the ground.
The furbearing animals extinct, a complete change will come over the scene; the gay free trapper and his steed, decked out in wild array, and tinkling with bells and trinketry; the savage war chief, plumed and painted and ever on the prowl; the traders' cavalcade, winding through defiles or over naked plains, with the stealthy war party lurking on its trail; the buffalo chase, the hunting camp, the mad carouse in the midst of danger, the night attack, the stampede, the scamper, the fierce skirmish among rocks and cliffs -- all this romance of savage life, which yet exists among the mountains, will then exist but in frontier story, and seem like the fictions of chivalry or fairy tale.
From every side men, women, and children were rushing wildly for shelter, swarming up the staircases and into the caves in a mad stampede.
But a moment after they had made a stampede toward him, and when they laid their hands on him he knew that they were men.
When the men trailed into the presence of the ladies for that brief seance on which etiquette insisted before permitting the stampede to the billiard-room, Elsa was not to be seen.
Dismounted warriors were trampled underfoot in the stampede which followed.
Nor was this the worst; for not the crew only, but, in many cases, captain and officers as well, would join in the stampede to the diggings; and we found Hobson's Bay the congested asylum of all manner of masterless and deserted vessels.